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NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new drinking-water test requirement has led authorities in Warminster and Horsham to close four major wells and could further delay the redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was commonly used in firefighting foams at Willow Grove and the former Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster. Both bases have been closed for years, and PFOS has not been manufactured in the United States for about a decade. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not begin requiring local agencies to test drinking water for those compounds until this year.
NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new drinking-water test requirement has led authorities in Warminster and Horsham to close four major wells and could further delay the redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was commonly used in firefighting foams at Willow Grove and the former Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster. Both bases have been closed for years, and PFOS has not been manufactured in the United States for about a decade. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not begin requiring local agencies to test drinking water for those compounds until this year.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur T. Hilkert, 89, whose training as a Navy pharmacist's mate during World War II eventually led him to a civilian career representing U.S. drug manufacturers overseas, died Monday, July 28, at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden following a stroke. Born in Canton, Ohio, Mr. Hilkert graduated from Lehman High School there and served in the Navy from 1943 to late 1945. After boot camp, he studied in a Navy program at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., and, as a pharmacist's mate, was stationed at what is now the Naval Medical Center in San Diego.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solomon C. Pflag, 94, of Cherry Hill, a former high-ranking officer in the Navy Medical Service Corps, died Friday, Aug. 22, at his home. When he retired in 1975, Capt. Pflag was the commanding officer of the Naval Medical Materiel Support Command with headquarters in Philadelphia, daughter Sandra White said. A Navy website states that the unit, now the Naval Medical Logistics Command, had been set up in 1973 at the Naval Hospital compound in South Philadelphia. "He oversaw the procurement of all the medical-related supplies" for the Navy, his daughter said.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Westwood III, 60, a Philadelphia native who rose to the rank of captain in the Navy and served during the Gulf war and in Afghanistan, died July 28 after a long struggle with lung cancer. Mr. Westwood, who lived in Jacksonville, Fla., died during a visit to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, said his daughter Mary Lena. He was born in Philadelphia and graduated from William Penn Charter School. He then attended Rollins College in Florida and graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology.
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Brumbaugh, 88, a decorated Navy veteran and former owner of Brumbaugh Pontiac in Lansdowne, died Monday, July 21, of complications from dementia at Frey Village in Middletown, Dauphin County. Mr. Brumbaugh was the owner of Brumbaugh Pontiac until 1979, when the dealership closed due in part to falling demand for big, gas-guzzling cars. He had begun working at Brumbaugh Pontiac in 1950, and took over as president and owner of the dealership when his father, E.E. Brumbaugh, retired.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James P. Holliday Jr.'s last job before retiring from the Navy in 1969 was as a special services officer at the former Philadelphia Naval Hospital. One day, Mr. Holliday took his sons on a tour of the wards sheltering the most severely wounded from combat in Vietnam. "It was quite an experience for us kids to go walking around the Naval Hospital and see all these 18-year-olds and 19-year-olds with no arms and no legs," son Scott said. "It's something we'll never forget. " Mr. Holliday, 87, a former administrator at Temple University Hospital, died of heart failure Sunday, June 22, in the rehabilitation unit of ManorCare Health Services in Washington Township, where he lived.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE POOL OF BLACK lawyers in Pennsylvania was given a needed boost in the early '70s thanks to men like Charles Mitchell. Charles and other African-American lawyers recognized that the bar examination discriminated against black candidates. They decided to take action. The result was that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to change the bar exam from essay questions to multiple choice and to stop requiring candidates to submit photographs with their applications. "After these changes, the number of black candidates rose significantly and resulted in a larger pool of black attorneys," said his son Charles L. Mitchell.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard A. Baker, 84, of West Mount Airy, a physician who served in the 1970s as the commanding officer at the Naval Regional Medical Center in Philadelphia and later taught and practiced obstetrics here, died Wednesday, June 11, of lung cancer at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Baker served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and retired in 1979 with the rank of captain. He was awarded the Navy Commendation Medal in 1973. During more than two decades of military service, Dr. Baker, a specialist in obstetrics and gynecology, was head of obstetrics at naval hospitals in the Philippines, San Diego, and Newport, R.I. He rose from director of clinical services at the Naval Center in Philadelphia in the mid-1970s to become the center's commanding officer from 1977 to 1979.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the last three years, Michael T. Baker tried to help rid Gloucester City of feral cats. "He was one of our trappers. He was such a good kitten catcher," his wife, Doran, said in a phone interview. Mr. Baker was a member of Feral Treasures, for which his wife is secretary. The local nonprofit organization promotes the reduction of wild cat populations through a policy of trapping, neutering, and releasing. On Sunday, May 18, Mr. Baker, 49, of Gloucester City, a 20-year employee of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
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