FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
SPORTS
January 12, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jeff Battipaglia, it's sea over land. The St. Joseph's Prep lineman committed to Navy on Monday, choosing the Midshipmen over Army. Battipaglia was a first-team member of The Inquirer's all-Southeastern Pennsylvania football team. As the 6-foot-4, 265-pounder tells it, he was interested in the military colleges long before they started recruiting him. "I know it's a clich? to say it, but Sept. 11 had a profound effect on me," Battipaglia said. Battipaglia's father, Joe, worked across the street from the World Trade Center as an investment strategist and escaped harm during the terrorist attacks on Sept.
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NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James P. Holliday Jr.'s last job before retiring from the Navy in 1969 was as a special services officer at the former Philadelphia Naval Hospital. One day, Mr. Holliday took his sons on a tour of the wards sheltering the most severely wounded from combat in Vietnam. "It was quite an experience for us kids to go walking around the Naval Hospital and see all these 18-year-olds and 19-year-olds with no arms and no legs," son Scott said. "It's something we'll never forget. " Mr. Holliday, 87, a former administrator at Temple University Hospital, died of heart failure Sunday, June 22, in the rehabilitation unit of ManorCare Health Services in Washington Township, where he lived.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE POOL OF BLACK lawyers in Pennsylvania was given a needed boost in the early '70s thanks to men like Charles Mitchell. Charles and other African-American lawyers recognized that the bar examination discriminated against black candidates. They decided to take action. The result was that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to change the bar exam from essay questions to multiple choice and to stop requiring candidates to submit photographs with their applications. "After these changes, the number of black candidates rose significantly and resulted in a larger pool of black attorneys," said his son Charles L. Mitchell.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard A. Baker, 84, of West Mount Airy, a physician who served in the 1970s as the commanding officer at the Naval Regional Medical Center in Philadelphia and later taught and practiced obstetrics here, died Wednesday, June 11, of lung cancer at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Baker served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and retired in 1979 with the rank of captain. He was awarded the Navy Commendation Medal in 1973. During more than two decades of military service, Dr. Baker, a specialist in obstetrics and gynecology, was head of obstetrics at naval hospitals in the Philippines, San Diego, and Newport, R.I. He rose from director of clinical services at the Naval Center in Philadelphia in the mid-1970s to become the center's commanding officer from 1977 to 1979.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the last three years, Michael T. Baker tried to help rid Gloucester City of feral cats. "He was one of our trappers. He was such a good kitten catcher," his wife, Doran, said in a phone interview. Mr. Baker was a member of Feral Treasures, for which his wife is secretary. The local nonprofit organization promotes the reduction of wild cat populations through a policy of trapping, neutering, and releasing. On Sunday, May 18, Mr. Baker, 49, of Gloucester City, a 20-year employee of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
When his children came to him with a question - a problem at school, a fight with a friend - Rabbi Aaron Landes always responded the same way. "Let's analyze this," he'd say. It was an approach that the longtime senior rabbi at Elkins Park's Beth Sholom Congregation - and a chaplain in the Navy Reserve - applied to most challenges in his life. In 1979, during a stint at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, an official asked Rabbi Landes why more Jewish students hadn't enlisted.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE so many elements that need addressing for the 76ers to seriously start the rebuild they're currently in, with a new practice facility being at or near the top of the list. But sources have told the Daily News that some employees have been told that the plan of building at the Navy Yard has been scratched, leaving management frantically searching for a place to build a state-of-the-art facility they can call their own. Currently, the Sixers practice at the gym at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, which doesn't provide the intimacy or the updated equipment that most other teams in the league already have.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Russell J. Geiser never played an instrument, certainly not one with a Mummers string band. But at one time or another, each of his five children marched up Broad Street playing in a string band to celebrate New Year's Day. And at one time or another, his daughter Mary Raschilla said, Mr. Geiser was president of the Palmyra String Band, then of the Palmyra South Jersey String Band, and founder and president of the South Jersey String Band of...
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHAT'S A COP look like? Whatever it is, Vernon Cottman apparently fit the description. Not surprising, since he was a cop. It was true. He and his wife were in Lake Tahoe, Nev., for a police convention - but when they went into a casino, it was not where the convention was being held. Vernon was not in uniform. Nevertheless, a dealer told him he couldn't sit in a certain location because he was a cop. "We tried to figure out what a cop looks like," said his wife, Carol Kirkland Cottman.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter T. Dunston, 78, of Philadelphia, a retired dentist and U.S. Navy captain, died Sunday, March 9, at Jeanes Hospital of complications from a stroke. Born in Williamsport, Pa., he was active in sports at an early age and played organized baseball and basketball. At age 12, he was a member of the first Little League World Series championship team in 1947. "From the World of Little League Museum in South Williamsport: We are so sorry to hear about the passing of Dr. Dunston, even as we celebrate his very full life," Lance Van Auken, who is affiliated with Little League in South Williamsport, wrote in an online tribute.
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