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Navy Yard

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BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Nina Johnsen, wife of Aker Philadelphia Shipyard CEO Kristian Rokke, cracked a champagne bottle over a bow to christen Aker's 18th tanker last week, many of the yard's 1,100 employees cheered. The shipyard, after several lean years, is building two tankers for Exxon Mobil Corp. Times are flush again. Aker is emblematic of how far the Navy Yard has come in a decade: from shriveled military base to 130 businesses and 10,000 employees. The latest arrival, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., will move 1,300 workers, starting Monday into a gleaming all-glass office building near the Navy Yard's front gate.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
In an election year, everything's political. And nothing's more political than the fate of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. In June 1991, a base closure commission voted to begin shutting down the yard in 1996. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., and Reps. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., Curt Weldon, R-Pa., and Rob Andrews, D-N.J., filed a lawsuit against the Navy and the commission soon after. Since then, a U.S. District Court judge threw out the case and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to the district court.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
The next 90 days, says U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon, will be "intense. " Weldon led a bipartisan delegation of five local congressmen to Russia last week. They returned with an agreement to explore what could be a great deal for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. If the idea proves environmentally and economically sound, as many as 150 old Soviet warships would be dismantled at the shipyard over the next several years. The plan is to buy the warships for cash - giving the Russians hard currency they desperately need.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
The 195-year-old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was officially closed yesterday, a sobering reminder that the city's reign as a powerhouse of heavy industry is probably over forever. In a somber ceremony under gray skies outside the shipyard's historic Building 4, the American flag was lowered and the log, the daily diary of the yard's activities since 1801, was signed for the final time by the facility's 21st and last commander, Capt. John C. Bergner. About 2,500 people, some of them retired yard workers with tears in their eyes, listened as Bergner and other dignitaries reprised the glorious history of the yard, long the city's largest industrial employer.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | BY THOMAS M. FOGLIETTA
For the past 194 years, the city of Philadelphia and the Navy have had a contract. Under this contract, the workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard dedicated themselves to safeguarding American security by maintaining the best fleet in the world. In return, the Navy provided good jobs at good wages to generations of workers and their families. While this contract will formally end when the USS John F. Kennedy departs the Navy Yard in September, it does not relieve the Navy of certain responsibilities.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A House Armed Services subcommittee agreed yesterday to spend $10 million in fiscal 1989 to overhaul the firefighting system at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta (D., Pa.) said. The money would go toward the second phase of the project to repair and upgrade nearly 18,000 feet of water mains at the Navy Yard. The authorization yesterday, which must be approved by the full committee next week, would complete spending on what last year was estimated at $14 million in necessary water-system reconstruction.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Reginald Stuart, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware legislators huddled on Capitol Hill yesterday to begin mapping strategy for the battle to keep the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Naval Base open. The brief meeting ended with the lawmakers, four of the six U.S. senators from the tri-state region and a half-dozen House members, insisting the installation could be spared on merit, while boasting they also had the political muscle to prevail. "The chances are much better than ever of saving the Navy Yard," said Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Mark McDonald contributed to this report
Imagine suburbanites coming into Philadelphia to beat the wage tax. Bizzaroland? No, Fumoland. State Sen. Vincent Fumo, D-Phila., and City Councilman James Kenney are researching a plan to convert the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into an enterprise zone where workers would pay a lower wage tax than either city dwellers or commuters now pay. "I've always said the two biggest problems in Philadelphia are a lack of leadership and the wage...
