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NEWS
August 10, 1999 | SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL / Inquirer Suburban Staff
A spicebush swallowtail drinks nectar from a butterfly bush along Main Street in Evesham Township. Many residents are using Mother Nature to draw living beauty to their lawns by planting flowers and bushes that attract butterflies.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
  The Asian street-food bandwagon has picked up some Main Line polish, as Nectar chef Patrick Feury has taken the steamed pork bun to a dangerous place: potential addiction. Feury has sourced a perfect bun, a palm-sized white cloud of fold-over pastry. But it's the pork belly inside that got me, which Feury gives the expected fusion approach, the well-trimmed meat rolled up like Italian porchetta, then basted in a dark, gingery Asian braise. Perfectly rendered, but still tender and juicy, the pork roulade is shined with hoisin, then dabbed with sriracha-spiked Kewpie Japanese mayonnaise.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
Scott Morrison, 54, who helped create some of the Main Line's most popular restaurants and more recently co-owned two popular restaurants in Wilmington, died over the weekend at his home in Newtown Square. Mr. Morrison was found in his bed Sunday morning, Feb. 14. The Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office on Monday said it had not determined the cause of death. Mr. Morrison was raising his daughters - now teenagers - after his wife's death four years ago from breast cancer.
FOOD
July 28, 2016
Makes enough filling for 16 tacos For the vegan mayonnaise: 2 tablespoons lime juice 1/2 cup unsweetened soy milk 1 cup canola oil 1 tablespoon agave nectar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper For the filling: 8 ears of corn, husks and silk removed Canola oil cooking spray 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon chili powder Lime wedges, optional 1. For the mayonnaise, use...
FOOD
September 10, 1997 | by Charles Dickson, For the Daily News
The use of honey, both as food and for medicinal purposes, is as old as recorded history. In the Bible, honey is emblematic of sweetness - the Israelites are promised a "land overflowing with milk and honey. " On a more prosaic level, the ancient Egyptians are believed to have used the versatile product in embalming. Manufactured by bees from the nectar of flowers, honey is produced throughout the United States, with Florida and California being the leading sources. In Canada, the province of Alberta is a major producer.
FOOD
August 10, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I like my tea stronger than most people do. Is it better to simply let it steep longer, or should I use more tea leaves? - B.T. Dear B.T.: Some of the components of tea will merely become more bitter as the tea steeps. For additional good flavor, let the brew only steep three to five minutes, but use a larger quantity of tea leaves. - Polly Dear Polly: For quick summer meals, I keep raw vegetables cleaned and trimmed in plastic bags in the refrigerator, along with ham or turkey from the deli, cheese and salad dressing.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Christina Fore, a perfect day is one spent in her Merchantville backyard, watching the butterflies flit by. "There's one," she cried, pointing out a cabbage white as it leisurely made its way across the yard. A short time later, a painted lady followed. Fore watched as the butterflies flew in circles around the yard, mingling with the bees and avoiding the birds. "It's very peaceful, very relaxing," she said. Fore had found "butterflying" so rewarding that she planted her own butterfly garden last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1999 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It might have been 95 degrees a few days ago, but it's really new year's in Grays Ferry. The annual Odunde (literally, "happy new year") festival on Sunday will mark the Nigerian new year, specifically of the Yoruba culture of southern and southwestern Nigeria. The Grays Ferry festival was founded in 1975 with a $100 grant. It will begin at the South Street Bridge over the Schuylkill. Participants, carrying flowers such as goldenrod and bird-of-paradise and dressed in robes and headdresses, will "go to the river" - an African tradition.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 28, 2016
Makes enough filling for 16 tacos For the vegan mayonnaise: 2 tablespoons lime juice 1/2 cup unsweetened soy milk 1 cup canola oil 1 tablespoon agave nectar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper For the filling: 8 ears of corn, husks and silk removed Canola oil cooking spray 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon chili powder Lime wedges, optional 1. For the mayonnaise, use...
