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NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, Staff Writers
When the planes burned, the kids would come out. Hope Grosse and her siblings would run down their Warminster street and rubberneck amid shrieking sirens. They would watch Navy firefighters shoot a dense white foam from hoses, smothering the flames that leapt up from the fenced-off lot. When the blackened plane was cool, the children would climb the fence and jump into the burned-out cockpit, pretending to be pilots, Grosse recounted. The plane, and the field where the Navy conducted drills, was also a playground for the Kirk Road kids back in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Services will be held Monday, July 18, for Kenneth Edgar Wilson Jr., 90, of Kennett Square, a retired Navy rear admiral who died Thursday, July 7, of a lung ailment at Kendal Crosslands. After graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1947, Adm. Wilson launched a three-decade military career, serving principally in engineering roles aboard ship. The first was the cruiser USS Juneau (CL-119) in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea in the late 1940s; the second was the fast-attack submarine USS Gudgeon in the Pacific Ocean in the early 1950s.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
Every time her husband's Navy career forced the Wilson family to uproot, Dorothy "Dottie" Hargrove Wilson would decorate their new home just so. "She would have pieces of furniture that she always knew to place so that we always recognized the inside of our home wherever we went," daughter Susan Wilson Fowler said. "That was something wonderful she always did. " Ms. Wilson, formerly of Wayne, died Monday, June 20, of natural causes at the Kendal-Crosslands retirement community in Kennett Square.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Michael Boren, STAFF WRITER
The Chester County Coroner's Office has reopened the case of a 20-year-old Navy sailor from Phoenixville to determine whether a violent encounter with police at a rock concert in Camden — or drugs — killed him. Brett Katzenmoyer died five days after his 2007 arrest had left him with a concussion and broken nose. Conflicting accounts surround the incident. A security guard at a hospital where Katzenmoyer was taken said one police officer repeatedly punched Katzenmoyer, drawing blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The heyday of the starchitect pretty much ended with the last recession, but there remains one rock-star designer who still commands the attention of people who normally pay little attention to the way buildings look: Bjarke Ingels. Just 41, the Danish-born architect has already been the subject of a New Yorker profile and a Charlie Rose interview . Ingels is a regular on the TED-talk circuit, and was in Philadelphia last month to give the prestigious Louis Kahn lecture . Part of Ingels' appeal is his ability to bring irreverence and fun to architecture, similar to what Ikea did with furniture.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, Staff Writers
When the planes burned, the kids would come out. Hope Grosse and her siblings would run down their Warminster street and rubberneck amid shrieking sirens. They would watch Navy firefighters shoot a dense white foam from hoses, smothering the flames that leapt up from the fenced-off lot. When the blackened plane was cool, the children would climb the fence and jump into the burned-out cockpit, pretending to be pilots, Grosse recounted. The plane, and the field where the Navy conducted drills, was also a playground for the Kirk Road kids back in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
DURING WORLD WAR II, Edward K. Hueber, a Navy petty officer stationed in Norfolk, Va., helped teach sailors how to survive when cast adrift. He appeared to know to make water a friend. After the war, he was captain of the swim team at Yale University in the 1946-47 academic year, when it ran up a record of 13-0. In 1946 and 1947, Yale won the championship of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League, a predecessor of the Ivy League. "He was a sprinter on a four-man relay team," his wife, Josephine, said.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
During World War II, Edward K. Hueber, a Navy petty officer stationed in Norfolk, Va., helped teach sailors how to survive when cast adrift. He appeared to know to make water a friend. After the war, he was captain of the swim team at Yale University in the 1946-47 academic year, when it ran up a record of 13-0. In 1946 and 1947, Yale won the championship of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League, a predecessor of the Ivy League. "He was a sprinter on a four-man relay team," his wife, Josephine, said.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania's senators and local members of Congress are pressing the Navy to fund blood testing for residents affected by water contamination around former naval air bases in Bucks and Montgomery Counties. That request Tuesday - prompted by health concerns over chemicals that leaked into water supplies, and are linked to cancer and reproductive issues - came on the same day that the consumer advocate Erin Brockovich and a New York-based law firm announced that they would investigate the drinking-water issues in the area.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Protesters decrying a proposed Navy Yard oil import/export facility rallied outside the Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) refinery in South Philadelphia on Saturday afternoon. PES has proposed building the facility at the planned Southport Marine Terminal Complex at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. Some nearby residents and activists want the company - operator of the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia - to withdraw its proposal, one of six currently before landowner Philadelphia Regional Port Authority.
SPORTS
May 5, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
When Jelani McCargo combined the quality of education with the caliber of football, the Naval Academy looked good. When he looked beyond sports and school, the Midshipmen looked even better. "It's a great fit for me," McCargo said. "You can get set for life. " McCargo, a junior running back/linebacker at Woodrow Wilson, committed over the weekend to attend the Naval Academy. He said he would visit the school in June. "The more I thought it out, the more I liked it," McCargo said.
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