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Natural History

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
The Philadelphia Print Shop in Chestnut Hill is celebrating nature. The images of flowers, birds, insects, quadrupeds and shells in its current exhibition, called "Celebrating Nature," are accompanied by two catalogues of natural-history prints and books: Natural History to 1800 and 19th Century Natural History, compiled by the Print Shop. Both describe the color-plate books from which the prints were taken, and tell about the artists who created these herbals and illustrations of plants in the royal botanic gardens of Europe and about the pioneer naturalists who went out in the wild to draw birds and animals.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A new exhibit at the Chester County Historical Society takes a rare look at the early Chester County residents who were caught up in the natural-history studies of their day. In some cases, the life stories found in "Animal, Vegetable and Mineral: The World of Chester County Naturalists" show an intense pursuit. The amateur naturalists included men such as Walter Jefferis (1820-1906), a West Chester bank cashier who built a separate house to contain his mineral collection.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a Thursday afternoon at the National Museum of Natural History, and the young man with the thinning hair and the steel-rim glasses seemed to fit right in. He had the quiet, pensive look of a curator, and he was listening attentively as Vicki Funk, the Smithsonian Institution's curator of botany, told him about the time her helicopter went down in the mountains of Peru. "We had three days of food, and we were stranded for 10 days," said Funk, "so we had to eat birds.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Center City book dealer Hayes Hibberd got suspicious when two strangers popped into his shop one Sunday last December and offered to sell him a rare two-volume natural-history book published in the 18th century. The two men had the smell of liquor on their breaths. They were carrying the book, worth $250,000, in a plastic trash bag. And they were willing to sell it for half its value, Assistant U.S. Attorney Seth Weber said yesterday. When the men returned the next day to consummate the deal, Hibberd was waiting with two undercover cops he had called.
NEWS
April 24, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The nice thing about a program of short works is that it's like eating tapas - if one little plate isn't to your taste, there's always another one. Natural History is a quartet of little plays by Jennifer Camp linked by theme (love) and locale (the American Museum of Natural History in New York). They provide a charming and entertaining evening (about 90 minutes) in the Walnut Independence Studio's Philadelphia premiere. Three accomplished actors (Evan Jonigkeit, Wendy Scharfman and Russ Widdal)
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is the nation's oldest natural history museum, and this month marks its 200th anniversary. On March 21, 1812, John Speakman, Jacob Gilliams, and others met to form an "academy" for the study of natural history, and "for the encouragement and cultivation of the sciences, and the advancement of useful learning. " Its original headquarters was 121 N. Second St. About three years later, the academy moved to larger quarters on Arch Street, between Front Street and Second.
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1865, a 44-year-old Chester County woman named Graceanna Lewis sought work through an advertising circular that she sent to neighbors and friends. While it was not unusual for an educated single Quaker woman such as Lewis to seek employment, Lewis was not looking for the customary seamstress or millinery job. The four "parlour lessons" that Lewis promised to give in her West Vincent home for $2 were in ornithology, or the study of birds. Lewis, who also ran an apple orchard on her farm with her two older sisters, could claim only a modest education in the subject.
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George F. Sandstr?m, 81, formerly of Cochranville, an artist and illustrator of natural history books, died of cancer June 1 at Herman Memorial Hospital in Houston. He had moved from Chester County to Sugarland, Texas, three years ago. Mr. Sandstr?m illustrated 40 books, including Seashells of the World and Gems and Semiprecious Stones for Golden Press; Philippine Birds, South Pacific Birds and Woodpeckers of the World, published by the Delaware Museum of Natural History; and two books on rocks and minerals by Charles Sorrell.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Indulge your sweet tooth with endless ice cream flavors on Saturday and Sunday at Penn's Landing while supporting a good cause at the 15th annual Super Scooper All-You-Can-Eat Ice Cream Festival. From noon to 6 p.m., under one huge pavilion, taste samples from your favorite ice cream companies including Breyers, Turkey Hill, Häagen-Dazs, Ben & Jerry, Philadelphia Water Ice Company, and more. Proceeds will go to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to help fight pediatric leukemia. The event is presented by the Joshua Kahan Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Here's a factoid, courtesy of the Internet Movie Database: Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian marks the second time that Napoleon Bonaparte and Abraham Lincoln have appeared in the same film. The first? Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure. Which, by the way, is a vastly more meaningful moviegoing experience than this knee-jerk sequel to the surprise 2006 Ben Stiller smash. A super-size rehash of the original - transplanted from New York's Museum of Natural History to the sprawling mall of museums run by the Smithsonian in Washington - this family-friendly vehicle once again stars Stiller as the museum guard who communes with objects and artifacts on display after the doors close for the day. Except this time, as Night at the Museum - Part Duh begins, Stiller's Larry Daley is no longer employed as a guard.
