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Navy Yard

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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nina Johnsen, wife of Aker Philadelphia Shipyard CEO Kristian Rokke, cracked a champagne bottle over a bow to christen Aker's 18th tanker last week, many of the yard's 1,100 employees cheered. The shipyard, after several lean years, is building two tankers for Exxon Mobil Corp. Times are flush again. Aker is emblematic of how far the Navy Yard has come in a decade: from shriveled military base to 130 businesses and 10,000 employees. The latest arrival, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., will move 1,300 workers, starting Monday into a gleaming all-glass office building near the Navy Yard's front gate.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
In an election year, everything's political. And nothing's more political than the fate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. In June 1991, a base closure commission voted to begin shutting down the yard in 1996. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., and Reps. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., Curt Weldon, R-Pa., and Rob Andrews, D-N.J., filed a lawsuit against the Navy and the commission soon after. Since then, a U.S. District Court judge threw out the case and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to the district court.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
The next 90 days, says U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon, will be "intense. " Weldon led a bipartisan delegation of five local congressmen to Russia last week. They returned with an agreement to explore what could be a great deal for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. If the idea proves environmentally and economically sound, as many as 150 old Soviet warships would be dismantled at the shipyard over the next several years. The plan is to buy the warships for cash - giving the Russians hard currency they desperately need.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
The 195-year-old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was officially closed yesterday, a sobering reminder that the city's reign as a powerhouse of heavy industry is probably over forever. In a somber ceremony under gray skies outside the shipyard's historic Building 4, the American flag was lowered and the log, the daily diary of the yard's activities since 1801, was signed for the final time by the facility's 21st and last commander, Capt. John C. Bergner. About 2,500 people, some of them retired yard workers with tears in their eyes, listened as Bergner and other dignitaries reprised the glorious history of the yard, long the city's largest industrial employer.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY THOMAS M. FOGLIETTA
For the past 194 years, the city of Philadelphia and the Navy have had a contract. Under this contract, the workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard dedicated themselves to safeguarding American security by maintaining the best fleet in the world. In return, the Navy provided good jobs at good wages to generations of workers and their families. While this contract will formally end when the USS John F. Kennedy departs the Navy Yard in September, it does not relieve the Navy of certain responsibilities.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A House Armed Services subcommittee agreed yesterday to spend $10 million in fiscal 1989 to overhaul the firefighting system at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Pa.) said. The money would go toward the second phase of the project to repair and upgrade nearly 18,000 feet of water mains at the Navy Yard. The authorization yesterday, which must be approved by the full committee next week, would complete spending on what last year was estimated at $14 million in necessary water-system reconstruction.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware legislators huddled on Capitol Hill yesterday to begin mapping strategy for the battle to keep the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Naval Base open. The brief meeting ended with the lawmakers, four of the six U.S. senators from the tri-state region and a half-dozen House members, insisting the installation could be spared on merit, while boasting they also had the political muscle to prevail. "The chances are much better than ever of saving the Navy Yard," said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
Imagine suburbanites coming into Philadelphia to beat the wage tax. Bizzaroland? No, Fumoland. State Sen. Vincent Fumo, D-Phila., and City Councilman James Kenney are researching a plan to convert the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into an enterprise zone where workers would pay a lower wage tax than either city dwellers or commuters now pay. "I've always said the two biggest problems in Philadelphia are a lack of leadership and the wage...
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hoboken Shipyards of Hoboken, N.J., has asked the General Accounting Office to review a contract awarded to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the overhaul of the Clifton Sprague, a Navy reserve frigate. On Friday, the North Jersey shipyard requested that the GAO determine whether the $4.45 million contract won by the Philadelphia yard included the same costs that the Hoboken yard was required by the Navy to include in its $5.4 million bid. Among them were the cost of lodging and feeding the 220 seamen now on the vessel and the amount of overhead allocated by the Navy to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lux Products Corp., a privately held HVAC controls company formerly based in Mount Laurel, has relocated its headquarters to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. About 17 employees made the move, said Rob Munin, Lux president. Lux, founded in 1914 and best known for the ubiquitous spring-wound kitchen timers popular in the 1950s and 1960s, is now primarily focused on selling thermostats, which have become increasingly interconnected high-tech devices. Munin said the company neither received nor sought a tax break to move to Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Navy Yard energy-storage firm expects to step up to a bigger stage after its acquisition by renewable-power project developer SunEdison Inc. Solar Grid Storage L.L.C., a start-up formed in 2011 and funded partly with $250,000 in venture capital from the Ben Franklin Technology Partnership, on Thursday announced its sale to SunEdison for an undisclosed sum. Solar Grid has four energy-storage projects, including one that is part of Pennsylvania State...
