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Navajo Nation

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NEWS
August 7, 1989 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The medicine men have purified the killing place, and Jimmy Dickson and Arnold Begay have been buried, but the cherished hozro, the harmony that gives meaning to Navajo life, is gone. In its place are scores of police, death threats and talk of assassinations. The Navajo Nation, deeply divided over the ouster of its tribal leader amid corruption accusations, has seen a long-running political feud turn violent. Clubs and bullets have replaced angry words, and many of the 187,000 who live on the windswept red mesas of the impoverished Navajo reservation fear that the cycle of violence is not over.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Navajo Nation has filed a federal lawsuit against Urban Outfitters Inc., alleging that the Philadelphia-based retailer committed trademark infringement by marketing and selling products that use the American Indian tribe's marks and names without a licensing or vendor agreement. In the civil action filed in U.S. District Court in New Mexico, the tribe and its commercial subsidiaries seek damages and an order stopping Urban Outfitters from using the names   "Navajo   " and   "Navaho " and marks on goods that compete with its own trademarked jewelry, housewares, and clothing.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
PAGE, Ariz. - Authorities say a Navajo Nation police officer has been shot and killed while answering a domestic-violence call in a small community south of Page, Ariz. Officials tell KRQE-TV in Albuquerque that Sgt. Darrell Curley died at the hospital in Page after being shot in the town of Kaibito on Saturday night. Another officer was treated and released. The tribe issued a statement to the station saying President Ben Shelly and Vice President Rex Lee Jim were praying for Curley's family.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2012 | By Ellen Scolnic, For The Inquirer
The Navajo Reservation covers more than 27,000 square miles, stretching across four states, yet most visitors to the Southwest simply drive through it. "The rez" is on the way to the Grand Canyon, on the way to Lake Powell, and on the way to Monument Valley. But if you decide, as we did, to stop at a few places on the rez, you'll remember forever the people, their stories, and the astounding canyons, mesas, and natural beauty. Canyon de Chelly (pronounced d'SHAY) is three miles from Chinle, Ariz., and it's the center of the Navajo Nation in more ways than one. The steep sandstone walls of the canyons have been home to native peoples for more than 5,000 years.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | By Reed Karaim, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
A special Senate investigation of corruption on Indian reservations began to zero in yesterday on one man: Peter MacDonald, the flamboyant and controversial leader of the Navajo Nation, the country's largest Indian tribe. Five contractors said MacDonald regularly requested and received large amounts of cash, free use of a corporate airplane, trips to Las Vegas and numerous gifts from contractors trying to win construction contracts from the Navajos. MacDonald received at least $180,000 worth of money, goods and services in the last two years, according to witnesses on the fourth day of hearings by a special Senate committee that has spent a year investigating problems on Indian lands.
NEWS
February 7, 1989 | By Reed Karaim, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The son of Navajo leader Peter MacDonald Sr. said yesterday that his father asked him to provide a "cover story" when federal investigators began looking into gifts MacDonald received from friends who made more than $7 million on a questionable land sale to the tribe. The elder MacDonald received $25,000 and a leased BMW sedan after the tribe purchased a large ranch for $33.4 million from two of his friends. They had paid $26.2 million for it only hours earlier. The testimony from Peter "Rocky" MacDonald Jr. came during hearings by a special Senate committee that has spent a year checking allegations of widespread corruption on Indian reservations.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD JR., Daily News Staff Writer
A plan by a coal company for a strip-mining operation on an Arizona Indian reservation will mean the "total annihilation" of the Navajo Nation, a tribe spokesman said here yesterday. Larry Anderson, a full-blooded Navajo, told a crowd of about 200 at the Friends Center that more than 400 Navajo families, or about 16,000 people, must relocate by July 7 under a federal law that gives the Peabody Coal Co. the right to strip-mine 65,000 acres of Indian land at Big Mountain. Anderson said the land is sacred to both the Navajo and Hopi tribes that live there.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
By day, he is an accused criminal, sitting silently in a tribal courtroom, face to face with those who will decide whether he abused the Navajo Nation's highest office. By night, he is a candidate, charismatic and forceful, traveling hundreds of miles among the small villages of the country's largest Indian reservation in a campaign to regain the power that the Navajo Tribal Council stripped from him. By November, ousted Navajo chairman Peter MacDonald - viewed as the nation's most influential Indian leader until his suspension last year and the filing of 250 criminal charges against him - could be elected to a four-year term as president, or sentenced to a 24-year term as prisoner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Music is the universal language, and Philadelphia Orchestra cellist Udi Bar-David's mission is to keep reminding us. The Israeli musician has initiated an ongoing series of programs, "Intercultural Journeys," in which artists of widely different persuasions and roots collaborate. Over the past few years, the concerts have brought together Buddhist, Arab, Chinese, Jewish, Native American, African-American and jazz artists. Politics also plays a part in the project, with hopes of furthering understanding and peaceful coexistence through artistic dialogue and shared history.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