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TRAVEL
January 27, 2014 | By Deborah Cascarino, For The Inquirer
I stopped for a moment on a curve of the switchback trail in Bryce Canyon, Utah. My fellow hikers had vanished from sight around the next bend, and I stood alone in complete silence. It was an eerie silence I had never experienced before: not a whisper of breeze, not a rustle of tree leaf, no human voice, no trickle of water. For that brief moment, I felt alone in the world. Suddenly, a single sound broke the spell: It was the call of the canyon wren that I had been waiting to hear for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Indulge your sweet tooth with endless ice cream flavors on Saturday and Sunday at Penn's Landing while supporting a good cause at the 15th annual Super Scooper All-You-Can-Eat Ice Cream Festival. From noon to 6 p.m., under one huge pavilion, taste samples from your favorite ice cream companies including Breyers, Turkey Hill, Häagen-Dazs, Ben & Jerry, Philadelphia Water Ice Company, and more. Proceeds will go to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to help fight pediatric leukemia. The event is presented by the Joshua Kahan Fund.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"My Best Day Ever" was the theme of this year's national Doodle 4 Google contest, and when Sewell seventh grader Maria Iannone heard back in April that her artwork had been selected as her state's winner, that was a very good day indeed. This week was even better. On Tuesday, at a fete for the state finalists at Google's Manhattan offices, Maria learned she was one of five national winners. "I was kind of overwhelmed, but I wasn't really freaking out or anything," Maria said Wednesday, remembering her name being called as the winner in the sixth-and-seventh-grade age group.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forget the crayons, paintbrushes, and colored pencils. The path to becoming an accomplished artist - or at least to a $30,000 college scholarship - is now etched on a tablet. That's what 12-year-old Maria Iannone, a seventh grader at Chestnut Ridge Middle School in Washington Township, used for her entry in Google's nationwide K-12 "Doodle 4 Google" contest. This year's theme: "My Best Day Ever. " Her doodle shows the silhouette of a person using a telescope to gaze at a yellow half-moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Celebrate the science of small on Saturday at the Delaware Museum of Natural History's NanoDay. Through hands-on activities, visitors will learn about molecules through the field of science called nano, meaning one-billionth. Guests can conduct cool experiments, including creating invisibility by bending light. Explore the world of nano for fashion purposes by making a bracelet with UV color-changing beads. Learn about words mathematically created by the digits 0 and 1 by writing your name in binary code with a pencil or magnet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Explore the rain forests of South America at Delaware Museum of Natural History's "Rain Forest Adventure" exhibition through Jan. 6. The exhibition will allow visitors to learn though activities such as becoming a research assistant, wearing a lab coat, and using microscopes and slides to examine bugs from the rain forest, including a blue iridescent butterfly and other creatures. Via video display, families will meet children who live in the rain forest as they discuss the challenges they face.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A paleontologist who undertook a major excavation of ice age fossils of mammoths and mastodons in Colorado was named the next director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History on Thursday. Kirk Johnson, currently chief curator and vice president of research at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, will take command of one of the nation's most-visited museums in late October. As the Smithsonian's largest museum on the National Mall, the natural history museum has about 300 resident scientists and holds more than 126 million specimens and artifacts, making it the largest natural history collection in the world.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is the nation's oldest natural history museum, and this month marks its 200th anniversary. On March 21, 1812, John Speakman, Jacob Gilliams, and others met to form an "academy" for the study of natural history, and "for the encouragement and cultivation of the sciences, and the advancement of useful learning. " Its original headquarters was 121 N. Second St. About three years later, the academy moved to larger quarters on Arch Street, between Front Street and Second.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Christina Pellegrini INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beyond the iconic staircase of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, or the marble columns of the Franklin Institute, museumgoers can find anything from dentists' chairs to Three Stooges memorabilia in Philly's quirky and unusual collections. There are enough museums and exhibits around to please Philadelphians of all types, no matter how offbeat their interest may be. For the science-minded. The Wagner Free Institute of Science, at 1700 W. Montgomery Ave., not only offers valuable natural history lessons, but retains the original 1891 layout designed by Joseph Leidy, one of the museum's most prominent curators.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Here's a factoid, courtesy of the Internet Movie Database: Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian marks the second time that Napoleon Bonaparte and Abraham Lincoln have appeared in the same film. The first? Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure. Which, by the way, is a vastly more meaningful moviegoing experience than this knee-jerk sequel to the surprise 2006 Ben Stiller smash. A super-size rehash of the original - transplanted from New York's Museum of Natural History to the sprawling mall of museums run by the Smithsonian in Washington - this family-friendly vehicle once again stars Stiller as the museum guard who communes with objects and artifacts on display after the doors close for the day. Except this time, as Night at the Museum - Part Duh begins, Stiller's Larry Daley is no longer employed as a guard.
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