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Navy Yard

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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nina Johnsen, wife of Aker Philadelphia Shipyard CEO Kristian Rokke, cracked a champagne bottle over a bow to christen Aker's 18th tanker last week, many of the yard's 1,100 employees cheered. The shipyard, after several lean years, is building two tankers for Exxon Mobil Corp. Times are flush again. Aker is emblematic of how far the Navy Yard has come in a decade: from shriveled military base to 130 businesses and 10,000 employees. The latest arrival, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., will move 1,300 workers, starting Monday into a gleaming all-glass office building near the Navy Yard's front gate.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
In an election year, everything's political. And nothing's more political than the fate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. In June 1991, a base closure commission voted to begin shutting down the yard in 1996. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., and Reps. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., Curt Weldon, R-Pa., and Rob Andrews, D-N.J., filed a lawsuit against the Navy and the commission soon after. Since then, a U.S. District Court judge threw out the case and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to the district court.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
The next 90 days, says U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon, will be "intense. " Weldon led a bipartisan delegation of five local congressmen to Russia last week. They returned with an agreement to explore what could be a great deal for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. If the idea proves environmentally and economically sound, as many as 150 old Soviet warships would be dismantled at the shipyard over the next several years. The plan is to buy the warships for cash - giving the Russians hard currency they desperately need.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
The 195-year-old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was officially closed yesterday, a sobering reminder that the city's reign as a powerhouse of heavy industry is probably over forever. In a somber ceremony under gray skies outside the shipyard's historic Building 4, the American flag was lowered and the log, the daily diary of the yard's activities since 1801, was signed for the final time by the facility's 21st and last commander, Capt. John C. Bergner. About 2,500 people, some of them retired yard workers with tears in their eyes, listened as Bergner and other dignitaries reprised the glorious history of the yard, long the city's largest industrial employer.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY THOMAS M. FOGLIETTA
For the past 194 years, the city of Philadelphia and the Navy have had a contract. Under this contract, the workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard dedicated themselves to safeguarding American security by maintaining the best fleet in the world. In return, the Navy provided good jobs at good wages to generations of workers and their families. While this contract will formally end when the USS John F. Kennedy departs the Navy Yard in September, it does not relieve the Navy of certain responsibilities.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A House Armed Services subcommittee agreed yesterday to spend $10 million in fiscal 1989 to overhaul the firefighting system at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Pa.) said. The money would go toward the second phase of the project to repair and upgrade nearly 18,000 feet of water mains at the Navy Yard. The authorization yesterday, which must be approved by the full committee next week, would complete spending on what last year was estimated at $14 million in necessary water-system reconstruction.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware legislators huddled on Capitol Hill yesterday to begin mapping strategy for the battle to keep the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Naval Base open. The brief meeting ended with the lawmakers, four of the six U.S. senators from the tri-state region and a half-dozen House members, insisting the installation could be spared on merit, while boasting they also had the political muscle to prevail. "The chances are much better than ever of saving the Navy Yard," said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
Imagine suburbanites coming into Philadelphia to beat the wage tax. Bizzaroland? No, Fumoland. State Sen. Vincent Fumo, D-Phila., and City Councilman James Kenney are researching a plan to convert the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into an enterprise zone where workers would pay a lower wage tax than either city dwellers or commuters now pay. "I've always said the two biggest problems in Philadelphia are a lack of leadership and the wage...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012
THE NAVAL Yard a/k/a Urban Outfitter campus is where the young cosmopolitan designers, graphic artists and marketers come to work in the world of style. Here at the creative edge of the city, gals dress for show even if they are just meeting at the company cafeteria for lunch. You'll see an eclectic mix of patterns, heel heights, and outerwear. And the guys aren't slacking, either, going from American heritage style to vintage Levis and Allen Edmonds shoes. Who knew such style could be found on the banks of the Delaware River?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Drexel students closed out this spring's university fashion show season with a group of witty collections that boasted foil-knit sweaters, elaborately draped evening wear, and sportswear inspired by the brown paper bag. The annual, end-of-year presentations were staged Saturday at the Urban Outfitters corporate headquarters in the Navy Yard. The evening's most noteworthy looks included gowns by senior Calla Michaelides and baggy yet femme sportswear - inspired by the arrogant swagger of discontented youth - by sportswear designer Nadhya Sanchez.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHEN America's sweetest heart and most mega of chart-toppers hits town this weekend, she won't need to ask for directions. Wyomissing native Taylor Swift spent the greater part of her 25 years a hop and a skip from Philly. As a girl, the future singer-songwriter and her family spent summers down the Shore in Stone Harbor. At age 11, she sang the national anthem at a Sixers game. Later, Swift won multiple Grammys; beat out Beyonce for a bunch of awards (sorry, Kanye )
BUSINESS
June 4, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the world's leading managers of electricity networks on Tuesday agreed to open a research center in partnership with Pennsylvania State University at the Navy Yard, reinforcing its emergence as a smart-energy campus. Alstom Grid, a unit of French industrial giant Alstom, will open the Microgrid Center of Excellence at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The center will be involved in the deployment of new technologies related to "microgrids," which are localized electrical systems that can operate autonomously from the regional power grid.
