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NEWS
August 30, 1997
The UPS strike raised questions about the nature of work and the changing relationships among employers, managers and employees. Tell us about your job or jobs. What's changed since you entered the workforce and what have you had to do to accommodate those changes? If you're just starting out in the working world, what are you expecting, and what are you doing to make it happen? Send your essays to Community Voices/On Work at the address above.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | JOANNE RIM/ DAILY NEWS
The Cheltenham Art Center's adult painting class took a field trip to the bank of the Schuylkill Monday. Some of the class members took as inspiration the natural work of art, the river scene, as subject matters. At right, Myra Ladenson works on "Patterns," partially inspired by the bridge above her.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Nicole Lockley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nagewa Robertson hopped from one shaky rock to another, trying to keep her feet out of the swiftly moving creek water. Nagewa, 13, was used to the streets of North Philadelphia but not the woods of nearby Fairmount Park. "Look, it's a baby chipmunk," Nagewa said as she walked through the park with 13 other youths from the Hank Gathers Recreation Center at 25th and Diamond Streets. "I know it was a chipmunk. I just saw it run that way," she said excitedly. The group walked from the center to the park entrance at 33d Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
The 100th episode of Nature, expanded tonight to 90 minutes for a program of highlights dubbed Great Moments From Nature (Ch. 12, starting at 6:55 p.m. to make room for lots of pledge breaks), offers an occasion to ponder the enduring appeal of animal shows. What is so endlessly fascinating about scenes of fuzzy ducklings, ponderous hippopotamuses and bug-eyed bugs going about the mundane business of existence? The obvious answer is: We ain't them. And yet as you watch, you realize, hey, we are sort of like them.
LIVING
September 20, 1987 | By Constance Garcia-Barrio, Special to The Inquirer
Gobots, Masters of the Universe and other high-tech heroes may have captivated kids' imaginations these days, but there are plenty of reasons why children should at least be introduced to the natural world. Many children spend 90 percent or more of their time in a man-made environment, says Pete Kurtz, a naturalist at the Pennypack Environmental Center in Northeast Philadelphia. "Some children who come here are afraid of nature," says Kurtz. "They're afraid to sit on the ground.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel
More than two dozen diamondback terrapins, a threatened species, were released yesterday at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor. They had been raised by college interns, high school students and children in the Philadelphia Zoo's Apprentice and Zoological Summer Camp Program.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | JOANNE RIM/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the Cheltenham Art Center's adult painting class work along the banks of the Schuykill River Monday. Some took as inspiration the natural work of art, the river scene, as subject matters. Others just painted what came naturally to them.
NEWS
December 3, 1986
Joseph Elias may refer to the Palestine Liberation Organization as guerrilla freedom fighters (Letter to the Editor, Nov. 24) but nowhere in the history of mankind have "freedom fighters" entered airports, Olympic Games, ocean liners, airplanes and buses to wantonly slaughter men, women and children, time and time again. Nowhere in history have "freedom fighters" used hospitals and civilian apartment houses to house their armament, tanks, ammunition, etc. The cry of wanting their homeland back is a sham.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
Nature outfoxed technology Tuesday, reminding us, once again, of our limitations. As of Monday's late news, forecasters predicted an inch or two of snow for rush hour. The National Weather Service's new supercomputer had tracked an approaching storm safely out to sea. Then, wham! By dawn, it's snowing 2 inches an hour; cars are skidding and schools are closing. How refreshing to be caught unawares. Just as four-wheel drive cannot suspend the laws of physics (no matter what some drivers seem to think)
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
America's early modernist artists usually have been examined through a European lens - who was inspired by Cezanne, who by Matisse, and so on. As demonstrated in a recent traveling exhibition, "The Advent of Postmodernism," it's indeed difficult to divorce these artists from contemporaneous European influences. Yet a new exhibition at the Allentown Art Museum, "Modernist Idylls: Nature and the Avant-Garde," seeks to do exactly that. Associate curator Christopher B. Fulton developed the show to demonstrate that American artists shared a passionate commitment to nature that distinguishes early American modernism from that of Europe.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf announced Wednesday that a new task force will formulate "policies, guidelines and tools" governing pipelines that deliver natural gas from the Marcellus Shale formation. Wolf said the Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force will include representatives from state agencies, the legislature, federal and local governments, the pipeline and natural-gas industries, and environmental groups. John Quigley, acting secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, will serve as chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Yuck! The 3D "Animal Grossology" exhibit, based on Sylvia Branzei's children's book series Grossology , showcases the stinkiest, smelliest experiences nature has to offer. Entertain your inquisitive nature at the exhibit's Cart of Curiosity with themes such as "Ew, That Comes From Where?" and see the icky origins of popular items such as honey, perfume, and even certain types coffee. At the "Patterns of the Poop" exhibit, you can take rubber recreations and match the end product to the animal from which it came.
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Amazing animal sculptures made from recycled material will be on display at the Philadelphia Zoo through Oct. 31. "Second Nature" features works by 12 artists from around the globe (including some from Philly) using recycled and repurposed materials, like a pink eight-foot crocodile made entirely of chewing gum. Philly artist Leo Sewell shows off his 175-pound rhinoceros sculpted from 250 silver serving trays collected from scrap piles, junk sales, and curbsides. Sculptures range from bunnies and gorillas to flowers made from a car hood.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By E.J. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Fratanduono ran the 100 meters for the first time last Saturday at the Bensalem Invitational. The Archbishop Ryan senior didn't use starting blocks. It wasn't a preference or a superstition - he just didn't know how to use them. The first-time sprinter ran 11.1 seconds in the preliminary round. Before the finals, Fratanduono received a quick lesson on the blocks from coach Ed Ulmer. He responded by breaking Bill Bell's 43-year-old school record with a time of 10.83 seconds.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Nope, you weren't imagining it. One in four teens - and perhaps all of them at your house - say they are online "almost constantly" via a smartphone, and most of the rest go online at least daily from a mobile device, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. Teens are avid adopters of social-media sites, where their use of Instagram and Snapchat is giving Facebook a run for its money, according to the study, due out Thursday. Many also use messaging services such as Kik and WhatsApp to communicate, often favoring photos and video over text, says study author Amanda Lenhart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
FX has given up Thursday night to two very different giants of comedy. Louis CK returns in his comedy Louie , which CK writes, directs, and edits, for a fifth season. Billy Crystal and Josh Gad (check out those box-office returns on Frozen and Book of Mormon and try to debate Gad's cachet) will begin in their own attempt with The Comedians . Both Louie and The Comedians are really about what happens backstage, after the lights go down and the audience goes home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
For artist Patrick Dougherty, mistakes are always happy accidents. The sculptor works with natural elements to create grand, site-specific sculptures. For three weeks, Dougherty set up camp at the Morris Arboretum to create A Waltz in the Woods from willow branches. "It's a smooth waltz where these little towers use this meadow to celebrate," he said. Morris will mark the debut of Dougherty's most recent work with a grand-opening event Saturday, including a guided sculpture tour and a craft event for kids.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite Philadelphia City Council's "unqualified" rejection nine years ago of a terminal for liquefied natural gas, the city is once again flirting with the money-making allure of LNG. Several entrepreneurs are promoting plans to increase LNG production at the Philadelphia Gas Works plant in Port Richmond, hoping to capitalize on growing interest in creating an energy hub linked to the Marcellus Shale natural gas boom. The most ambitious plan floated publicly is a $2.1 billion proposal to expand the Port Richmond plant's capacity to export LNG to European markets.
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