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Nature Center

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NEWS
July 13, 1995 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Silver Lake Center is brimming with activities and camps for children this month. The center is offering three sessions of Touch & Grow Camp, designed for children ages 4 and 5, during July and August. Children in the weeklong camp will learn about birds, ponds, bugs, plants and more. The next session starts on Monday. Additional sessions begin the weeks of July 31 and Aug. 14. The camps are held from 9:30 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday, and cost $30. Pre-registration is required.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware Valley Concerned Citizens Preservation Inc. is planning today to start transforming a former office building into a nature center at a site considered "the only natural environment left in Paulsboro," a spokeswoman said. The nonprofit, charitable organization is awaiting a response from the state Green Acres program regarding its application to acquire 63 acres of wetlands valued at $600,000 near the railroad tracks on Mantua Avenue. The field, with two vacant parcels, lies near Mantua Creek.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nature Center of Charlestown is selling eight varieties of trees in an effort to raise money for its land-management plan. The center is sponsoring the tree sale with the National Arbor Day Foundation of Nebraska City, Neb. The foundation is a nonprofit organization that promotes the planting, preservation and appreciation of trees and offers a special program for elementary schools supporting its goals. Patricia R. O'Connell, senior environmental educator at the nature center, said the tree sale coincided with Gov. Thornburgh's proclamation that 1986 is Pennsylvania Year of the Forest.
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | By Bob Neubauer, Special to The Inquirer
George Carmichael's slow footsteps came to a halt on the marshy dirt path as he pointed off into the dark Delhaas Woods. "Lycopodium," he said, motioning toward a carpet of scale-leafed club moss creeping along the forest floor. "Their ancient relatives grew tree-sized and formed the first forests on the planet. " But nearby in this addition to Bucks County's Silver Lake Nature Center, less pristine surprises awaited. The shell of a car sat rusting amid a tangle of overgrown grass and empty beer cans.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | By Inga Sandvoss, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
January is a lucky month for children between the ages of 3 and 9 at the Delaware Nature Society's Ashland Nature Center, just south of the Pennsylvania state line. A number of environmentally educational programs are on the center's agenda, and all you have to do is register one week in advance to take part. The programs attempt to "get the children to become discoverers themselves," said Karen Travers, supervisor of education for the Nature Society's programs. "Programs for the younger children allow them to explore the natural world through their five senses.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The couple moved in maybe five, six years ago. They built a lodge on Stone Valley Lake, raised a family and pretty much kept to themselves. "Normally, you'd only see one of them out at a time," said John Drummond, who works nearby at the Shaver's Creek Environmental Center. "And that was usually at night. " Then strange things started to happen. Campers reported hearing the sound of trees being cut down at night. One day, the beginnings of a crude structure took shape on the opposite side of the lake.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
For three days, purple, green and brown smoke rose from the burning field, the air smelled acrid and 120 firefighters battled a blaze involving unknown chemicals. It was 1983, and an annex to the closed-down Folcroft Landfill was on fire. The only problem was, no one was sure of what was burning. The state, the federal government, even the previous owner of the landfill - no one seemed to know what lay beneath the soil. The uncertainty continues, but last week federal officials eliminated one major worry: Whatever lies buried there, it doesn't seem to be leaching far into the Tinicum National Environmental Center.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To facilitate a $2 million restoration of the Blackwood Lake area, Gov. Whitman this month signed a bill to transfer a half-acre plot of land from Washington Township in Gloucester County to Gloucester Township in Camden County. The Consumer NJ Water Co., which owned the land, last year donated it to the Blackwood Lake Advisory Committee, a six-year-old group formed to spruce up the former resort area in Gloucester Township. With a flick of her pen, Whitman changed county and township lines of demarcation.
