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Nazi War Crimes

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NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stooped, slightly dazed, and hobbling with a cane for support, 89-year-old Johann Breyer shuffled into a federal courtroom Wednesday to account once again for his role in atrocities committed nearly a lifetime ago. Federal authorities arrested the retired Northeast Philadelphia toolmaker, who worked as an armed guard at two Nazi death camps during World War II, and said they would support a bid to send him back to Germany, where he was charged Tuesday...
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodor Szehinskyj should have left the country long ago, federal officials say. It's been years since he lost his last deportation appeal. It's been more than a decade since he was ordered out in the first place - since he was accused of serving as a guard at Nazi concentration camps in Germany, Poland, and his native Ukraine. He remains under "a final order of removal," the Justice Department said Friday, and an organization that attempts to hunt down alleged Nazi war criminals recently placed him on its "most wanted" list.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Seasoned Nazi-watchers in this country weren't impressed by Attorney General Edwin Meese's sudden decision to flag Austrian President Kurt Waldheim on the basis of his apparent complicity in Nazi war crimes. The way these knowledgeable observers perceived it, when Meese finally did make the right move, it was for the wrong reasons. Meese had been procrastinating on this case ever since the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations recommended a year ago that Waldheim be officially barred from ever visting the U.S. As recently as April 1, Meese spokesman Patrick Korten said the attorney general did not regard Waldheim's status as "an immediate, burning issue" or "a priority.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
Among tonight's best bets: Two PBS documentaries tackle troubling topics, NBC presents the network premiere of an Academy Award-winning drama and American music honors its own at the Grammy Award ceremonies. WHO'S THE BOSS? (8 p.m., Ch. 6) - It's always a treat when James Coco makes an appearance on this show as Tony's larcenous father-in-law, Nick. And it's good to see that the writers have decided to let him out of prison - legally, that is. His ability to break out of the slammer whenever he wanted to talk to Tony was getting a little unbelievable, even for TV. Tonight, his latest scam is a diet book he wrote in prison, with the less-than-subtle title Blimpos Behind Bars.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
The Austrians aren't alone in their confusion over how to deal with the controversy surrounding President Kurt Waldheim. Unresolved questions about Waldheim's wartime past have been creating problems for the British, as well. When information surfaced in the spring of 1986 that Waldheim had concealed his role as a Wehrmacht intelligence officer during the Nazis' atrocity-ridden campaign in the Balkans, the initial British press reaction was that the implications of this disclosure were being blown out of proportion by the World Jewish Congress.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast Philadelphia man accused of Nazi war crimes died Tuesday night, just hours before a federal judge signed off on his extradition to Germany to stand trial for his role as an armed guard at the infamous Auschwitz death camp. The order would have needed the approval of the U.S. secretary of state before extradition could have taken place. Johann Breyer, 89, died Tuesday night at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, his attorney Dennis Boyle told the Associated Press on Wednesday.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Tobias Peter, Inquirer Staff Writer
The note is on a small, yellow piece of paper, written out in thin letters, all capitals. It is pinned to the door of the modest rowhouse in Northeast Philadelphia, where enough visitors have come in recent days to warrant a pointed warning: "WE DO NOT HAVE ANY COMMENT," it reads. "PLEASE LEAVE. " The resident, a retired toolmaker named Johann "Hans" Breyer, has lived on this well-kept block for 3 1/2 decades, according to property records. His past, as a guard at Auschwitz during World War II, again came back to haunt him last month when authorities in Germany announced that he is under investigation.
NEWS
November 18, 1995
THE U.S. AND THE U.N. Paul Rash (letter, Nov. 4): More than 50,000 men died in Vietnam because the Democrat-controlled Congress refused to declare war on the North Vietnamese. When you use military force on a member nation of the United Nations and you don't declare war, you must alert the U.N. to the military operations you are going to take. The U.N. then alerts all members of the U.N., who alert non-members to whom they are sympathetic. If Spec. Michael New is performing a "peace operation" and is captured wearing the banner of the U.N., he is not entitled to the protection of the Geneva Convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How do you reconcile the reality of your tender, loving father with accusations that during World War II he may well have been a sadistic Nazi? For Anne, a 40ish Australian mother of two, it is irreconcilable. No way her German immigrant dad Joe - who affectionately escorts his granddaughters to school every morning - could be guilty of these 1990 tabloid TV allegations. Yet according to a Russian immigrant named Iya, in Lithuania circa 1940 Joe was one of the Nazi soldiers who dug a mass grave for Jews and executed dozens point-blank.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Klaus Barbie's defense team yesterday accused France of racism for putting Barbie on trial for alleged Nazi war crimes while ignoring the slayings of Algerian civilians by the French during Algeria's war for independence. Barbie, head of the Gestapo in the Lyon area during the Nazi occupation of France, has been on trial since May 11 on charges of crimes against humanity in the deportation, torture or murder of hundreds of Jews and Resistance members in 1943 and 1944. Chief defense attorney Jacques Verges and his two assistants - Algerian lawyer Nabil Bouaita and Congolese lawyer Jean-Martin M'Bemba - made no attempt yesterday to refute specific charges leveled against Barbie.
