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Navy Yard

NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
SPORTS
May 6, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was only last month when Mourad Marofit moved from New York to Philadelphia with some of his Moroccan countrymen to carry out their training at Wissahickon Valley Park. He fell in love with the park's scenery and tree-lined paths almost immediately. Marofit found that same satisfaction Sunday on Broad Street, and despite a record field of 40,000 runners and thousands who lined Philadelphia's main thoroughfare, he turned it into his own solitary path, dominating the 35th annual Blue Cross Broad Street Run for a convincing 45-second victory.
SPORTS
May 5, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Chesterton said he hasn't raced a ton competitively since graduating from Haverford College in 2011, but he'll be at the start line with thousands of others Sunday at the Broad Street Run. He's a rookie in this race. "I talked to a bunch of people who are running Broad Street," Chesterton said Friday. "The one thing they talk about is how great the crowds are. People who are running for fun, having crowds and that kind of support certainly helps. A lot of people have never run 10 miles in their life.
SPORTS
May 2, 2014 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer
MARKING THE 35th year of Philadelphia's largest race, the Blue Cross Broad Street Run will offer a chance for some 40,000 runners to cross the finish line on Sunday. The 10-mile race begins at Broad Street and West Fisher Avenue at 8:30 a.m. and will take runners past such landmarks as Temple University, City Hall, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Avenue of the Arts and the Philadelphia stadium complex before ending in the Navy Yard. The run will feature increased security for the second consecutive year due to the Boston Marathon bombings last April.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE ARE so many elements that need addressing for the 76ers to seriously start the rebuild they're currently in, with a new practice facility being at or near the top of the list. But sources have told the Daily News that some employees have been told that the plan of building at the Navy Yard has been scratched, leaving management frantically searching for a place to build a state-of-the-art facility they can call their own. Currently, the Sixers practice at the gym at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, which doesn't provide the intimacy or the updated equipment that most other teams in the league already have.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia, teetering on the edge of the world stage, wants a leading role. Enter the Global Philadelphia Association. GPA, in conjunction with Mayor Nutter's administration, is pressing the city's case that it should be added to the list of World Heritage Cities, a designation seen as a further boost to Philadelphia as an attraction for international tourists. The city's efforts secured a visit last week from Denis Ricard, secretary general of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC)
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was like living aboard a floating city. There was recreation. Allen Polixa, a crew member on the USS Forrestal from 1980 to 1982, often took "swim breaks" miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, jumping into the water from just below the ship's top deck. There was order. Fight a colleague or steal from another crew member, said Jimmie Stewart, who served on the Forrestal from 1960 to 1962, and it was down to the brig. No questions asked. And there was chaos. In July 1967, a devastating fire and a series of chain-reaction explosions took the lives of 134 sailors aboard the Forrestal.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Weather permitting, the USS Forrestal will leave the Navy Yard on Tuesday on its last voyage - to a scrap facility in Texas. The Navy has paid one cent under a contract to have the 60-year-old vessel dismantled by All Star Metals in the Gulf port of Brownsville. The Forrestal, the first of the post-World War II supercarriers, already has been stripped to the steel and will make its way to Texas under tow instead of its own power. The Navy said All Star Metals had contracted with Foss Marine Towing for the job. No time has been announced yet for the ship's departure from the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WHEN A relentless winter storm buried the city under 14 inches of snow Tuesday, plenty of people knew they were in for a long, miserable night. Canceled flights. Delayed trains. Car rides that were destined to end soon after they started on the side of some whited-out road. But there was a silver lining amid all of the white stuff if you happened to be in a certain stretch of South Philly: the Marriott's brand-new hotel in the Navy Yard was open, and eager to take on guests. The Courtyard Philadelphia South at the Navy Yard, which opened for the first time earlier this month, sold out all of its 172 rooms on the night of the storm, said Jennifer Tran, manager of the Navy Yard's marketing and communications for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once Marcelo J. Rouco decided on Philadelphia as the location for the North American headquarters of his Australian energy-efficiency firm, Ecosave Inc., he went all in. Last June, he paid $4.2 million for a small engineering firm in Bristol, DVL Automation, as a beachhead for his North American expansion. He also bought a Center City house and relocated his wife and two children from Down Under. "Australia is a great place, but a smaller market, only 21 million people," said Rouco, 44. "So I expect the North American office to generate a lot more revenue than the Australian office.
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