NEWS
November 30, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the new volunteer board president at Riverbend Environmental Education Center, banker and retired dentist Martin Phillips is directing his business skills down another path. "With all the development going on in this area, it's really important that children are sensitive to their surroundings and environment," he said. "What we try to do is make them aware of what clean air is and where water comes from and what little critters live in there and what they're doing. " Riverbend is a 30-acre nature preserve at the end of Spring Mill Road in Gladwyne.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Duffy didn't even hear the warning crack! of the tree branch breaking. But when it fell just behind where he was clearing the snow at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, the facilities manager ran inside for another piece of equipment: A hard hat. Not long after, the Roxborough center posted a notice on its door and its website: Trails closed. Even as temperatures warm and snows melt, the region's nature centers and others with big tracts of woods are still dealing with the tree carnage.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
At this time last year, Rich Chichester said, "there was a lot of venom" in the classroom at the Rancocas Nature Center - and it wasn't from the harmless orange corn snake curled up in the corner. It was from a group of local residents, municipal officials, parents, and volunteers determined to keep the center open after the New Jersey Audubon Society abruptly announced its closure, citing a $55,000 funding gap. The Friends of Rancocas Nature Center quickly coalesced, and over the next six months arranged a public-private partnership to take ownership of the center, where children and adults can hike, birdwatch, and track wildlife on 210 acres of state park.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nets in hand, scooping tadpoles from a frog pond and squealing at dragonflies, Chris Reeh and Isabella Vilic had no idea they were making childhood memories. That's how it is when you're 6 and 7 - especially at summer camp. But the pond, the bee meadow, the surrounding streams, the hiking trails, the child garden brimming with honeysuckle and chocolate mint, and that field where children squish mud between their toes when it rains, nearly became a vanished memory this year. "We got a call from the New Jersey Audubon Society in December," Toni Price recalled this week, perched on a wooden picnic table at the Rancocas Nature Center in Westampton.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunday was to supposed to be the last day for Rancocas Nature Center and Park in Westampton, forced to close after 35 years for lack of funding. But the Cub Scouts visiting the 130-acre site Friday had no thoughts of farewell as they labored on their forestry merit badges. "We're still here," said John Courtney, a volunteer since the center opened in 1978. Projecting a $55,000 deficit at the site in 2013, the New Jersey Audubon Society, which has operated it for years, announced in December it would close March 31. This week, however, the Burlington County freeholder board announced a shared-services plan to keep the center and its trails open.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013
Special Events Flower Show Black Tie Preview Party Early look at displays; food stations, cocktails & award presentations. Convention Center, 1101 Arch St. www.thepennsylvaniahorticulturalsociety.org . $400; $200 ages 21-40. 3/1. 7-10 pm. Germantown White House Exhibits Interactive exhibits featuring George Washington's family & household. Germantown White House (formerly Deshler-Morris House), 5442 Germantown Ave.; 215-965-2305. Healthcare Job Fair For healthcare professionals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Ken Finch delights in asking people to recall happy childhood moments spent outdoors. Invariably, they involve nature: climbing a favorite tree, wading in a stream, catching fireflies in a jar. But this works only when his audience is older than about 30. If they're younger, they were born after a divide - the time childhood in America changed. For the worse. No longer did they run outdoors on a Saturday, coming home only when the streetlights went on. More and more, they stayed indoors.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rancocas Nature Center - which until a few days ago was slated to close New Year's Day - has been given a reprieve that Burlington County residents and officials hope will become permanent. In a cost-cutting move, the New Jersey Audubon Society, which operates the 135-acre facility in Westampton Township near Mount Holly, announced last month that it would shut the 35-year-old center along with the Weis Ecology Center in Ringwood, Passaic County. The group also said it would make its Nature Center of Cape May a seasonal facility by closing it to the public until April 15, 2013.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - The New Jersey Audubon Society, which for 115 years has exhorted nature-seekers to interact with the physical world, is expanding its virtual horizons in a budgetary move officials say is born of Darwinian necessity. "To survive, we need to adapt," said Eric Stiles, president of the nonprofit nature and conservation group, which has no connection with the National Audubon Society. Effective Jan. 1, the organization will close two facilities - including the 135-acre Rancocas Nature Center in Mount Holly - and modify programming at nine others.
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