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Nba Lockout

NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tuesday marked the 75th day of the NBA lockout and Tyreke Evans is considering his options if an agreement is not reached between owners and the players association. One of them, of course, is playing overseas. "I love the game so much," he said. "Working out ain't gonna do it for me. I'd rather play somewhere. If I have an opportunity to go overseas and play, I'd have to think about it. " Evans, set to enter his third season with the Sacramento Kings, was at Science and Discovery High in Chester on Tuesday afternoon, giving back to his hometown.
SPORTS
June 30, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer Associated Press
When the 29 NBA team player representatives and the nine members of the executive committee of the players association meet July 6 to 12 in Maui, Hawaii, they'll be able to literally and figuratively draw lines in the sand. That's when the union leaders will decide how to proceed after being locked out at midnight tonight by the league owners. Commissioner David Stern and deputy commissioner Russ Granik announced the work stoppage yesterday, in effect ceasing all basketball-related operations until a new collective bargaining agreement is reached.
SPORTS
December 26, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Principal negotiators for the NBA and its players union will speak this weekend by telephone and meet to negotiate again next week, Billy Hunter, the union's executive director, said yesterday from his home in Oakland, Calif. Hunter and NBA commissioner David Stern met secretly Wednesday night in Los Angeles. Stern has not commented publicly on the meeting, which was aimed at ending the six-month-old lockout. "We agreed to sit down for a further discussion that might be meaningful, that might go somewhere.
SPORTS
October 30, 1998 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The NBA lockout has been tough on basketball fans all over, but it's a good bet that few have felt the impact as much as Henry "Que" Gaskins. Each day the stars of the NBA sit out is another day for Gaskins to fret about how the time off will ultimately affect his favorite multi-million dollar player, Allen Iverson. "This was going to be a big season for Allen, with the All-Star Game in Philadelphia giving him a chance to win on national TV," Gaskins said. "Without it, it [would]
SPORTS
October 22, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judging by yesterday's meeting at Caesars Palace between the NBA players' union and its Agents Advisory Committee, the entire NBA season is in jeopardy. Presenting a unified front, union officials, along with 25 agents who represent about 90 percent of the league's players, reiterated their intent to fight to the finish, vowing to miss the whole season if necessary. The players are scheduled to meet here today. Union officials said that a decertification movement was possible; that they would join with the agents to finance any player in need; and that they could announce as early as today the collaboration of a small group of agents who would put on an exhibition game in Las Vegas "in the near future" to raise funds.
SPORTS
June 21, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last November, the first piercing shot was fired straight at the front door of the National Basketball Players Association and its executive director, Billy Hunter. The NBA signed a four-year, $2.64 billion guaranteed television deal with NBC and Turner Broadcasting, then made like a subway panhandler. It declared that 13 of its 29 teams were losing money, that it was tired of escalating player salaries, and that cash from the TV deal would come to the owners and the league - but not the players - if a new collective-bargaining agreement wasn't reached by July 1. Seven months later, shrapnel is still flying.
SPORTS
August 1, 1995 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lou Roe never needed the casinos to gamble. In this city of extremes, the posh and the deprived, only one side of life was available when Roe was growing up. And it wasn't the one with neon lights, slot machines, marquee boxing matches and Donald Trump. "This is the other side of town," Roe said, pointing to a two-story, brown, run-down housing project beside a string of age-worn buildings just off the Atlantic City Expressway. "This is the side I'm most familiar with, where taking a legitimate chance at a better life might turn a lot of people against you. The side with a lot of good people just trying to survive, willing to do almost anything to get out. " In others' eyes, Roe has been gone for a while.
SPORTS
November 22, 2011 | BY RICH HOFMANN, hofmanr@phillynews.com
THE PEOPLE have spoken: Hip Hop is no more. Seeing as how there is no actual basketball to talk about during the NBA lockout, this qualifies as big Sixers news. After receiving hundreds of communications from fans, nearly all of them advocating the end of a symbol of a different era, the team's new ownership will announce today that the never-beloved mascot has been put out to pasture, literally. To spare the sensibilities of the one or two children who weren't scared to death by the rabbit, the team will say that Hip Hop fell in love, married and moved away to start a family.
SPORTS
July 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Agent Steve Kauffman, upset that because of the NBA lockout the Celtics will not honor a loan provision in Dominique Wilkins's contract, said the veteran is "seriously considering" suing for breach of contract. Kauffman said the availability of the $8.4 million loan was a separate clause in Wilkins's contract and "was supposed to be honored without any contingencies, including a work stoppage. " Celtics officials declined comment. Jeffrey Mishkin, senior vice president of legal affairs for the NBA, said the team's interpretation of the loan status is correct.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
The NBA lockout may have sidelined Dwyane Wade's basketball career, but one of his former employers would welcome him back - as a fried chicken server. Kentucky Fried Chicken sent a letter to the Miami Heat guard - who used to serve chicken before his professional career took off - offering him a position at his local drive- thru. "We've always been proud to call you a former KFC employee, and it goes without saying we'd love to have you back on our team dishing out the World's Best Chicken, like you dish out assists on the court," the letter quipped.
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