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Nazi Concentration Camps

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NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodor Szehinskyj should have left the country long ago, federal officials say. It's been years since he lost his last deportation appeal. It's been more than a decade since he was ordered out in the first place - since he was accused of serving as a guard at Nazi concentration camps in Germany, Poland, and his native Ukraine. He remains under "a final order of removal," the Justice Department said Friday, and an organization that attempts to hunt down alleged Nazi war criminals recently placed him on its "most wanted" list.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The Nazi persecution of the Jews entered a chapter of brutality 50 years ago this Wednesday with a night of terror that left 7,500 Jewish businesses and 177 synagogues demolished. Later known as Kristallnacht, or night of the broken glass, the violence touched virtually city and village in Germany. Rabbi emeritus Fred Susman of Beth Israel Synagogue at Fifth and Harmony Streets in Coatesville will speak about Kristallnacht and the Holocaust on Friday night at 8 p.m. during the regular Sabbath services.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph H. Stalbaum, 76, who for three decades was chief executive officer of a Center City travel agency and was active in area community groups, died Friday at Hollywood Memorial Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Mr. Stalbaum left Bartlett Tours when his family sold the business in 1986. He had spent the last few winters in Florida. In World War II, Mr. Stalbaum served in a battalion in Europe that liberated Nazi concentration camps. He was active for years in the Max Slepin Post of the American Legion.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WARSAW EX-COMMUNIST BOSS MURDERED A former Communist prime minister and his wife were found murdered today in their suburban home, his body showing signs of torture, police said. Piotr Jaroszewicz, who was 82, served as prime minister from 1970 until he was forced to resign in 1980 as a scapegoat for the country's economic woes and the rise of the Solidarity movement. Jaroszewicz was hanged and his body showed signs of torture, while his wife, Alicja Solska, was killed by a shot from a hunting rifle, the PAP news agency quoted Interior Ministry spokesman Piotr Szczypinski as saying.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Petro Mirchuk, 85, a historical author who survived Nazi concentration camps and lived to see his lifelong dream of an independent Ukraine, died Sunday at Jeanes Hospital in Philadelphia after a long illness. He lived in Fox Chase. Born in western Ukraine, Mr. Mirchuk first became active in the Ukrainian liberation movement as a youth and was imprisoned six times by Polish authorities for his activities. With the outbreak of World War II, he was arrested by the Gestapo along with other members of the Ukrainian anti-Nazi movement and spent four years in the camps, withering to 70 pounds before being liberated by American troops in 1945.
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | By HELEN THOMAS
IF THERE EVER was a time when Americans should speak up on behalf of people in this country whose rights are being abridged, that time is now. I remember with tremendous sadness the statement of Martin Niemoller, a Lutheran minister in Berlin, after World War II as a warning of what can happen when people do not come to the defense of others. Niemoller said, "In Germany they came first for the Communists and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a communist. Then they came for the Jews and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
Ani ma-amin. I believe. Those words of faith about the coming of the Messiah were on the lips of many Jews as they died in Nazi concentration camps. "They recited them each day in their prayers," said Rabbi Eliott Perlstein, "and they recited them their last day as they were led to their death. They still believed. " Rabbi Perlstein read a prayer he wrote, "I believe," at an event marking the Holocaust attended by members of six Bucks County congregations and the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fritz Nova, 80, whose escape from Nazi Germany planted a love of democracy that he tried to impart to his political science students at Villanova University, died Thursday at his home in Newville, Pa. He formerly lived in Berwyn. Born in Berlin, Mr. Nova narrowly escaped from Germany after the Nazis rose to power, then returned with the U.S. Army as an interrogator of Nazi war criminals and others. In an Inquirer interview in 1985, Mr. Nova recalled how an SS border guard let him cross the Austrian border to safety in 1936.
NEWS
April 17, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Fox, 82, of Huntingdon Valley, a retired union official and a Holocaust survivor, died of cancer Wednesday at his daughter Lynne's home in Dresher. From 1981 until his retirement in 1999, Mr. Fox was manager of the Philadelphia joint board and international vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. He had worked for the union since becoming a business agent in 1966. Mr. Fox was born in Tuszyn, Poland. He was 11 in 1939 when the Germans invaded his homeland and forced him to work in a glass factory and in army stables.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a child, Gerhard Vogel watched in horror as the Nazis burned synagogues and Jewish businesses in his native Germany. Yesterday, 59 years after he watched those flames, Vogel recalled them at a new museum designed to keep memories of the Holocaust alive. On the anniversary of Kristallnacht, a German word meaning "the night of shattered glass," Vogel and hundreds of others gathered to dedicate the Goodwin Holocaust Museum in Cherry Hill. "[The Holocaust] was the biggest mass murder and annihilation in the history of mankind," said Vogel.