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NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast Philadelphia man accused of Nazi war crimes died Tuesday night, just hours before a federal judge signed off on his extradition to Germany to stand trial for his role as an armed guard at the infamous Auschwitz death camp. The order would have needed the approval of the U.S. secretary of state before extradition could have taken place. Johann Breyer, 89, died Tuesday night at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, his attorney Dennis Boyle told the Associated Press on Wednesday.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stooped, slightly dazed, and hobbling with a cane for support, 89-year-old Johann Breyer shuffled into a federal courtroom Wednesday to account once again for his role in atrocities committed nearly a lifetime ago. Federal authorities arrested the retired Northeast Philadelphia toolmaker, who worked as an armed guard at two Nazi death camps during World War II, and said they would support a bid to send him back to Germany, where he was charged Tuesday...
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodor Szehinskyj should have left the country long ago, federal officials say. It's been years since he lost his last deportation appeal. It's been more than a decade since he was ordered out in the first place - since he was accused of serving as a guard at Nazi concentration camps in Germany, Poland, and his native Ukraine. He remains under "a final order of removal," the Justice Department said Friday, and an organization that attempts to hunt down alleged Nazi war criminals recently placed him on its "most wanted" list.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Tobias Peter, Inquirer Staff Writer
The note is on a small, yellow piece of paper, written out in thin letters, all capitals. It is pinned to the door of the modest rowhouse in Northeast Philadelphia, where enough visitors have come in recent days to warrant a pointed warning: "WE DO NOT HAVE ANY COMMENT," it reads. "PLEASE LEAVE. " The resident, a retired toolmaker named Johann "Hans" Breyer, has lived on this well-kept block for 3 1/2 decades, according to property records. His past, as a guard at Auschwitz during World War II, again came back to haunt him last month when authorities in Germany announced that he is under investigation.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Davis Rising, Matt Moore and Randy Herschaft, Associated Press
Germany has launched a war-crimes investigation of an 87-year-old Northeast Philadelphia man it accuses of serving as an SS guard at the Auschwitz death camp, the Associated Press has learned, following years of failed U.S. Justice Department efforts to have the man stripped of his American citizenship and deported. Johann "Hans" Breyer, a retired toolmaker, admits he was a guard at Auschwitz during World War II, but told the AP he was stationed outside the facility and had nothing to do with the wholesale slaughter of about 1.5 million Jews and others behind the gates.
NEWS
August 6, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Winton Robbins, 86, who, as a lawyer in his 20s went to Nuremberg, Germany, to help prosecute Nazi war criminals and was one of the last Allied officials to interrogate Field Marshal Hermann Goering, died Tuesday at home in Newtown Square of brain cancer. Mr. Robbins, who went on to a successful career as a corporate attorney in Jenkintown, spoke little of his Nuremberg days until the last decade, when he began accepting speaking engagements - at the Holocaust museum, colleges, synagogues and other forums - to describe the horror he had confronted at the end of World War II, his son, Mark, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An old-time studio mogul once notoriously dismissed movies that aspired to social conscience with the advice: "If you want to send a message, call Western Union. " In the 1950s and 1960s, you would have been better advised to call Stanley Kramer, especially if you wanted your message shaped in an accessible way that reached masses of filmgoers. Mr. Kramer, 87, who died of pneumonia on Monday in Woodland Hills, Calif., was a prolific and influential producer-director in postwar Hollywood.
NEWS
November 18, 1995
THE U.S. AND THE U.N. Paul Rash (letter, Nov. 4): More than 50,000 men died in Vietnam because the Democrat-controlled Congress refused to declare war on the North Vietnamese. When you use military force on a member nation of the United Nations and you don't declare war, you must alert the U.N. to the military operations you are going to take. The U.N. then alerts all members of the U.N., who alert non-members to whom they are sympathetic. If Spec. Michael New is performing a "peace operation" and is captured wearing the banner of the U.N., he is not entitled to the protection of the Geneva Convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How do you reconcile the reality of your tender, loving father with accusations that during World War II he may well have been a sadistic Nazi? For Anne, a 40ish Australian mother of two, it is irreconcilable. No way her German immigrant dad Joe - who affectionately escorts his granddaughters to school every morning - could be guilty of these 1990 tabloid TV allegations. Yet according to a Russian immigrant named Iya, in Lithuania circa 1940 Joe was one of the Nazi soldiers who dug a mass grave for Jews and executed dozens point-blank.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
The Austrians aren't alone in their confusion over how to deal with the controversy surrounding President Kurt Waldheim. Unresolved questions about Waldheim's wartime past have been creating problems for the British, as well. When information surfaced in the spring of 1986 that Waldheim had concealed his role as a Wehrmacht intelligence officer during the Nazis' atrocity-ridden campaign in the Balkans, the initial British press reaction was that the implications of this disclosure were being blown out of proportion by the World Jewish Congress.
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