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NEWS
August 30, 1997
The UPS strike raised questions about the nature of work and the changing relationships among employers, managers and employees. Tell us about your job or jobs. What's changed since you entered the workforce and what have you had to do to accommodate those changes? If you're just starting out in the working world, what are you expecting, and what are you doing to make it happen? Send your essays to Community Voices/On Work at the address above.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | JOANNE RIM/ DAILY NEWS
The Cheltenham Art Center's adult painting class took a field trip to the bank of the Schuylkill Monday. Some of the class members took as inspiration the natural work of art, the river scene, as subject matters. At right, Myra Ladenson works on "Patterns," partially inspired by the bridge above her.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Nicole Lockley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nagewa Robertson hopped from one shaky rock to another, trying to keep her feet out of the swiftly moving creek water. Nagewa, 13, was used to the streets of North Philadelphia but not the woods of nearby Fairmount Park. "Look, it's a baby chipmunk," Nagewa said as she walked through the park with 13 other youths from the Hank Gathers Recreation Center at 25th and Diamond Streets. "I know it was a chipmunk. I just saw it run that way," she said excitedly. The group walked from the center to the park entrance at 33d Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
The 100th episode of Nature, expanded tonight to 90 minutes for a program of highlights dubbed Great Moments From Nature (Ch. 12, starting at 6:55 p.m. to make room for lots of pledge breaks), offers an occasion to ponder the enduring appeal of animal shows. What is so endlessly fascinating about scenes of fuzzy ducklings, ponderous hippopotamuses and bug-eyed bugs going about the mundane business of existence? The obvious answer is: We ain't them. And yet as you watch, you realize, hey, we are sort of like them.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
Old-school hip-hop from the East Orange, N.J., outfit led by Treach that's still best known for their 1991 crossover hit, "O.P.P. " Sunday at the Theatre of Living Arts.
LIVING
September 20, 1987 | By Constance Garcia-Barrio, Special to The Inquirer
Gobots, Masters of the Universe and other high-tech heroes may have captivated kids' imaginations these days, but there are plenty of reasons why children should at least be introduced to the natural world. Many children spend 90 percent or more of their time in a man-made environment, says Pete Kurtz, a naturalist at the Pennypack Environmental Center in Northeast Philadelphia. "Some children who come here are afraid of nature," says Kurtz. "They're afraid to sit on the ground.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel
More than two dozen diamondback terrapins, a threatened species, were released yesterday at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor. They had been raised by college interns, high school students and children in the Philadelphia Zoo's Apprentice and Zoological Summer Camp Program.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | JOANNE RIM/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the Cheltenham Art Center's adult painting class work along the banks of the Schuykill River Monday. Some took as inspiration the natural work of art, the river scene, as subject matters. Others just painted what came naturally to them.
NEWS
December 3, 1986
Joseph Elias may refer to the Palestine Liberation Organization as guerrilla freedom fighters (Letter to the Editor, Nov. 24) but nowhere in the history of mankind have "freedom fighters" entered airports, Olympic Games, ocean liners, airplanes and buses to wantonly slaughter men, women and children, time and time again. Nowhere in history have "freedom fighters" used hospitals and civilian apartment houses to house their armament, tanks, ammunition, etc. The cry of wanting their homeland back is a sham.
NEWS
November 21, 2005 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Gerald loves outdoor activities, especially anything that involves nature. When the 9-year-old is inside, you can frequently find him absorbed in playing video and board games. He also enjoys going to the movies. Gerald gets along well with other children his age and makes friends easily. His social worker says he is well-mannered and a pleasure to be around. A good student, Gerald is enrolled in special-education classes where he focuses on strengthening his reading and language-arts skills.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Kingsessing - with its paneled homes with metal awnings, trolley cables stretching over asphalt streets, and weeds peeking out from concrete cracks - is hardly the picture of nature. But the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has a plan to make Kingsessing a model for green space. Working with groups such as Philadelphia University's landscape architecture program and the grassroots organization Empowered CDC, Fish and Wildlife has identified eight spaces to turn into community green space.