NEWS
June 3, 2015
ISSUE | CAMPAIGNS Votes, not dollars Like many of those who advocate that money equals speech, George Will sees it as a violation of free speech to limit a person's right to introduce as much advocacy money as they want into a political campaign ("Enough reform mischief," May 29). But campaign-reform advocates are not trying to limit free speech; they are merely trying to maintain a separate element of democracy: one person, one vote. Just because someone has the loudest horn in the room does not mean he has a right to drown out all others.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investment manager Franklin Square Capital Partners has applied for a $7.5 million grant to build a hotel at Philadelphia's Navy Yard business campus, according to a state report. The property, described as a "luxury boutique hotel," would feature 150 guest rooms, according to the list of applicants to the Redevelopment Capital Assistance Program posted Wednesday on the state's website. No other details, including the prospective hotel's operator and total budget, were disclosed.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind the scenes at the Navy Yard, with its new corporate headquarters and restored 70-year-old buildings, another transformation is taking place that is largely invisible to the public, but that could have far-reaching implications. Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., the agency redeveloping the Navy Yard, is installing a "smart-grid" system on the 1,200-acre campus in South Philadelphia. PIDC envisions constructing an interconnected network of renewable power sources and storage devices in a self-supporting "community" system.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
THE FIRST TIME I did the Broad Street Run, I did it with a bottle of Red Stripe in my hand. I should mention that, by "did," I mean that I lazily watched from a lawn chair outside the old Daily News building, at Broad and Callowhill, and helpfully shared a swig or two with passing runners. That was about 20 years ago, when I was more likely to moonwalk - like, on the actual moon - than run 10 miles down Broad. It wasn't that I was out of shape (I was); it was that running seemed like a needless expenditure of energy that should be otherwise devoted to napping.
REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have you ever dreamed of living seaside at the Navy Yard, the vast onetime shipbuilding hub that's emerged as a hip urban office campus? Soon, you may be able to rent homes in the shadow of mothballed naval ships. The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. is actively negotiating deed restrictions with the U.S. Navy to build housing at Philadelphia's Navy Yard for the first time. John Grady, president of the PIDC, said the agency hopes talks will lead to opening the campus to developer pitches within a year.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lux Products Corp., a privately held HVAC controls company formerly based in Mount Laurel, has relocated its headquarters to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. About 17 employees made the move, said Rob Munin, Lux president. Lux, founded in 1914 and best known for the ubiquitous spring-wound kitchen timers popular in the 1950s and 1960s, is now primarily focused on selling thermostats, which have become increasingly interconnected high-tech devices. Munin said the company neither received nor sought a tax break to move to Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Navy Yard energy-storage firm expects to step up to a bigger stage after its acquisition by renewable-power project developer SunEdison Inc. Solar Grid Storage L.L.C., a start-up formed in 2011 and funded partly with $250,000 in venture capital from the Ben Franklin Technology Partnership, on Thursday announced its sale to SunEdison for an undisclosed sum. Solar Grid has four energy-storage projects, including one that is part of Pennsylvania State...
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