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Natural History Museum

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NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A paleontologist who undertook a major excavation of ice age fossils of mammoths and mastodons in Colorado was named the next director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History on Thursday. Kirk Johnson, currently chief curator and vice president of research at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, will take command of one of the nation's most-visited museums in late October. As the Smithsonian's largest museum on the National Mall, the natural history museum has about 300 resident scientists and holds more than 126 million specimens and artifacts, making it the largest natural history collection in the world.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Harrisburg produces plenty that is oversize, reptilian, and even prehistoric. But rarely is any of it as welcome as Daemonosaurus chauliodus , a newly identified species of dinosaur discovered by researchers at the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Fossil preparer Kevin Dermody found the dinosaur's skull in a mudstone block from New Mexico while working at the museum in 2004. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Natural History had loaned the rock to the State Museum for examination in its "Dino Lab," which allows visitors to watch technicians at work unearthing fossils.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012
Prolific children's author Jan Brett - more than 30 books so far - has another one out. It's called Mossy (G.P. Putnam's Sons, $17.99), and it's an unusual love story starring an eponymous turtle with a garden growing on her back. Here's the plot: Mossy falls in love with a male turtle named Scoot, then is taken away from Lilypad Pond by Dr. Carolina, a biologist who makes Mossy the main attraction at her natural history museum. It's all very exciting, until Dr. Carolina's niece Tory notices that Mossy, while enjoying the attention, is pining for Scoot.
NEWS
November 2, 2006 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Academy of Natural Sciences pinned its hopes yesterday on a new president named William Brown, a lawyer and environmentalist whose background - first as a zoologist and more recently a dynamic fund-raiser - meshes with the museum's own distinguished history and current financial troubles. Since 2001, Brown has presided over the Bishop Museum in Hawaii, where he reversed budget deficits and expanded the century-old natural history museum. "He stood out because his experience at Bishop is very similar to what's going on here," said R. James Macaleer, chairman of the board of trustees at the academy, which is nearly two centuries old. "He's no shrinking violet when it comes to getting out and telling people why philanthropy for his cause makes sense.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Trustees of the Delaware Museum of Natural History are negotiating with four prospective buyers for 232 acres of land the museum owns next to the estate of its founder, convicted murderer John E. du Pont. Representatives of the museum remain tight-lipped about the negotiations and would not reveal prospective buyers' identities. But Scott Nelson, president of the board of trustees, confirmed that proposed uses for the land include a golf course, a residential development and a combination of the two. The property has been on the market since summer, when the trustees solicited proposals from developers and conservation groups, asking them what they would do with the land.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two of Philadelphia's leading museums are losing their directors. James L. Powell, president and chief executive officer of the Franklin Institute, announced yesterday that he will resign to become president of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County beginning July 1. The University Museum also announced this week that its longtime director, Robert H. Dyson, 66, would step down July 1 to concentrate full-time on his research interests....
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | By ROXANA PIERSON
I felt like Chicken Little a couple weeks ago, craning my neck to see if something was, indeed, falling from the sky. Hark! Was that a snowflake or merely a bit of precipitant pollution? The sky was dark and dreary, my bones felt old and weary, but nothing happened. . . . Where is the snow, anyway? This winter it's been easy to believe the greenhouse theory. As the weeks drag by without any sign of snow, I'm beginning to wonder if we're just not going to get any this year.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Everything you ever wanted to know about welding but were too unglued to ask will be on view at a museum that will exist for two days only - tomorrow and Thursday - during a meeting of the American Welding Society. The group is meeting this week at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The society will be celebrating its 75th anniversary and for the occasion, in addition to its customary trade show for the industry only, it's inviting the public to a free exhibit tracing the development of welding from ancient Persia to current space-age technology.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the tourist world's best-known discount programs, the London White Card, has a revised name and slightly expanded lineup of attractions. It's now the GoSee card and it opens the door to 16 London cultural sites. Recently added were the BBC Experience, an interactive exhibition in the home of the British Broadcasting Corp., and the Tower Bridge Experience, an exhibit located in the tower of the bridge itself, with views from 140 feet above the Thames. The card, which retains a reference to its traditional name, allows unlimited admission to a wide range of London museums and galleries.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Science poses enormous and exciting challenges, says Dennis Wint, the new president and chief executive officer of the Franklin Institute, and he is enormously excited about moving to Philadelphia to meet them. Or rather, moving back to Philadelphia. Wint, a science educator whose appointment to the job was announced yesterday, spent five years - from 1977 to 1982 - at the Academy of Natural Sciences, the Franklin Institute's neighbor on the Parkway, first as director of education and later as vice president.