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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
As a reward for more than three years of exemplary service, good soldier Jay Leno will replace Johnny Carson as host of "The Tonight Show" when Carson retires in May, NBC announced yesterday. Carson, who fine-tuned "Tonight" over 30 years into the model for all late-night talk shows, gave comedian Leno a trial run on the job by naming him his "permanent guest host" in September 1987. Since then, Leno's hosted the show every Tuesday night and during Carson's 15 weeks of vacation a year.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
Late-night talk- show host David Letterman has accepted an offer from CBS that would pay him $16 million a year to leave NBC, The New York Times reported today. The deal would include giving the 45-year-old comic his own show opposite NBC-TV's Jay Leno, who hosts the "Tonight" show in the 11:30 p.m. weeknight slot, the newspaper said. Leno makes $3 million a year, it said. At his height, longtime "Tonight" show host Johnny Carson, who retired in May, raked in $15 million a year.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By ELIZABETH JENSEN, New York Daily News
As the Summer Olympics approach, NBC Sports officials are sweating out the latest glitches to pop up, ones involving the schedule and their star host. The games are scheduled for Seoul, South Korea, from Sept. 17 to Oct. 2, and South Korean opposition leaders, flexing their new political muscle following a strong showing in National Assembly elections last month, have just called on the government to repeal daylight-saving time, which took effect May 8. The shift to DST puts the country 14 hours ahead of the United States (Eastern time)
SPORTS
July 21, 1996 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In many ways, the Olympics are the ultimate TV show - an intriguing blend of competitions stretched over 17 days, interspersed with profiles of the competitors designed to bring them to life for an audience only marginally acquainted with their specialties. It's a decidedly expensive TV show - NBA paid more than $450 million for the rights to broadcast the Centennial Games from Atlanta - but apparently well worth the cost. Network research indicates that more than 200 million Americans will watch at least one segment of the Games.
LIVING
November 4, 1994 | LOS ANGELES TIMES This article contains information from Inquirer television critic Jonathan Storm
The sense of nausea and panic that used to grip NBC executives every morning when they got the ratings flashes on Jay Leno's Tonight Show is easing. Still smarting from making one of the worst blunders in TV history, NBC executives are taking heart as Leno's audience has been growing this fall. That blunder, of course, was the decision to replace Johnny Carson with Leno, and as a result send David Letterman into the arms of CBS, where he won a $42 million, three-year contract to go against Leno weeknights.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IF CONAN O'BRIEN wins an Emmy Sunday night - a definite possibility, says TV writer Ellen Gray - someone at host network NBC may have his finger poised near the censor button. No one's really concerned that the former "Tonight" show host will turn into Conan the Vulgarian, there are simply limits to what Conan can say about his old bosses at the peacock network. The Hollywood Reporter says that Conan's settlement deal contains strict rules against making "disparaging" comments about NBC or NBC Studios, Jay Leno and NBC executives Jeff Zucker , Dick Ebersol , Jeff Gaspin and Marc Graboff . Those limitations end Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Lawmakers have asked NBC to reverse its decision to air commercials for distilled alcoholic beverages, and they threatened to ban such TV ads if the network does not cooperate. The legislators on Thursday accused the network of placing profits above concerns about underage drinking and other social ills. NBC has said that it will not accept such ads featuring active professional athletes, and that for the first four months, the ads will be limited to "socially responsible" messages that include warnings against alcohol abuse.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
If the clock on your VCR still blinks 12:00, this is the summer you may want to figure out how it works. Otherwise, you have some tough decisions ahead. The major networks, in planning for their fall seasons, have done it again - not all that much to look forward to, but the good stuff's on at the same times: NBC's "Frasier" is scheduled to go head to head with ABC's "Roseanne" Tuesday nights at 9. CBS's "Picket Fences" and NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street," both critically acclaimed dramas that have struggled to find an audience, will air Friday nights at 10. And in what appears to be a network game of chicken, CBS and NBC have each scheduled promising new medical dramas set in Chicago for Thursday nights at 10. CBS's entry, "Chicago Hope," comes with the imprimatur of executive producer David E. Kelley, who already writes virtually every word of "Picket Fences" and who's credited with some of the best seasons "L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attention, ladies. Our topic today is TV sexism and the low esteem in which you're held by some NBC executives. Operating on the premise that all the guys go off to swill beer, compare tire treads and curse at the screen each October during the baseball playoffs and World Series, NBC has decided to offer a block of expensive, female- oriented "counterprogramming" this year. This week's presentations, adapted from the works of the extremely popular romance novelist Danielle Steel, are not only completely mindless, they are excruciatingly boring.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
NBC executives have really been pushing the theme of "one big happy family" for the new crew of the "Today" show. So it gave news anchor Faith Daniels pause when she and co-host Joe Garagiola were accidentally booked into the same hotel suite last week in Washington. "I mean . . . Joe and I really thought, 'This family thing has gone too far,' " Daniels said. Daniels, who with Garagiola and Katie Couric was scheduled to join the "Today" crew this morning, seems pretty good-natured about being dropped into the hot seat at NBC. The network received terrible publicity for its January exchange of Deborah Norville for veteran host Jane Pauley, and after many years as the No. 1 rated morning show, "Today" is now firmly in second place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By David Bauder, Associated Press
PASADENA, Calif. - In his forthcoming NBC comedy, Michael J. Fox will play a newscaster who had quit his job due to Parkinson's disease but returns to work in the show's first episode because a new medical regimen has helped him control many of the disease's symptoms. It mirrors the life of the former Family Ties and Spin City star, who said last year that drugs had helped minimize the physical tics of Parkinson's and had enabled him to take on more acting jobs. The yet-to-be-named sitcom is a key piece of NBC's strategy to build upon a revival that has brought the network back from many years in the ratings wilderness.
