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NEWS
June 3, 1986
The May 23 Op-ed article by Maxwell Glen and Cody Shearer, "The Navy goes into show biz," seems to be saying four things: first, that it is wrong for the Navy to profit from the film industry; second, that it is wrong for the film industry to profit from the Navy; third, the Navy should not use privately funded movies for recruiting purposes; fourth, the Navy should not be spending so many taxpayers dollars on recruiting. Consider each in turn. First, it would be wrong for the Navy to refuse private funding to offset the cost of pilot proficiency training (and that is what the hours flown during the filming of Top Gun represent, since they would have been flown even without the presence of a film crew)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Citing unexpected circumstances, a Montgomery County judge yesterday revoked an earlier ruling ordering a Lansdale man to serve a four-year stint in the Navy. Common Pleas Court Judge S. Gerald Corso sentenced Nathan I. Rubinkam, 20, to five years' probation and 150 hours of community service. The ruling overrides an Aug. 24 order to send Rubinkam into the Navy and have him serve five years of nonreporting probation for his part in a series of thefts from autos in the North Penn area in 1988 and 1989.
SPORTS
March 26, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The University of Pennsylvania dominated the U.S. Naval Academy in three out of four races in a women's rowing regatta yesterday on a windswept Schuylkill. Penn outrowed the Middies by almost 1 1/2 lengths in the varsity race, covering the 2,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 44.6 seconds. Navy's time was 6:50.0. The Quakers also won the second varsity and the first novice varsity races, while Navy prevailed in the second novice varsity race.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Jason Dearen, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - In 2005, the USS America aircraft carrier was towed out to sea on its final voyage. Hundreds of miles off the Atlantic coast, U.S. Navy personnel then blasted the 40-year-old warship with missiles and bombs until it sank. The Kitty Hawk-class carrier - more than three football fields long - came to rest in the briny depths about 300 nautical miles southeast of Norfolk, Va. Target practice is now the way the Navy gets rid of most of its old ships, an Associated Press review of Navy records for the last dozen years has found.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy is fighting to keep the USS Olympia, Adm. George Dewey's flagship in the Spanish American War battle of Manila, from being taken over by a man who successfully sued the ship's owners after his son fell overboard and drowned. The Olympia, moored at Penn's Landing, was about to be padlocked by U.S. marshals Friday so that its contents could be attached to the estate of Robert Matthews, a 20-year-old deckhand who drowned in 1983. They were prevented from finishing the job when U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz gave the U.S. attorney's office, representing the Navy, time to prepare legal papers for presentation today.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh off their most meaningful victory in recent seasons, the Drexel Dragons didn't allow Navy to catch them still savoring it last night. The Dragons (14-5) put the Midshipmen away early on their way to a 73-57 nonleague victory at Halsey Fieldhouse. It was Drexel's seventh straight victory. And it marked the first time the Dragons had put together that many wins since the 1985-86 season, when Drexel went to the NCAA tournament. Playing a Navy team (7-12) that had not distinguished itself this season, Drexel was a prime candidate for a letdown.
SPORTS
December 8, 2006 | By Jonathan Tannenwald FOR THE INQUIRER
The Penn basketball team faced a unique challenge last night against Navy. The Midshipmen's high-powered offense came into the contest averaging nearly 25 three-point attempts per game and a 40 percent shooting average from beyond the arc. Off the floor, a raucous crowd of 2,185 at Alumni Hall was inspired by a national television broadcast and ceremonies marking Pearl Harbor Day. But the Quakers managed to take care of both those problems with...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By EDWIN M. YODER JR
The report on the April gun-turret explosion on the USS Iowa may satisfy the immediate administrative needs of the Navy. But as an exercise in historical inquiry, or common justice, it stinks. After a disaster that cost 47 lives, the Navy seems to have reposed its faith in scientific and pseudo-scientific investigative methods, chemical and psychological - as if an extravagant investment in state-of-the-art forensics would dispel all doubts. It plainly didn't. Even after investing four months and $4 million in the inquiry, the Navy still doesn't really know how the explosion occurred, or who was to blame.
SPORTS
December 1, 2009
A limited number of standing-room tickets are on sale for the Army/Navy game, set for Dec. 12 at Lincoln Financial Field. The tickets cost $45 each and can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at all Ticketmaster outlets. Premium packages, going for $275 and $350 per person, are also available. The packages include various perks, such as lower-level seating, a parking pass and access to the pregame VIP Tailgate at Citizens Bank Park. To purchase either premium package, fans should call 1-888-332-CLUB.
SPORTS
January 12, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Jeff Battipaglia, it's sea over land. The St. Joseph's Prep lineman committed to Navy on Monday, choosing the Midshipmen over Army. Battipaglia was a first-team member of The Inquirer's all-Southeastern Pennsylvania football team. As the 6-foot-4, 265-pounder tells it, he was interested in the military colleges long before they started recruiting him. "I know it's a clich? to say it, but Sept. 11 had a profound effect on me," Battipaglia said. Battipaglia's father, Joe, worked across the street from the World Trade Center as an investment strategist and escaped harm during the terrorist attacks on Sept.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Future generations of young Philadelphians may no longer have I. Goldberg Army & Navy on Chestnut Street for the military jackets, chunky boots, and other fashion choices their parents wish they wouldn't make. Unable to afford a rent increase at its current 1300 Chestnut St. home, the iconic Philadelphia military surplus, work clothes, and outerwear emporium is seeking a new location - nearby, it hopes - for when its lease expires late next year. The 97-year-old business is finding itself on the losing end of Center City's brightening real estate fortunes, as rising demand for retail space enables landlords to seek ever-higher rents.
