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NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
SPORTS
January 12, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jeff Battipaglia, it's sea over land. The St. Joseph's Prep lineman committed to Navy on Monday, choosing the Midshipmen over Army. Battipaglia was a first-team member of The Inquirer's all-Southeastern Pennsylvania football team. As the 6-foot-4, 265-pounder tells it, he was interested in the military colleges long before they started recruiting him. "I know it's a clich? to say it, but Sept. 11 had a profound effect on me," Battipaglia said. Battipaglia's father, Joe, worked across the street from the World Trade Center as an investment strategist and escaped harm during the terrorist attacks on Sept.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind the scenes at the Navy Yard, with its new corporate headquarters and restored 70-year-old buildings, another transformation is taking place that is largely invisible to the public, but that could have far-reaching implications. Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., the agency redeveloping the Navy Yard, is installing a "smart-grid" system on the 1,200-acre campus in South Philadelphia. PIDC envisions constructing an interconnected network of renewable power sources and storage devices in a self-supporting "community" system.
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SOME PEOPLE can tell a joke; some people can't. George Ray could start a joke just fine, but as he was nearing the punch line, the anticipation was too much for him. He would break into laughter before he got it all out. George was a funeral director with the kindness and compassion endemic to his profession, but George seemed to have an extra dose of concern when it came to helping all people along with the bereaved. "He possessed an array of dazzling antidotes for life's trials and tribulations," his family said.
REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have you ever dreamed of living seaside at the Navy Yard, the vast onetime shipbuilding hub that's emerged as a hip urban office campus? Soon, you may be able to rent homes in the shadow of mothballed naval ships. The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. is actively negotiating deed restrictions with the U.S. Navy to build housing at Philadelphia's Navy Yard for the first time. John Grady, president of the PIDC, said the agency hopes talks will lead to opening the campus to developer pitches within a year.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lux Products Corp., a privately held HVAC controls company formerly based in Mount Laurel, has relocated its headquarters to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. About 17 employees made the move, said Rob Munin, Lux president. Lux, founded in 1914 and best known for the ubiquitous spring-wound kitchen timers popular in the 1950s and 1960s, is now primarily focused on selling thermostats, which have become increasingly interconnected high-tech devices. Munin said the company neither received nor sought a tax break to move to Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERE WAS something strange about that hair tonic Charlie Zebrowski was splashing on the heads of his fellow sailors aboard the destroyer USS Coughlin. A case of it had been sent to him by a cousin when he learned that Charlie was the ship's unofficial barber, keeping the other sailors trim for inspections. There was something different about the tonic all right. It was booze! An honest mistake? Or his cousin's idea of a good joke? Whatever, Charlie soon became the most popular man on a ship that often saw action in World War II. Even officers stopped into Charlie's makeshift barbershop for a cut - and a sip. There was one thing that Charlie Zebrowski appreciated and that was a good joke.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AFTER WORKING the cold, hard streets of the city as a cop, bearing witness to the daily depredations of his fellow humans, William Dixon liked nothing better than to have the sun in his face and in his soul. To seek it out, he took numerous cruises to the Caribbean islands, and also found soothing rays closer to home at his summer house in Whitesboro, in Cape May County, N.J. His favorite time was when his family would gather there for get-togethers, and he gloried in having his loved ones around him. He was a master of the barbecue grill.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two area congressmen said Friday that the Navy's repeated delays on off-loading the former Willow Grove air base were having a ripple effect on the ability of local, state, and federal agencies to plan for the future. Reps. Patrick Meehan and Brendan Boyle said the continued delays on transferring the 850-acre base were hindering planning for school enrollment, transportation projects, and attracting real estate and business investment. "We're now 10 years into" the base's being decommissioned, said Meehan, a Republican.
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was a peaceful air and some polite conversation in the Kingsway television studio before Denzel Polk's football teammates showed up. But once those guys cut out of lunch and arrived to see their buddy sign a national letter of intent with the Naval Academy, things got loud and boisterous. "See that?" Kingsway coach Tony Barchuk said as Polk exchanged hugs and high fives with his friends. "He's a magnet. " The 6-foot-3, 218-pound Polk was recruited by Navy in large part because of athletic ability and football talent.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year ago, the board overseeing redevelopment of the former Willow Grove Naval Air Station set a goal: To break ground on the first of about 1,500 new homes in early 2015. That's not happening yet, and it probably won't until next year. "It's extremely frustrating. Extremely frustrating," said William Whiteside, chairman of the Horsham Land Redevelopment Agency and a Horsham Township councilman. "Every time we turn around, there's some new delay from the Navy. " The project, which has moved in fits and starts since 2006, is largely stalled until the Navy completes its environmental impact study, which was initially targeted for spring 2014.
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