SPORTS
August 6, 2012
NBC executives were crowing this week about how well the broadcasting and live-streaming of events have been going at the Olympics. "We couldn't be more pleased with the current results on all of our platforms," Mark Lazarus, NBC Sports Group Chairman told reporters Thursday in London. He wasn't watching in my house. Let me first give NBC its due. It is stunning and ambitious what NBC is doing. Every single event of the Olympics is streamed live over the Internet. And most of the time, it works beautifully.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IF CONAN O'BRIEN wins an Emmy Sunday night - a definite possibility, says TV writer Ellen Gray - someone at host network NBC may have his finger poised near the censor button. No one's really concerned that the former "Tonight" show host will turn into Conan the Vulgarian, there are simply limits to what Conan can say about his old bosses at the peacock network. The Hollywood Reporter says that Conan's settlement deal contains strict rules against making "disparaging" comments about NBC or NBC Studios, Jay Leno and NBC executives Jeff Zucker , Dick Ebersol , Jeff Gaspin and Marc Graboff . Those limitations end Sept.
NEWS
May 22, 2005 | By Chris Satullo
Dreams died hard. In the end, though, nothing could save American Dreams, the superb television drama that tracked a Philadelphia family through the 1960s. Up to 4,000 e-mails a week from desperate fans couldn't rescue it. Nor could the plane that flew over NBC's Burbank offices with a "Save American Dreams" banner. Nor could the pleas of television critics who were appalled to think they cover a medium where Dreams could die while Joey lives. NBC confirmed last week that the show was being cancelled after three seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Lawmakers have asked NBC to reverse its decision to air commercials for distilled alcoholic beverages, and they threatened to ban such TV ads if the network does not cooperate. The legislators on Thursday accused the network of placing profits above concerns about underage drinking and other social ills. NBC has said that it will not accept such ads featuring active professional athletes, and that for the first four months, the ads will be limited to "socially responsible" messages that include warnings against alcohol abuse.
SPORTS
July 21, 1996 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In many ways, the Olympics are the ultimate TV show - an intriguing blend of competitions stretched over 17 days, interspersed with profiles of the competitors designed to bring them to life for an audience only marginally acquainted with their specialties. It's a decidedly expensive TV show - NBA paid more than $450 million for the rights to broadcast the Centennial Games from Atlanta - but apparently well worth the cost. Network research indicates that more than 200 million Americans will watch at least one segment of the Games.
SPORTS
August 25, 1995 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Seven hundred fifteen million dollars for the 2000 Summer Olympics in Australia. Five hundred fifty-five million dollars for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Total: 1.27 billion buckeroos. All in a day's work at NBC Sports. How, wondered a visitor to New York City the other day, does the idea for such a staggering deal originate? And how does Dick Ebersol, the point man for the Olympic-sized deal, keep a sense of reality as he works with all those zeroes?
LIVING
November 4, 1994 | LOS ANGELES TIMES This article contains information from Inquirer television critic Jonathan Storm
The sense of nausea and panic that used to grip NBC executives every morning when they got the ratings flashes on Jay Leno's Tonight Show is easing. Still smarting from making one of the worst blunders in TV history, NBC executives are taking heart as Leno's audience has been growing this fall. That blunder, of course, was the decision to replace Johnny Carson with Leno, and as a result send David Letterman into the arms of CBS, where he won a $42 million, three-year contract to go against Leno weeknights.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
If the clock on your VCR still blinks 12:00, this is the summer you may want to figure out how it works. Otherwise, you have some tough decisions ahead. The major networks, in planning for their fall seasons, have done it again - not all that much to look forward to, but the good stuff's on at the same times: NBC's "Frasier" is scheduled to go head to head with ABC's "Roseanne" Tuesday nights at 9. CBS's "Picket Fences" and NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Street," both critically acclaimed dramas that have struggled to find an audience, will air Friday nights at 10. And in what appears to be a network game of chicken, CBS and NBC have each scheduled promising new medical dramas set in Chicago for Thursday nights at 10. CBS's entry, "Chicago Hope," comes with the imprimatur of executive producer David E. Kelley, who already writes virtually every word of "Picket Fences" and who's credited with some of the best seasons "L.A.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
When David Letterman turned to former "Tonight" host Johnny Carson for career advice, Carson suggested that he leave NBC for CBS, according to a new book. Trying to decide between an 11th-hour offer from NBC to be host of "Tonight" and a $14 million-a-year offer from CBS to be host of a show there, Letterman asked Carson in December 1992 what he'd do if he were in the same situation. "I'd probably walk," Carson told Letterman. "I'm not telling you to do that, David. But if you're asking me what I'd do . . . I would probably walk.
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