CollectionsNavy Yard
IN THE NEWS

Navy Yard

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nina Johnsen, wife of Aker Philadelphia Shipyard CEO Kristian Rokke, cracked a champagne bottle over a bow to christen Aker's 18th tanker last week, many of the yard's 1,100 employees cheered. The shipyard, after several lean years, is building two tankers for Exxon Mobil Corp. Times are flush again. Aker is emblematic of how far the Navy Yard has come in a decade: from shriveled military base to 130 businesses and 10,000 employees. The latest arrival, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., will move 1,300 workers, starting Monday into a gleaming all-glass office building near the Navy Yard's front gate.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
In an election year, everything's political. And nothing's more political than the fate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. In June 1991, a base closure commission voted to begin shutting down the yard in 1996. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., and Reps. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., Curt Weldon, R-Pa., and Rob Andrews, D-N.J., filed a lawsuit against the Navy and the commission soon after. Since then, a U.S. District Court judge threw out the case and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to the district court.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
The next 90 days, says U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon, will be "intense. " Weldon led a bipartisan delegation of five local congressmen to Russia last week. They returned with an agreement to explore what could be a great deal for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. If the idea proves environmentally and economically sound, as many as 150 old Soviet warships would be dismantled at the shipyard over the next several years. The plan is to buy the warships for cash - giving the Russians hard currency they desperately need.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
The 195-year-old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was officially closed yesterday, a sobering reminder that the city's reign as a powerhouse of heavy industry is probably over forever. In a somber ceremony under gray skies outside the shipyard's historic Building 4, the American flag was lowered and the log, the daily diary of the yard's activities since 1801, was signed for the final time by the facility's 21st and last commander, Capt. John C. Bergner. About 2,500 people, some of them retired yard workers with tears in their eyes, listened as Bergner and other dignitaries reprised the glorious history of the yard, long the city's largest industrial employer.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY THOMAS M. FOGLIETTA
For the past 194 years, the city of Philadelphia and the Navy have had a contract. Under this contract, the workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard dedicated themselves to safeguarding American security by maintaining the best fleet in the world. In return, the Navy provided good jobs at good wages to generations of workers and their families. While this contract will formally end when the USS John F. Kennedy departs the Navy Yard in September, it does not relieve the Navy of certain responsibilities.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A House Armed Services subcommittee agreed yesterday to spend $10 million in fiscal 1989 to overhaul the firefighting system at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Pa.) said. The money would go toward the second phase of the project to repair and upgrade nearly 18,000 feet of water mains at the Navy Yard. The authorization yesterday, which must be approved by the full committee next week, would complete spending on what last year was estimated at $14 million in necessary water-system reconstruction.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware legislators huddled on Capitol Hill yesterday to begin mapping strategy for the battle to keep the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Naval Base open. The brief meeting ended with the lawmakers, four of the six U.S. senators from the tri-state region and a half-dozen House members, insisting the installation could be spared on merit, while boasting they also had the political muscle to prevail. "The chances are much better than ever of saving the Navy Yard," said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
Imagine suburbanites coming into Philadelphia to beat the wage tax. Bizzaroland? No, Fumoland. State Sen. Vincent Fumo, D-Phila., and City Councilman James Kenney are researching a plan to convert the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into an enterprise zone where workers would pay a lower wage tax than either city dwellers or commuters now pay. "I've always said the two biggest problems in Philadelphia are a lack of leadership and the wage...
