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NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
SPORTS
January 12, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jeff Battipaglia, it's sea over land. The St. Joseph's Prep lineman committed to Navy on Monday, choosing the Midshipmen over Army. Battipaglia was a first-team member of The Inquirer's all-Southeastern Pennsylvania football team. As the 6-foot-4, 265-pounder tells it, he was interested in the military colleges long before they started recruiting him. "I know it's a clich? to say it, but Sept. 11 had a profound effect on me," Battipaglia said. Battipaglia's father, Joe, worked across the street from the World Trade Center as an investment strategist and escaped harm during the terrorist attacks on Sept.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
FORMER NAVAL HOSPITAL corpsman third-class Bill Cosby 's career has been torpedoed recently by numerous allegations of sexual abuse. Now the U.S. Navy is getting into the act. According to the Washington Post , the Navy is taking the honorary title it bestowed upon the Cos in 2011 and dropping an anchor on it. The Navy announced yesterday that Cosby will no longer be an honorary chief petty officer. "The Navy is taking this action because allegations against Mr. Cosby are very serious and are in conflict with the Navy's core values of honor, courage and commitment," it said in a press release.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "a-ha moment" for Gabriel Tatarian came at a party when, light-headed, he passed out. When he regained consciousness, son Gabriel T. said, Dr. Tatarian determined to get himself into shape. After the episode, "he was a pretty avid runner, from age 50 to 88," his son said. "He was running five miles a day for 15 years, to 65. " And that was despite a demanding day job. On Monday, Nov. 17, Dr. Tatarian, 91, of Moorestown, from 1961 to 1988 the co-chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Rancocas Valley division of the former Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital, died at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT'S SAID that some unfortunate people are born with two strikes against them. For Al C. Rinaldi, two strikes would have been great. No baseball analogy could have measured the number of strikes against Al in his childhood. He didn't even know his real name. He thought it was Freddie Nolan. He had been abandoned by his parents and raised by a female neighbor who gave him that name. He grew up in extreme poverty in Scranton. He begged for food at a local deli pretending it was for a nonexistent dog. He used sugar to mask the mold growing on the bread he took from others' garbage.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT BERGHAIER probably could have been a writer or an artist. He didn't take up either trade, but his son, Robert, said his father, a veteran of two wars, had a discerning eye. "He was very observant," his son said. "He had a very good eye and a gift for being very descriptive. He could process information and tell you exactly what happened. " What happened to Robert Berghaier might have made a good book. He and his son would sit around the kitchen table and the elder Berghaier would regale his son with stories of his adventures, down to the smallest detail.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Lo Spiedo opening Monday As you drive through the iron gates of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia, look to your left at the gatehouse. On Monday, the Vetri crew - Marc Vetri, Jeff Benjamin, Brad Spence, and Jeff Michaud - plans to open Lo Spiedo (4501 S. Broad St., 215-282-3184). "Lo spee-YAY-doh" translates to "the spit," as in rotisserie, and just about the entire menu - executed by Osteria alum Scott Calhoun - is prepared over wood-burning flame: pork ribs, pork shoulder, half-chicken, brisket, octopus.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BEING THE offspring of a high-school teacher can be a mixed blessing. There is, of course, the pride in having a father who was given the duty of enlightening the minds of other youngsters. But there was also a little uneasiness about whether everyone liked your father. "My brother, Charles, and I were often stopped by fellas who said, 'Is your pop Mr. Wilson?' " his son, Kenneth, said. "Of course, we never knew how to answer that for fear that fisticuffs could ensue.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sinkler A. Casselle Sr., 93, of Deptford, a naval architect at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from 1950 to 1977, died Sunday, Sept. 7, at Inspira Medical Center in Woodbury. Mr. Casselle was involved with "the design and development of submarines; he helped with the structural design of them," a niece, Melanie Wright, said. He won an award from the Portsmouth (N.H.) Naval Shipyard for his work on the submarine Jack in 1961, she said. He won an outstanding service award from the Navy Yard in 1966 for development of a sonar detection system for submarines, she said.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority will seek "expressions of interest" to develop the 200 acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The board agreed at its monthly meeting Tuesday to accept proposals - called "request for expressions of interest" - from terminal operators, steamship lines, automobile manufacturers, energy companies, and investment firms with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware.
SPORTS
September 17, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although there was no game on the schedule last week for the Temple Owls, little changed about their preparation. They practiced all last week as if they had a game, and on Monday they turned their attention to Saturday's opponent, Delaware State, at Lincoln Financial Field. "We spent the open week really just trying to get better and prepare for Delaware State," Temple coach Matt Rhule said. "We are focused on playing a good football team. " Temple (1-1) looks to bounce back after a 31-24 loss to Navy in its home opener on Sept.
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