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In spring 2008, Kevin was studying political science and Julia was just about to finish her marketing degree at Penn State. Her roommate Leigha was dating his roommate Larry. Julia had no date for the formal. Leigha suggested she and Kevin would like each other. "I decided to take her up on it," said Julia, whose family moved from Ukraine to Northeast Philadelphia when she was 6. "I told her to see if he could go. " A night out with friends and a pretty girl seemed like fun to Kevin, who grew up in Langhorne.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Explore the rain forests of South America at Delaware Museum of Natural History's "Rain Forest Adventure" exhibition through Jan. 6. The exhibition will allow visitors to learn though activities such as becoming a research assistant, wearing a lab coat, and using microscopes and slides to examine bugs from the rain forest, including a blue iridescent butterfly and other creatures. Via video display, families will meet children who live in the rain forest as they discuss the challenges they face.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012
Prolific children's author Jan Brett - more than 30 books so far - has another one out. It's called Mossy (G.P. Putnam's Sons, $17.99), and it's an unusual love story starring an eponymous turtle with a garden growing on her back. Here's the plot: Mossy falls in love with a male turtle named Scoot, then is taken away from Lilypad Pond by Dr. Carolina, a biologist who makes Mossy the main attraction at her natural history museum. It's all very exciting, until Dr. Carolina's niece Tory notices that Mossy, while enjoying the attention, is pining for Scoot.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A paleontologist who undertook a major excavation of ice age fossils of mammoths and mastodons in Colorado was named the next director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History on Thursday. Kirk Johnson, currently chief curator and vice president of research at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, will take command of one of the nation's most-visited museums in late October. As the Smithsonian's largest museum on the National Mall, the natural history museum has about 300 resident scientists and holds more than 126 million specimens and artifacts, making it the largest natural history collection in the world.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Harrisburg produces plenty that is oversize, reptilian, and even prehistoric. But rarely is any of it as welcome as Daemonosaurus chauliodus , a newly identified species of dinosaur discovered by researchers at the State Museum of Pennsylvania. Fossil preparer Kevin Dermody found the dinosaur's skull in a mudstone block from New Mexico while working at the museum in 2004. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Natural History had loaned the rock to the State Museum for examination in its "Dino Lab," which allows visitors to watch technicians at work unearthing fossils.
NEWS
January 15, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stomping the box-office competition To tango is human. To stomp 'n' step, divine. Ample proof for that adage came yesterday, with the preliminary box-office report that Stomp the Yard, the Columbus Short-starring flick about a step competition between two frats, was the top film in the nation, debuting with a weekend take of $22 mil. Ben Stiller and Dick Van Dyke couldn't keep the natural history museum solvent any longer: Night at the...
NEWS
November 2, 2006 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Academy of Natural Sciences pinned its hopes yesterday on a new president named William Brown, a lawyer and environmentalist whose background - first as a zoologist and more recently a dynamic fund-raiser - meshes with the museum's own distinguished history and current financial troubles. Since 2001, Brown has presided over the Bishop Museum in Hawaii, where he reversed budget deficits and expanded the century-old natural history museum. "He stood out because his experience at Bishop is very similar to what's going on here," said R. James Macaleer, chairman of the board of trustees at the academy, which is nearly two centuries old. "He's no shrinking violet when it comes to getting out and telling people why philanthropy for his cause makes sense.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Philadelphia welcomes 6,000 geologists for their annual convention today, here's an ironic coincidence: The city's natural-history museum is abandoning the rocks-and-minerals business. Trustees of the cash-strapped Academy of Natural Sciences voted Tuesday to sell more than 15,000 minerals and gems that hadn't been cleaned or displayed for decades. Workers then began boxing up specimens for an unnamed private dealer, acting academy president Ian Davison said. "To me, it's a very sad day when this kind of thing happens," said Stephen G. Wells, president of the Geological Society of America, which will meet through Wednesday at the Convention Center.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Natural History Museum in Princeton University's Guyot Hall, "interactivity" - that driving force for curators everywhere - is limited to reading descriptions that someone typed on an index card. For those who have an affection for this hall of wonders, that is part of the charm. "It's a museum of a museum," said Lincoln Hollister, a professor of geology. But to the university, the museum - with its eclectic collection of fossils, bones, and jarred and stuffed specimens collected by faculty and students over the years - is an anachronism.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the tourist world's best-known discount programs, the London White Card, has a revised name and slightly expanded lineup of attractions. It's now the GoSee card and it opens the door to 16 London cultural sites. Recently added were the BBC Experience, an interactive exhibition in the home of the British Broadcasting Corp., and the Tower Bridge Experience, an exhibit located in the tower of the bridge itself, with views from 140 feet above the Thames. The card, which retains a reference to its traditional name, allows unlimited admission to a wide range of London museums and galleries.
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