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hoboken Shipyards of Hoboken, N.J., has asked the General Accounting Office to review a contract awarded to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the overhaul of the Clifton Sprague, a Navy reserve frigate. On Friday, the North Jersey shipyard requested that the GAO determine whether the $4.45 million contract won by the Philadelphia yard included the same costs that the Hoboken yard was required by the Navy to include in its $5.4 million bid. Among them were the cost of lodging and feeding the 220 seamen now on the vessel and the amount of overhead allocated by the Navy to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE so many elements that need addressing for the 76ers to seriously start the rebuild they're currently in, with a new practice facility being at or near the top of the list. But sources have told the Daily News that some employees have been told that the plan of building at the Navy Yard has been scratched, leaving management frantically searching for a place to build a state-of-the-art facility they can call their own. Currently, the Sixers practice at the gym at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, which doesn't provide the intimacy or the updated equipment that most other teams in the league already have.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia, teetering on the edge of the world stage, wants a leading role. Enter the Global Philadelphia Association. GPA, in conjunction with Mayor Nutter's administration, is pressing the city's case that it should be added to the list of World Heritage Cities, a designation seen as a further boost to Philadelphia as an attraction for international tourists. The city's efforts secured a visit last week from Denis Ricard, secretary general of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC)
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was like living aboard a floating city. There was recreation. Allen Polixa, a crew member on the USS Forrestal from 1980 to 1982, often took "swim breaks" miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, jumping into the water from just below the ship's top deck. There was order. Fight a colleague or steal from another crew member, said Jimmie Stewart, who served on the Forrestal from 1960 to 1962, and it was down to the brig. No questions asked. And there was chaos. In July 1967, a devastating fire and a series of chain-reaction explosions took the lives of 134 sailors aboard the Forrestal.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Weather permitting, the USS Forrestal will leave the Navy Yard on Tuesday on its last voyage - to a scrap facility in Texas. The Navy has paid one cent under a contract to have the 60-year-old vessel dismantled by All Star Metals in the Gulf port of Brownsville. The Forrestal, the first of the post-World War II supercarriers, already has been stripped to the steel and will make its way to Texas under tow instead of its own power. The Navy said All Star Metals had contracted with Foss Marine Towing for the job. No time has been announced yet for the ship's departure from the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WHEN A relentless winter storm buried the city under 14 inches of snow Tuesday, plenty of people knew they were in for a long, miserable night. Canceled flights. Delayed trains. Car rides that were destined to end soon after they started on the side of some whited-out road. But there was a silver lining amid all of the white stuff if you happened to be in a certain stretch of South Philly: the Marriott's brand-new hotel in the Navy Yard was open, and eager to take on guests. The Courtyard Philadelphia South at the Navy Yard, which opened for the first time earlier this month, sold out all of its 172 rooms on the night of the storm, said Jennifer Tran, manager of the Navy Yard's marketing and communications for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once Marcelo J. Rouco decided on Philadelphia as the location for the North American headquarters of his Australian energy-efficiency firm, Ecosave Inc., he went all in. Last June, he paid $4.2 million for a small engineering firm in Bristol, DVL Automation, as a beachhead for his North American expansion. He also bought a Center City house and relocated his wife and two children from Down Under. "Australia is a great place, but a smaller market, only 21 million people," said Rouco, 44. "So I expect the North American office to generate a lot more revenue than the Australian office.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of Horsham residents turned out Monday to comment on the Navy's environmental impact study for redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station at Willow Grove. Most residents were concerned with traffic, noise, and other impacts during and after construction. Activists also submitted comments and distributed leaflets opposing the drone command center at the Horsham Air Guard Base, which is adjacent but unrelated to the naval base redevelopment. Troops at the Air Guard base are training to remotely operate MQ-9 Reaper drones to conduct strikes and surveillance overseas as part of the U.S. counterterrorism program.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Any tradition that has lasted 114 years must evolve to survive. And so, the annual Mummers Parade has been put through Darwinian paces. Routes have been tweaked. Hours curtailed. Rules imposed. Crowds have expanded and contracted. Drag queens, who strutted until the 1970s, returned to the frilled fold in 2013 - and oh, dem golden kinky boots. But the 2014 rendition, which rolled and strutted, boogied and high-stepped, clowned and twirled up South Broad Street on Wednesday in a well-hydrated flurry of confetti, sequins, feathers, and face paint, was 100 percent consistent with its century-old roots in the most essential Philadelphia ways.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WHAT DO YOU get for the corporate hot spot that seems like it has everything? How 'bout some underground transit? U.S. Sen. Bob Casey called yesterday for extending SEPTA's Broad Street subway line into the Navy Yard, given the area's dramatic rebirth as a sprawling office park that's home to about 10,000 workers. Casey sent a letter to Brigid Hynes-Cherin, the Federal Transportation Agency's (FTA) regional administrator, urging her to discuss the potential project with SEPTA, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC)
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters, the iconic purveyor of hip clothing and housewares, doubled down on the city and state Monday, announcing that it was expanding its Philadelphia headquarters and adding a distribution center in Lancaster County. The expansion will ultimately mean an additional 2,000 jobs in the city and 500 in Gap, according to Richard Hayne, Urban Outfitters' founder and chief executive officer, who spoke at a news conference at the Marriott Hotel in Center City. The firm said it was investing $210 million in the projects, which include refurbishing a 250,000-square-foot structure at the Navy Yard and constructing a 1.2 million-square-foot distribution center in Salisbury Township, Lancaster County.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|