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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nina Johnsen, wife of Aker Philadelphia Shipyard CEO Kristian Rokke, cracked a champagne bottle over a bow to christen Aker's 18th tanker last week, many of the yard's 1,100 employees cheered. The shipyard, after several lean years, is building two tankers for Exxon Mobil Corp. Times are flush again. Aker is emblematic of how far the Navy Yard has come in a decade: from shriveled military base to 130 businesses and 10,000 employees. The latest arrival, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., will move 1,300 workers, starting Monday into a gleaming all-glass office building near the Navy Yard's front gate.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
In an election year, everything's political. And nothing's more political than the fate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. In June 1991, a base closure commission voted to begin shutting down the yard in 1996. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., and Reps. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., Curt Weldon, R-Pa., and Rob Andrews, D-N.J., filed a lawsuit against the Navy and the commission soon after. Since then, a U.S. District Court judge threw out the case and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to the district court.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
The next 90 days, says U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon, will be "intense. " Weldon led a bipartisan delegation of five local congressmen to Russia last week. They returned with an agreement to explore what could be a great deal for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. If the idea proves environmentally and economically sound, as many as 150 old Soviet warships would be dismantled at the shipyard over the next several years. The plan is to buy the warships for cash - giving the Russians hard currency they desperately need.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
The 195-year-old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was officially closed yesterday, a sobering reminder that the city's reign as a powerhouse of heavy industry is probably over forever. In a somber ceremony under gray skies outside the shipyard's historic Building 4, the American flag was lowered and the log, the daily diary of the yard's activities since 1801, was signed for the final time by the facility's 21st and last commander, Capt. John C. Bergner. About 2,500 people, some of them retired yard workers with tears in their eyes, listened as Bergner and other dignitaries reprised the glorious history of the yard, long the city's largest industrial employer.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY THOMAS M. FOGLIETTA
For the past 194 years, the city of Philadelphia and the Navy have had a contract. Under this contract, the workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard dedicated themselves to safeguarding American security by maintaining the best fleet in the world. In return, the Navy provided good jobs at good wages to generations of workers and their families. While this contract will formally end when the USS John F. Kennedy departs the Navy Yard in September, it does not relieve the Navy of certain responsibilities.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A House Armed Services subcommittee agreed yesterday to spend $10 million in fiscal 1989 to overhaul the firefighting system at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Pa.) said. The money would go toward the second phase of the project to repair and upgrade nearly 18,000 feet of water mains at the Navy Yard. The authorization yesterday, which must be approved by the full committee next week, would complete spending on what last year was estimated at $14 million in necessary water-system reconstruction.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware legislators huddled on Capitol Hill yesterday to begin mapping strategy for the battle to keep the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Naval Base open. The brief meeting ended with the lawmakers, four of the six U.S. senators from the tri-state region and a half-dozen House members, insisting the installation could be spared on merit, while boasting they also had the political muscle to prevail. "The chances are much better than ever of saving the Navy Yard," said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
Imagine suburbanites coming into Philadelphia to beat the wage tax. Bizzaroland? No, Fumoland. State Sen. Vincent Fumo, D-Phila., and City Councilman James Kenney are researching a plan to convert the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into an enterprise zone where workers would pay a lower wage tax than either city dwellers or commuters now pay. "I've always said the two biggest problems in Philadelphia are a lack of leadership and the wage...
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hoboken Shipyards of Hoboken, N.J., has asked the General Accounting Office to review a contract awarded to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the overhaul of the Clifton Sprague, a Navy reserve frigate. On Friday, the North Jersey shipyard requested that the GAO determine whether the $4.45 million contract won by the Philadelphia yard included the same costs that the Hoboken yard was required by the Navy to include in its $5.4 million bid. Among them were the cost of lodging and feeding the 220 seamen now on the vessel and the amount of overhead allocated by the Navy to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
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FOOD
June 27, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
As Cristina Martinez heated a wide maguey leaf on the food cart's griddle, her husband, Benjamin Miller, reached into a warming box holding slow-cooked barbacoa lamb, and the earthy aromas of Capulhuac, Mexico, suddenly wafted over this South Philly corner at Eighth and Watkins Streets. "You want rib meat, leg, or spine?" asks Miller, assembling a one-pound package of moist flesh to be gift-wrapped inside the maguey leaf, with a pint of lamb consomme, spicy cactus salad, and a stack of fresh tortillas on the side.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
PHILADELPHIA cyclists, rejoice! City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee approved a bill yesterday that would pave the way for a bike sharing program in Philadelphia The bill, introduced by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, now moves to Council for a full vote. "Bike sharing will bring Philadelphia to the next level of bike friendliness, sustainability and put us on par with tourism and hospitality destination cities across the world," said Reynolds Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014 | BY TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
    BEFORE the Philadelphia Orchestra departs on a three-week visit to Asia with Yannick Nezet-Seguin, making his first tour with the musicians, they're offering six free programs throughout the region. Designed to reach audiences in different venues, and in collaborative participation with other organizations, the week could be seen as a present to the public after Yannick's second season here. To make that gift, the 95-member ensemble will split into smaller groups, the better to reach more neighborhoods.
SPORTS
May 6, 2014 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
AS MOURAD Marofit was approaching the finish line of the 35th annual Independence Blue Cross Broad Street Run, he looked over his shoulder to realize he could stroll comfortably to victory with more than 41,000 runners behind him. Once finishing the 10-mile race at the Navy Yard, the 32-year-old Moroccan native, a first-time participant, crashed to the ground with a cramp and exhaustion but was unable to hide the large, satisfied smile on his...
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
SPORTS
May 5, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Chesterton said he hasn't raced a ton competitively since graduating from Haverford College in 2011, but he'll be at the start line with thousands of others Sunday at the Broad Street Run. He's a rookie in this race. "I talked to a bunch of people who are running Broad Street," Chesterton said Friday. "The one thing they talk about is how great the crowds are. People who are running for fun, having crowds and that kind of support certainly helps. A lot of people have never run 10 miles in their life.
SPORTS
May 2, 2014 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer
MARKING THE 35th year of Philadelphia's largest race, the Blue Cross Broad Street Run will offer a chance for some 40,000 runners to cross the finish line on Sunday. The 10-mile race begins at Broad Street and West Fisher Avenue at 8:30 a.m. and will take runners past such landmarks as Temple University, City Hall, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Avenue of the Arts and the Philadelphia stadium complex before ending in the Navy Yard. The run will feature increased security for the second consecutive year due to the Boston Marathon bombings last April.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE so many elements that need addressing for the 76ers to seriously start the rebuild they're currently in, with a new practice facility being at or near the top of the list. But sources have told the Daily News that some employees have been told that the plan of building at the Navy Yard has been scratched, leaving management frantically searching for a place to build a state-of-the-art facility they can call their own. Currently, the Sixers practice at the gym at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, which doesn't provide the intimacy or the updated equipment that most other teams in the league already have.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia, teetering on the edge of the world stage, wants a leading role. Enter the Global Philadelphia Association. GPA, in conjunction with Mayor Nutter's administration, is pressing the city's case that it should be added to the list of World Heritage Cities, a designation seen as a further boost to Philadelphia as an attraction for international tourists. The city's efforts secured a visit last week from Denis Ricard, secretary general of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC)
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