NEWS
January 2, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Ludwig Clifford Lewis Jr., 91, of Mantoloking, N.J., a former Malvern Borough Council president, a Navy veteran, and a retired doctor, died Wednesday, Dec. 23, at Jersey Shore Medical Center of complications from a stroke. Dr. Lewis, known as "Cliff," had a general practice in Malvern for 46 years. He also served on the council for six years and was its president for one term. Dr. Lewis was born on Jan. 17, 1924, in Villanova to Ludwig Clifford and Lucy S. Jefferys Lewis. He graduated from Episcopal Academy in 1941, when the campus was in Merion.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Its scientists have developed "anti-torpedos" - seafaring interceptors akin to Patriot missiles. They're designing new navigation systems to allow sailors and soldiers to know where they are when GPS isn't available. They're working on a new fuel made from aluminum powder and seawater that would let unmanned vehicles stay in the depths longer as they hunt down enemy mines. Without fanfare, this work - much of it top secret - goes on in a nondescript building on Pennsylvania State University's main campus, the Applied Research Laboratory, which conducts more than $200 million in research each year, the bulk of that for the Navy.
SPORTS
December 14, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the people who ran the Heisman Trophy ceremony were too busy with preparations to watch Saturday's Army-Navy game on television and observe yet another great performance from the player they neglected to include among the finalists. Navy senior Keenan Reynolds put the wraps on an unblemished record in the annual service academy rivalry. He rushed for 136 yards and two touchdowns and threw for a score in a record-setting performance that carried the Midshipmen to a 21-17 victory over Army on a springlike day before a crowd of 69,722 at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Annelyssa Reynolds cares deeply about being at the annual Army-Navy Game to cheer for Navy - deeply enough to schedule her wedding around it. Reynolds, of Mount Laurel, and her beloved, David Snyder of York, Pa., exchanged vows at St. Augustine Church in Philadelphia on Friday. Less than 24 hours later, weary but exhilarated, they joined a dozen family members and friends for a pregame, blue-and-gold tailgate party in a parking lot near Lincoln Financial Field. Reynolds, 28, has been going to the Army-Navy Game to cheer for Navy since she was 10, the first time accompanying a friend whose father graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy.
SPORTS
December 14, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo felt he needed to be honest with his players about his interest in the head coaching job at Brigham Young, even if it could have been a distraction in preparations for the Midshipmen's huge rivalry game against Army. The decision by Niumatalolo, who will be interviewed Monday by BYU officials, was criticized by athletic director Chet Gladchuk and others connected with Navy. But the players, regardless of their feelings, made sure it wasn't a hindrance Saturday in their 21-17 victory over the Black Knights at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Retired Army Lt. Col. Richard Peck is no stranger to adversity, having served 12 years on active duty and 16 more in the reserves. But ahead of kickoff at the Army-Navy Game at Lincoln Financial Field on Saturday, Peck said West Point football's 13-game losing streak - now 14 - was testing even his limits. "We've got to put a stop to this nonsense. I didn't drive 285 miles to watch them lose!" said Peck, 67, an American Legionnaire from Pascoag, R.I., who sported an elaborately waxed mustache and a "Beat Navy" hat embellished with the word Please!
SPORTS
December 12, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Navy's Calvin Cass Jr. calls the service academy link to his father "an interesting dynamic in the family," and that could be considered an understatement. Cass, a junior slotback and return man for the Midshipmen from Sicklerville in Camden County, is the son of Calvin Cass Sr., a three-year starter at running back who played at Army from 1987 through 1990. When he saw his son play in his first Army-Navy game last year in Baltimore, the elder Cass wore neutral colors. Now with the 116th Army-Navy game coming up Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field, there is some friendly banter going on, and some meaningful conversation as well.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU entered Solomon West's home in Mount Airy, you were greeted by a portrait of a man in a Naval uniform. The subject was Solomon West. And the artist was Solomon West. Solomon was a man of many talents, a hardworking guy driven by a work ethic that wouldn't quit. Art, especially portrait-painting, was how he relaxed from his career as an electrician, at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Amtrak. Wherever he went, from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz, on which he served in the Navy, to his civilian jobs, Solomon was frequently honored for his dedication to his duties and reluctance ever to take a day off. Solomon West, whose many interests also included gardening, cooking, winemaking and fishing, all roles that he threw himself into with a passionate dedication to detail, died Friday after a short illness.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Things looked grim for the Navy goat. Nauseated and laboring to breathe, he was rushed by his handlers from Annapolis, Md., to the New Bolton Center of the University of Pennsylvania, the nearest 24-hour large-animal hospital. Blood tests showed abnormalities in his electrolytes and a high level of acidity. It appeared that Bill - Bill 36, to be exact - might have eaten an azalea bush, toxic to goats. Holly Roessner, an intern on duty in the emergency room that November night, inserted a tube down Bill's throat and into his rumen, the largest of his four stomachs.
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