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NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
SPORTS
January 12, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jeff Battipaglia, it's sea over land. The St. Joseph's Prep lineman committed to Navy on Monday, choosing the Midshipmen over Army. Battipaglia was a first-team member of The Inquirer's all-Southeastern Pennsylvania football team. As the 6-foot-4, 265-pounder tells it, he was interested in the military colleges long before they started recruiting him. "I know it's a clich? to say it, but Sept. 11 had a profound effect on me," Battipaglia said. Battipaglia's father, Joe, worked across the street from the World Trade Center as an investment strategist and escaped harm during the terrorist attacks on Sept.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It has been 15 years since the Philadelphia Navy Yard was turned into a suburban-style office park. Lured by the promise of free parking and easy highway access, dozens of companies now make their home there, employing some 12,000 people. The development is widely considered an economic success. If your only experience of the Navy Yard has been a fleeting glimpse from I-95, it may come as a surprise to learn that it is also a design success. Not only has the Navy Yard moved beyond the bland office-park model by creating a formal street plan with real sidewalks, but it also is producing some of the best architecture in Philadelphia - better than most of what we're seeing in Center City or University City.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU GAVE John Zurzola a choice between dining at a fancy restaurant or at home over a steaming plate of his wife's spaghetti, there was no choice. Spaghetti won every time. Which might have seemed surprising, because his wife, the former Doris Walsh, was a little Irish lady from West Philly. But she was a quick learner and her husband's family taught her how to cook Italian style. What did she put in that spaghetti gravy that made her husband prefer it to more-sophisticated fare?
BUSINESS
July 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When computer engineer Jim Nasto started working at the Philadelphia Navy Yard about a decade ago, the 1,200-acre property was a virtual desert of vacant industrial buildings and abandoned parade grounds. Many of those buildings now make up Urban Outfitters' headquarters, while the vast open spaces are being shaped into office parks inhabited by such corporations as GlaxoSmithKline. "I love it," said Nasto, 29, a research contractor for the U.S. Navy, as he tossed a bocce ball in a landscaped park that opened last month.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU'VE HEARD about jailhouse conversions. Well, here's one with a twist: In the 1940s, James Darroch was a young sailor who got into trouble when he mouthed off to a superior officer. He ended up in the brig, abashed and humiliated. What if he was court-martialed? What would this do to his family back in Philly? James did what jailhouse converts have always done. He called upon a higher power for deliverance. If he got out of that scrape, he would devote his life to serving God. He did, and he was good with his word.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liberty Property Trust is set to break ground Tuesday on a 94,000-square-foot office building at the Navy Yard designed by the architect behind Two World Trade Center, a plan that is among the developer's boldest bets yet on the sprawling business center. The building at 1200 Intrepid Ave., fronting a five-acre park by the designer of the High Line in New York, would contain the most office space that Liberty has started at the South Philadelphia complex without a tenant in place.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the world's leading managers of electricity networks on Tuesday agreed to open a research center in partnership with Pennsylvania State University at the Navy Yard, reinforcing its emergence as a smart-energy campus. Alstom Grid, a unit of French industrial giant Alstom, will open the Microgrid Center of Excellence at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The center will be involved in the deployment of new technologies related to "microgrids," which are localized electrical systems that can operate autonomously from the regional power grid.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investment manager Franklin Square Capital Partners has applied for a $7.5 million grant to build a hotel at Philadelphia's Navy Yard business campus, according to a state report. The property, described as a "luxury boutique hotel," would feature 150 guest rooms, according to the list of applicants to the Redevelopment Capital Assistance Program posted Wednesday on the state's website. No other details, including the prospective hotel's operator and total budget, were disclosed.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind the scenes at the Navy Yard, with its new corporate headquarters and restored 70-year-old buildings, another transformation is taking place that is largely invisible to the public, but that could have far-reaching implications. Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., the agency redeveloping the Navy Yard, is installing a "smart-grid" system on the 1,200-acre campus in South Philadelphia. PIDC envisions constructing an interconnected network of renewable power sources and storage devices in a self-supporting "community" system.
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SOME PEOPLE can tell a joke; some people can't. George Ray could start a joke just fine, but as he was nearing the punch line, the anticipation was too much for him. He would break into laughter before he got it all out. George was a funeral director with the kindness and compassion endemic to his profession, but George seemed to have an extra dose of concern when it came to helping all people along with the bereaved. "He possessed an array of dazzling antidotes for life's trials and tribulations," his family said.
REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have you ever dreamed of living seaside at the Navy Yard, the vast onetime shipbuilding hub that's emerged as a hip urban office campus? Soon, you may be able to rent homes in the shadow of mothballed naval ships. The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. is actively negotiating deed restrictions with the U.S. Navy to build housing at Philadelphia's Navy Yard for the first time. John Grady, president of the PIDC, said the agency hopes talks will lead to opening the campus to developer pitches within a year.
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