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Mark Antunes drove his Tacoma pickup down a dirt road near Spring City in Chester County to the tree line at the edge of a farm field, where nine of his 100 honeybee colonies awaited his inspection. The hives looked like weather-beaten wooden filing cabinets that had seen too many winters. A few bees entered and left through narrow slots at ground level, but there was no hint of the thousands inside until Antunes pried off the roof with his hive tool - a nine-inch steel crowbar - and exposed the vast army of female worker bees, too busy at their day jobs to notice the intruder, much less sting him. He wore netting over his face but worked barehanded, using a paper-fueled smoke blower to confuse the bees.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
Scott Morrison, 54, who helped create some of the Main Line's most popular restaurants and more recently co-owned two popular restaurants in Wilmington, died over the weekend at his home in Newtown Square. Mr. Morrison was found in his bed Sunday morning, Feb. 14. The Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office on Monday said it had not determined the cause of death. Mr. Morrison was raising his daughters - now teenagers - after his wife's death four years ago from breast cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Mike Weilbacher still thinks of the time he and others planted a bed of flowers with such care and hope at Lower Merion's Rolling Hill Park. Before summer was over, the plants were ravaged. Skeletal. All but an eyesore. But it was a glorious moment. The plants were milkweed, and they had done their job, providing a banquet for the caterpillars of the beleaguered monarch butterfly. Some gardeners would be freaked out by caterpillars dripping from the milkweed, Weilbacher said. "But I was very happy.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
  The Asian street-food bandwagon has picked up some Main Line polish, as Nectar chef Patrick Feury has taken the steamed pork bun to a dangerous place: potential addiction. Feury has sourced a perfect bun, a palm-sized white cloud of fold-over pastry. But it's the pork belly inside that got me, which Feury gives the expected fusion approach, the well-trimmed meat rolled up like Italian porchetta, then basted in a dark, gingery Asian braise. Perfectly rendered, but still tender and juicy, the pork roulade is shined with hoisin, then dabbed with sriracha-spiked Kewpie Japanese mayonnaise.
NEWS
September 9, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
He is installed now at the David Rockwell-designed showpiece called Nectar, its Buddha tapestry soaring, its sushi bar hopping, a rare moment of urban chic so far out the Main Line (in Berwyn) that you can almost hear the buggy wheels grinding in Lancaster County. It's an odd amalgam that chef-owner Patrick Feury, 46, presides over - the striking un-rural palette, the meticulous Asian-fusion plating, the bounty of some of the richest farm country on the Eastern seaboard. But you get the impression that not only is he comfortable - this chef who started out washing pots at 15 at a pork butcher's near his North Jersey home - but also that maybe he planned it this way, or would have if he could have.
NEWS
May 29, 2007 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day began muggy and overcast. By midday, raindrops sprinkled and showers threatened. But the sun asserted itself in the afternoon, a gentle breeze alleviated the humidity, and the 110th edition of the Devon Horse Show and Country Fair was just what it should be: pleasant and fair. Along the midway, people shopped for hats and needlepoint, antique jewelry and fancy tack. They ate tea sandwiches and fudge, sucked on the traditional lemon sticks, rode the Ferris wheel and merry-go-round.
FOOD
February 23, 2006 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's talk coffee. Not Starbucks, not Dunkin Donuts, not even your local Wawa coffee. They're fine. They're always there for us. They keep us going. But what about that transcending cup of joe, the one that carries in its waft a sense of place? Coffee with a past. Coffee that tells a story on the tongue. It may be coffee that makes you wait but then rewards and makes you want to linger. In multiculture-rich Philadelphia, there are lots of places you can find The Other Coffee.
FOOD
July 14, 2005 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
A broiling July sun is making your brain feel like the inside of a rotisserie. Your tongue is a slab of sandpaper, your arms lathered in sweat. It's another Philly summer, and intellectually you know that your best friend is H2O. Yet there's the siren call of summer drinks offering a shimmering mirage of relief and refreshment. Sure, there are the old reliables: gin and tonic, pina colada, rum and Coke, ice-cold beer. But thanks to the growth of flavored vodkas and rums, the surge in younger drinkers eager to try new libations, and creative bartenders - "bar chefs" in the nouveau argot - we also have a colorful array of exotic choices.
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