How would you incorporate a company, settle a fight with a tenant, or get a lawyer in a criminal case? Jargon-free legal information is at hand from a variety of sites and mobile apps. One of the best places to start is Nolo.com. Its extensive area for free legal information can give you detailed pointers on debt management, LGBT law, personal finance, and many other issues. The immigration-law page covers what to do if you think you qualify for deferral under the program that President Obama recently took executive action to expand.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
How would you incorporate a company, settle a fight with a tenant, or get a lawyer in a criminal case? Jargon-free legal information is at hand from a variety of sites and mobile apps. One of the best places to start is Nolo.com. Its extensive area for free legal information can give you detailed pointers on debt management, LGBT law, personal finance, and many other issues. The immigration-law page covers what to do if you think you qualify for deferral under the program that President Obama recently took executive action to expand.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his sixth - or perhaps seventh - pair of running shoes this year, David Wilcox, 15, ran from the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia to downtown Collingswood. His father, Brett, his aunt, Julie Stuehser, and the family dog, Jenna, ran along with him. Since January, David and Brett Wilcox have been running across the country, 20 miles a day, to promote awareness of genetically modified organisms and mandatory GMO labeling on products. The journey started in a Los Angeles suburb; the goal is to reach Ocean City, N.J., which could be accomplished in days.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
ON A slate-gray Sunday afternoon, soundtracked by the low-volume televisual hum of cutthroat playoff football, Lucio Palazzo knows he's struck the kitchen version of pay dirt. Pacing between the dining room and stove of his deep-in-South-Philly home, he declares as much to the eaters in earshot between enthusiastic mouthfuls. "This is definitely a situation. " After a few good-not-great results, the chef is rejoicing over a tremendous taco, but it's nothing like the tortillas he painstakingly plates up at his workplace.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2012 | By Ellen Scolnic, For The Inquirer
The Navajo Reservation covers more than 27,000 square miles, stretching across four states, yet most visitors to the Southwest simply drive through it. "The rez" is on the way to the Grand Canyon, on the way to Lake Powell, and on the way to Monument Valley. But if you decide, as we did, to stop at a few places on the rez, you'll remember forever the people, their stories, and the astounding canyons, mesas, and natural beauty. Canyon de Chelly (pronounced d'SHAY) is three miles from Chinle, Ariz., and it's the center of the Navajo Nation in more ways than one. The steep sandstone walls of the canyons have been home to native peoples for more than 5,000 years.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Navajo Nation has filed a federal lawsuit against Urban Outfitters Inc., alleging that the Philadelphia-based retailer committed trademark infringement by marketing and selling products that use the American Indian tribe's marks and names without a licensing or vendor agreement. In the civil action filed in U.S. District Court in New Mexico, the tribe and its commercial subsidiaries seek damages and an order stopping Urban Outfitters from using the names   "Navajo   " and   "Navaho " and marks on goods that compete with its own trademarked jewelry, housewares, and clothing.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
PAGE, Ariz. - Authorities say a Navajo Nation police officer has been shot and killed while answering a domestic-violence call in a small community south of Page, Ariz. Officials tell KRQE-TV in Albuquerque that Sgt. Darrell Curley died at the hospital in Page after being shot in the town of Kaibito on Saturday night. Another officer was treated and released. The tribe issued a statement to the station saying President Ben Shelly and Vice President Rex Lee Jim were praying for Curley's family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Music is the universal language, and Philadelphia Orchestra cellist Udi Bar-David's mission is to keep reminding us. The Israeli musician has initiated an ongoing series of programs, "Intercultural Journeys," in which artists of widely different persuasions and roots collaborate. Over the past few years, the concerts have brought together Buddhist, Arab, Chinese, Jewish, Native American, African-American and jazz artists. Politics also plays a part in the project, with hopes of furthering understanding and peaceful coexistence through artistic dialogue and shared history.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The reward for two survivalists suspected in the killing of a Colorado police officer and the wounding of three sheriff's deputies in the Four Corners region was increased to more than $300,000 yesterday. The FBI announced it would pay $150,000 apiece for information leading to the arrests of Alan "Monte" Pilon and Jason Wayne McVean. The men have been on the run for more than six weeks, eluding a large and expensive manhunt. "I'm always concerned about the dollars," said Police Chief Roy Lane of Cortez, Colo.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
A few dusty miles from the Navajo Nation's capital, St. Michael Indian School, founded by Blessed Katharine Drexel in 1902, is thriving if not exactly prospering. Of this spring's 26 graduates, 24 will move on to higher ed in the fall, and two recent grads were listed among the brightest freshmen at the University of Arizona. The basketball teams are playoff caliber - the girls were repeat state champs a year ago - and alums often return to prominent posts in Navajo tribal government and education.
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