CollectionsNavy Yard
IN THE NEWS

Navy Yard

BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Maybe it's not really La Peg's fault. It's still getting its sea legs - perhaps "river legs" would be a better descriptor - at the foot of the Ben Franklin Bridge, just across the hiss of Columbus Boulevard from the Race Street Pier. But my first experience in the soaring space in the reimagined 1903-vintage redbrick FringeArts Building - months before the La Peg move-in, and the rise of its menu of what chef-owner Peter Woolsey calls "French-ish" brasserie fare, and its beer garden strung with lights - was so uproarious that, well, La Peg seemed in my recent visits like a wallflower at its own party.
FOOD
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Lo Spiedo opening Monday As you drive through the iron gates of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia, look to your left at the gatehouse. On Monday, the Vetri crew - Marc Vetri, Jeff Benjamin, Brad Spence, and Jeff Michaud - plans to open Lo Spiedo (4501 S. Broad St., 215-282-3184). "Lo spee-YAY-doh" translates to "the spit," as in rotisserie, and just about the entire menu - executed by Osteria alum Scott Calhoun - is prepared over wood-burning flame: pork ribs, pork shoulder, half-chicken, brisket, octopus.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sinkler A. Casselle Sr., 93, of Deptford, a naval architect at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from 1950 to 1977, died Sunday, Sept. 7, at Inspira Medical Center in Woodbury. Mr. Casselle was involved with "the design and development of submarines; he helped with the structural design of them," a niece, Melanie Wright, said. He won an award from the Portsmouth (N.H.) Naval Shipyard for his work on the submarine Jack in 1961, she said. He won an outstanding service award from the Navy Yard in 1966 for development of a sonar detection system for submarines, she said.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority will seek "expressions of interest" to develop the 200 acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The board agreed at its monthly meeting Tuesday to accept proposals - called "request for expressions of interest" - from terminal operators, steamship lines, automobile manufacturers, energy companies, and investment firms with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cloud computing, in which companies move key services out of their office servers to outside locations run by giant tech providers, isn't just consolidating business computing in the hands of specialists. It is also creating more demand for local data centers to handle rapid connections among smaller businesses and more complex service networks, says Keao Caindec, a 1991 Wharton School graduate who was back in Philadelphia recently, making his rounds as chief marketing officer for 365 Data Centers.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Aker Philadelphia shipyard, awarded approximately a half-billion dollars in taxpayer subsidies when Tom Ridge and Ed Rendell were Pennsylvania's governors, is now looking to borrow $100 million through "international capital markets," according to a stock exchange filing in Norway, the parent company's home. The financial resourcing from the state was meant to create or preserve hundreds of trade union jobs at the former Navy Yard. This is a good sign for Aker, writes Aaron Kelley, a shipping analyst: "The search for new sources of financing and other initiatives involving the yard, which is one of two that are active in the construction of Jones Act tankers, serves as a testament to the underlying strength of the group and its core markets.
FOOD
June 27, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
As Cristina Martinez heated a wide maguey leaf on the food cart's griddle, her husband, Benjamin Miller, reached into a warming box holding slow-cooked barbacoa lamb, and the earthy aromas of Capulhuac, Mexico, suddenly wafted over this South Philly corner at Eighth and Watkins Streets. "You want rib meat, leg, or spine?" asks Miller, assembling a one-pound package of moist flesh to be gift-wrapped inside the maguey leaf, with a pint of lamb consomme, spicy cactus salad, and a stack of fresh tortillas on the side.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
PHILADELPHIA cyclists, rejoice! City Council's Transportation and Public Utilities Committee approved a bill yesterday that would pave the way for a bike sharing program in Philadelphia The bill, introduced by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, now moves to Council for a full vote. "Bike sharing will bring Philadelphia to the next level of bike friendliness, sustainability and put us on par with tourism and hospitality destination cities across the world," said Reynolds Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014 | BY TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
    BEFORE the Philadelphia Orchestra departs on a three-week visit to Asia with Yannick Nezet-Seguin, making his first tour with the musicians, they're offering six free programs throughout the region. Designed to reach audiences in different venues, and in collaborative participation with other organizations, the week could be seen as a present to the public after Yannick's second season here. To make that gift, the 95-member ensemble will split into smaller groups, the better to reach more neighborhoods.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|