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NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodor Szehinskyj should have left the country long ago, federal officials say. It's been years since he lost his last deportation appeal. It's been more than a decade since he was ordered out in the first place - since he was accused of serving as a guard at Nazi concentration camps in Germany, Poland, and his native Ukraine. He remains under "a final order of removal," the Justice Department said Friday, and an organization that attempts to hunt down alleged Nazi war criminals recently placed him on its "most wanted" list.
NEWS
December 22, 2010 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writers
Anthony Morrone still carries with him the images of the hundreds of emaciated and hopeless faces he encountered upon storming Germany's largest concentration camp as a young radio operator with the Army in 1945. He has, quite literally, kept their pictures with him through the decades since. The South Philadelphia native carries the photos snapped during the liberation of Buchenwald to presentations he has given, recalling that day for countless student and community groups, hoping he'll encounter people who survived the horrors of that concentration camp.
NEWS
April 17, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Fox, 82, of Huntingdon Valley, a retired union official and a Holocaust survivor, died of cancer Wednesday at his daughter Lynne's home in Dresher. From 1981 until his retirement in 1999, Mr. Fox was manager of the Philadelphia joint board and international vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. He had worked for the union since becoming a business agent in 1966. Mr. Fox was born in Tuszyn, Poland. He was 11 in 1939 when the Germans invaded his homeland and forced him to work in a glass factory and in army stables.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Visitors who enter Michael Kenna's photography exhibit at Michener/Doylestown feel the anguish quickly. Kenna's display, "Impossible to Forget: The Nazi Camps Fifty Years After," consists of more than 80 black-and-white photos that are a melancholy reminder of life - and death - under a totalitarian regime. This determined English photographer spent 12 years making a vast number of photos about the Holocaust by repeatedly visiting the Nazi concentration camps in all of the countries the Third Reich occupied.
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | By HELEN THOMAS
IF THERE EVER was a time when Americans should speak up on behalf of people in this country whose rights are being abridged, that time is now. I remember with tremendous sadness the statement of Martin Niemoller, a Lutheran minister in Berlin, after World War II as a warning of what can happen when people do not come to the defense of others. Niemoller said, "In Germany they came first for the Communists and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a communist. Then they came for the Jews and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
News about ordinary trouble is seeping back into our awareness: a barge crashes into a bridge in Texas, killing five; an Amish father is charged with molesting his daughters; a wildfire rages through Washington state. Obituaries, separated on the page from those of the victims of the terrorist attacks, tell of old men who lived to know their great-grandchildren and young women who succumbed to breast cancer. Children come home from school in tears because someone called them "Butthead" during a game of flag football.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Petro Mirchuk, 85, a historical author who survived Nazi concentration camps and lived to see his lifelong dream of an independent Ukraine, died Sunday at Jeanes Hospital in Philadelphia after a long illness. He lived in Fox Chase. Born in western Ukraine, Mr. Mirchuk first became active in the Ukrainian liberation movement as a youth and was imprisoned six times by Polish authorities for his activities. With the outbreak of World War II, he was arrested by the Gestapo along with other members of the Ukrainian anti-Nazi movement and spent four years in the camps, withering to 70 pounds before being liberated by American troops in 1945.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Of the 70,000 Jews taken to Nazi concentration camps from the Greek city of Salonika, only 2,000 survived. One of them was Michael Levy. And to him, every day after his liberation by American soldiers was a gift. His new life in America, his children, his grandchildren - he had them all because he had survived. And so he took advantage of life, embracing it. "He always had a positive attitude about him," said his son, Irv. "He was just not one to get depressed about things, to focus on the negative.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Within minutes of meeting the author, Akinwole Garrett was already on page five of the book All But My Life. Written by Gerda Weissmann Klein, it is the story of her three-year experience in Nazi concentration camps. Garrett, 16, said he had heard of the Holocaust, but never thought about the personal experiences of the victims until he heard Klein speak. "She is someone who experienced true hardship and still she tells people not to worry, but be grateful for every day," Garrett said.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a child, Gerhard Vogel watched in horror as the Nazis burned synagogues and Jewish businesses in his native Germany. Yesterday, 59 years after he watched those flames, Vogel recalled them at a new museum designed to keep memories of the Holocaust alive. On the anniversary of Kristallnacht, a German word meaning "the night of shattered glass," Vogel and hundreds of others gathered to dedicate the Goodwin Holocaust Museum in Cherry Hill. "[The Holocaust] was the biggest mass murder and annihilation in the history of mankind," said Vogel.
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