FOOD
February 27, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Chestnut Street Philly Bagels  (1705 Chestnut St., 215-299-9920), in the former Tokyo Lunch Box across from the new Forever 21 store, is a brand-new offshoot of the popular South Street Philly Bagels, on Third Street south of South Street. Aaron Wagner, whose family of New York émigrés also owns the Bagel Spot in Cherry Hill, has brought in Jonathan Yamini as his business partner. For her restaurant-ownership debut, Sarah Levine has realized a longtime dream by setting up the quaint Luna Cafe (317 Market St., 215-309-3140)
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
  With 600 stocky, blue-and-white bicycles, designed to be easy to use and hard to steal, Philadelphia will launch an ambitious bike-sharing system in spring in at least 60 locations, from Temple University to the Navy Yard and from the Delaware River to University City. The program, dubbed Indego because of an $8.5 million contribution from Independence Blue Cross, will allow riders to use credit cards, cash, or member cards to rent bikes 24 hours a day. "You can take a short trip from Point A to Point B or back to Point A, if that's what you want to do," Mayor Nutter said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of seven unions that build ships at Aker Philadelphia Shipyard have approved a contract providing a 10 percent raise over four years. The contract took effect Feb. 1 and expires Jan. 31, 2019. About 350 laborers, ironworkers, painters, boilermakers, plumbers, operating engineers, and electricians voted Tuesday, said Louis Agre, president of the Philadelphia Metal Trades Council. The vote tally was not disclosed. Mike Giantomaso, Aker Shipyard vice president of human resources, said, "We are pleased to have successfully ratified this agreement and very proud to continue our partnership.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline said Wednesday that it would cut hundreds of jobs in the United States, with the Philadelphia region gaining and losing positions, as it begins a three-year process of eliminating $1.57 billion in annual expenses. London-based GSK will significantly reduce its research and development operation in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park, moving some of those positions and people to facilities in Upper Merion and Upper Providence, Montgomery County. However, some Philadelphia-area employees in commercial divisions will be laid off, with departures starting early in 2015.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Selling medicine - versus, say, televisions or toasters - for profit has inherent conflicts, and those challenges played out in several places Tuesday with drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline. In the morning at the Navy Yard, company officials handed out $40,000 to each of nine Philadelphia-area nonprofit organizations. In the afternoon, President Obama visited the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., where scientists are working on the first Ebola vaccine to be tested on humans, an effort involving tax dollars and hundreds of GSK employees in this region.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Maybe it's not really La Peg's fault. It's still getting its sea legs - perhaps "river legs" would be a better descriptor - at the foot of the Ben Franklin Bridge, just across the hiss of Columbus Boulevard from the Race Street Pier. But my first experience in the soaring space in the reimagined 1903-vintage redbrick FringeArts Building - months before the La Peg move-in, and the rise of its menu of what chef-owner Peter Woolsey calls "French-ish" brasserie fare, and its beer garden strung with lights - was so uproarious that, well, La Peg seemed in my recent visits like a wallflower at its own party.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Lo Spiedo opening Monday As you drive through the iron gates of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia, look to your left at the gatehouse. On Monday, the Vetri crew - Marc Vetri, Jeff Benjamin, Brad Spence, and Jeff Michaud - plans to open Lo Spiedo (4501 S. Broad St., 215-282-3184). "Lo spee-YAY-doh" translates to "the spit," as in rotisserie, and just about the entire menu - executed by Osteria alum Scott Calhoun - is prepared over wood-burning flame: pork ribs, pork shoulder, half-chicken, brisket, octopus.
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