NEWS
July 5, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Pipeline policy flawed A commentary about a U.S. House-approved energy bill meant to streamline regulatory approval of natural-gas pipelines suggested that the bureaucratic hoops faced by energy companies are effectively a "backdoor ban" on fossil-fuel production ("Energy bill to boost jobs," June 24). As a Philadelphian worried about the impact of fossil-fuel emissions on our environment, I support legislation that targets our nation's carbon consumption. A policy that places a steadily rising carbon fee on fossil fuels is a good place to start.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITER
UPDATE : At about 9:20 p.m., as the rain intensified, the Philly Pops announced through social media that it had to cancel its concert appearance at the Art Museum to protect its instruments from damage. Officials of Welcome America, however, said the fireworks would happen at 10 p.m. as scheduled – regardless of the weather. EARLIER: Nature might be planning a fireworks show of its own Monday night, meteorologists are warning, threatening human firework displays all over the region.In addition, heavy rains were expected overnight, and a flash-flood was posted for between 12:01 a.m. and 10 a.m. Tuesday, with the National Weather Service saying that some areas could get hit with 3 to 4 inches of rain.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
In 1868, the Academy of Natural Sciences mounted the first-ever full dinosaur skeleton. A century and a half later, it's forcing the dinos out of extinction with state-of-the-art animatronics that mimic their actions, looks, and sounds from millions of years ago. "Back in 1868, no one had ever conceived of being able to see a skeleton of an animal like a dinosaur, and just to see the skeleton was a wonder of the world," said Ted Daeschler, the...
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, STAFF WRITER
On a wet afternoon at Crosswicks Wildlife Sanctuary in Abington Township, Leigh Altadonna walked the muddy trails, searching through binoculars for a breeding pair of wood thrushes, a species in decline, and remembering a childhood day 60 years ago when he saw a robin in the woods behind his Glenside home, carrying mud from a pond to build its nest. He's been a fervent birder ever since. "It doesn't take an exotic bird to get you into this," he said. "For me, it was a robin. " Altadonna, 67, is a benevolent guiding spirit at Crosswicks - Pennsylvania's only National Audubon Society sanctuary - rambling through its 13 acres as knowingly as he once walked the woods of his youth, eyes and ears attuned to the moving tapestry of birds from the forest floor to the tree canopy 100 feet above.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Dede Long, 65, past director of the Briar Bush Nature Center in Abington, who while leading nature hikes taught children to look under rocks for salamanders and not to disturb the fox kits nestled in their den near the trail, has died. After fighting cancer for 11 years, Ms. Long died Saturday, April 23, at the retirement home she shared with her husband, Gary Peil, on St. Simons Island, Ga. As word of her passing spread north, the center reacted with a statement on its website.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Ten years ago, my then-fiance started a relationship with another woman and then broke up with me to continue that. I wasn't exciting enough or pretty enough and other insulting reasons. We never spoke again. At the time, it was really crushing. By the time I found someone else, it was too late for me to have children with my own eggs, and it also took years for me to recover from the whole thing. I have moved on. I married someone wonderful and had a beautiful child through egg donation.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A woman whose body was found on a Society Hill street on May 7 died of natural causes, the Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Lorraine Grant, 58, suffered from heart disease, Jeff Moran, the office's spokesman, said. She was found unresponsive on South Fifth Street near Lombard about 10:35 a.m. Saturday, May 7, and was pronounced dead 10 minutes later by medics at the scene, police have said. shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592 @julieshawphilly  
NEWS
May 20, 2016
ISSUE | ADOPTION Pa., make searches for natural parents easier Thank you for the touching letter by a woman who is looking for her birth mother ("Finally, a chance to find my birth mom," Sunday). I, too, am looking for my birth mother, and my sister. I encourage Pennsylvania legislators to follow New Jersey's lead in making birth certificates available and to go further by making available the medical histories of biological parents. Like the letter writer, I feel alone in not being able to find my biological family, and I hope the day will come when it will be possible.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Hydraulically fractured wells now produce about two-thirds of the nation's natural gas output, up from less than 7 percent in 2000, according to an analysis released Thursday by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The EIA's report follows on a March analysis that showed fracking accounts for about half of current U.S. crude oil production. The last decade's dramatic increases of domestic gas and crude oil production from fracking has contributed to a decine in energy prices.
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