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hoboken Shipyards of Hoboken, N.J., has asked the General Accounting Office to review a contract awarded to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for the overhaul of the Clifton Sprague, a Navy reserve frigate. On Friday, the North Jersey shipyard requested that the GAO determine whether the $4.45 million contract won by the Philadelphia yard included the same costs that the Hoboken yard was required by the Navy to include in its $5.4 million bid. Among them were the cost of lodging and feeding the 220 seamen now on the vessel and the amount of overhead allocated by the Navy to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
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NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A Social Security office on South Broad Street close to the Wells Fargo Center will be closed during the Democratic National Convention, though other nearby businesses say they plan to remain open. Social Security officials said the office at 3336 S. Broad St. will be closed from July 25 to 28 because of the expected DNC-related road closures and heavy traffic. The office will reopen at 9 a.m. July 29. "The street closures and rerouted traffic will make it difficult for our employees as well as the public to access the office," District Manager Joan Permar said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The heyday of the starchitect pretty much ended with the last recession, but there remains one rock-star designer who still commands the attention of people who normally pay little attention to the way buildings look: Bjarke Ingels. Just 41, the Danish-born architect has already been the subject of a New Yorker profile and a Charlie Rose interview . Ingels is a regular on the TED-talk circuit, and was in Philadelphia last month to give the prestigious Louis Kahn lecture . Part of Ingels' appeal is his ability to bring irreverence and fun to architecture, similar to what Ikea did with furniture.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Three dozen city residents and environmental activists asked Philadelphia port officials Tuesday to disqualify the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery from expanding operations at the proposed Southport marine terminal at the Navy Yard. In an emotional outpouring, Maxine McCleary said her family has lived near the refinery on West Passyunk Avenue "for decades" and four of her nine siblings died from respiratory cancer. "I have respiratory problems myself," McCleary told the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority board at its monthly meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman
The dates were so bad, so epically awful, that Angie started blogging about them: The man whose ex-wife showed up in the middle of their restaurant dinner and threatened to kill herself. The guy who suggested they meet in front of a bar, then confessed that he didn't drink and was strapped for cash. There were men who wanted to get married in a hot minute, men who bore no resemblance to their online profile pictures, men who sweated profusely even while sitting still. It was enough to make Angie, then a naval architect in Washington, rethink her longtime life plan: the "forever" guy, the baby, the white picket fence.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
On April 14, the 2016 Philadelphia Antique & Art Show hosted its 54th annual show and preview party under an enormous tent on the Marine Parade grounds of the Navy Yard. The preview party brought in more than 1,000 committee members, patrons, sponsors, exhibitors, and friends for a sneak peek at the timeless treasures, marking the beginning of the three-day show. This year's beneficiary, the Penn Acute Research Collaboration at Penn Medicine, will use the $500,000 raised to bring together physicians and researchers to develop innovations that improve patient care.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Protesters decrying a proposed Navy Yard oil import/export facility rallied outside the Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) refinery in South Philadelphia on Saturday afternoon. PES has proposed building the facility at the planned Southport Marine Terminal Complex at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. Some nearby residents and activists want the company - operator of the former Sunoco refinery in South Philadelphia - to withdraw its proposal, one of six currently before landowner Philadelphia Regional Port Authority.
SPORTS
May 2, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
The Phillies hoped that Adam Morgan would be able to recover the velocity on his fastball after shoulder surgery two years ago sapped the pitch of its speed. Friday night - Morgan's first major-league start this season - was an indication that the fastball is turning a corner. Morgan threw 51 of his retooled fastballs in five innings of a 4-3 win over Cleveland. The pitch, according to PITCHf/x data, zipped at an average speed of 90.8 mph. Morgan's fastball hovered in the low 90s before he had surgery in January 2014 to close a gap in his left shoulder.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell, Staff Writer
After a one-year hiatus, the relaunched Philadelphia antiques show - among the nation's most widely respected events of its kind - returned this weekend with an emphasis on fine art amid its many treasures. Prominent on the show's floor, an "extremely rare" $595,000 copper weather vane of a fireman's hat rested steps from a painting of an outsized bull that's become "priceless" to its antiques-dealer owner. In its 54th showing, the rebranded Philadelphia Antiques and Art Show overflowed with decorative arts, fine porcelain, and uncommon furnishings spanning more than three centuries.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 9, ACHIEVEability hosted Food for Thought at Urban Outfitters at the Navy Yard. The event, attended by 600 supporters, including Mayor Kenney, celebrated the organization's 35 years of breaking the generational cycle of poverty. The crowd enjoyed drinks, dancing, and sampling dishes from more than 25 local restaurants. ACHIEVEability is a member of the Mission First Housing Group, a nonprofit organization that assists low-income, single-parent, and homeless Philadelphia families to become self-sufficient.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has selected the Navy Yard and its "microgrid" as the site for a study on new technology for advanced electrical distribution and controls, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. announced Tuesday. The study, which will take advantage of the Navy Yard's advanced power grid, will focus on how to make local electric distribution systems more reliable and create capabilities for the energy industry to deploy renewable energy within local communities, PIDC said.
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