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Navy Yard

SPORTS
August 27, 1997 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
A new practice facility at the Philadelphia Naval Business Center might keep the Eagles' workdays happy, but it will do nothing to move the football team any closer solving its stadium issues, according to Mayor Rendell. The Eagles and the city are negotiating to move the team's offices and training facilities to the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, probably within two years. Team owner Jeffrey Lurie has said repeatedly part of the problem with Veterans Stadium is the poor physical conditions the team must deal with daily.
NEWS
September 14, 2004
At the base of Broad Street in South Philadelphia lies a prime parcel of land the size of Center City. It is ready to reawaken. Once, 60,000 workers toiled there. But the Philadelphia Navy Base has been largely vacant since the government walked away in 1991. The city has been wrestling with what to do with the land ever since. Last week, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. unveiled an ambitious master plan to fuel a $2 billion transformation of the 1,200-acre base into a mixed-use development where people could work, live and play.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
Kvaerner ASA, the troubled Anglo-Norwegian conglomerate, apparently is not in any rush to sell its shipyards. Kvaerner is transforming the former Philadelphia Naval Yard into a commercial yard. Kvaerner announced last month that it would quit shipbuilding as part of a major corporate overhaul. It intended to reveal its strategy for disposing of the yards at an annual shareholders meeting yesterday. But following the meeting, both the strategy and the fate of those yards remained uncertain.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Closing the Naval Shipyard will deal a "death blow" to Philadelphia, which is already reeling from financial problems, Navy Yard workers said yesterday. "It'll cripple Philadelphia if the shipyard closes," said Pat Carey, a marine pipefitter who with about 120 other employees attended a public hearing on a Navy study of the social and economic impact of the proposed closing. His fears were bolstered by statistics released at yesterday's hearing by Gov. Casey, who said the effects would be far worse than suggested by the Navy study.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
You could hear them coming a block away. Carrying signs, yelling at the top of their lungs and generally raising a ruckus, some 300 workers from the eight Navy Yards across the country - including 250 from Philadelphia - poured into Lafayette Park across from the White House yesterday. They were there to tell George Bush that if he's going to cut defense, he'd better find them jobs. As the workers marched into the park, a singer named David Sawyer belted out a song that reflected their feelings: "We shall not, we shall not be moved," he sang.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Charles Carlson and Ted Shaw had been down in the tunnel more than half an hour when other workmen at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard missed them. The workmen tried to radio them, but Carlson and Shaw never answered the calls. Later yesterday morning, rescuers found the two men dead inside the tunnel, victims of a searing, 350-degree steam leak. "The steam filled the area almost instantly and there was no chance of escape," said Navy Yard spokesman Al Peterson. "It's a great tragedy . . . especially for the families of those killed," said Sen. John Heinz, R-Pa.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Faced with community protests, the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard has agreed to continue its moratorium on burning PCB-contaminated oil for two more weeks while neighbors obtain more information about the process. Capt. Jon C. Bergner, shipyard commander, announced the extended moratorium yesterday after two dozen activists gathered at the shipyard gate and delivered a letter seeking the delay. Bergner said he still thought burning 70,000 gallons of oil tainted with the suspected cancer-causing material was the safest way to get rid of it. But, he added, "as a neighbor, I cannot turn my back on the concerns of the South Philadelphia residents.
NEWS
June 12, 1988
As the USS Independence headed to sea Monday, the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard was hearing heady praise for its three-year rejuvenation of the aircraft carrier. The upbeat sendoff couldn't have been better timed, coming less than a week after reports that one in every five jobs at the Navy's eight shipyards around the country will disappear by 1991. As these shipyards joust with each other, and with private shipyards, for a piece of the Navy's shrinking business and for survival itself, each needs to polish up its reputation for quality work.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
In a move that virtually doomed the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Navy Base, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to approve shutting those facilities and 33 other military installations. On a 364-60 vote, the House also approved reductions at 48 other bases nationwide. The closures and reductions, part of the effort to scale down the military as the Cold War ends, had been recommended by a special independent federal panel and approved by President Bush. Under the rules governing the cuts, only a vote by both houses of Congress to disapprove the list in its entirety could cancel the closures.
NEWS
May 30, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Navy Yard eagles nest - the first in Philadelphia in two centuries - has failed, wildlife officials said yesterday. Although it is impossible to confirm, they suspect that one or more eggs hatched April 4 and that another large bird or a raccoon then killed and ate the young a day or so later. In any given year, about 20 percent of eagles nests fail for any number of reasons, said Doug Gross, a wildlife biologist with the Pennsylvania Game Commission. This year, five other nests among about 100 statewide have failed, including one near the Pickering Creek Reservoir in Chester County.
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