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NEWS
August 30, 2012
Once upon a time, a man walked on the moon. He climbed down the ladder onto lunar soil, the first human being ever to do so. "That's one small step for [a] man," he famously said, "one giant leap for mankind. " It was one of history's greatest feats, and we had done it, we Americans. That man died Saturday of complications from a cardiovascular procedure. Neil Armstrong, a Korean War fighter pilot from small-town Ohio, was 82. He never spoke much about what he had done, shied away from publicity, never even wrote a memoir.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Dan Sewell, Associated Press
CINCINNATI - Neil Armstrong was a humble hero who saw himself as a team player and never capitalized on his celebrity as the first man to walk on the moon, mourners said Friday outside a private service attended by fellow space pioneers, including his two crewmates on the historic Apollo 11 mission. Hundreds of people attended a closed service for Armstrong Friday at a private club in suburban Cincinnati. A national memorial service has been scheduled for Sept. 12 in Washington, although no other details have been released on the service or burial plans for Armstrong.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jersey Shore star Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi gave birth to her first child, a boy, Sunday. The reality star and her fiance, Jionni LaValle , welcomed 6-pound, 5-ounce Lorenzo Dominic LaValle just before 3 a.m. at St. Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, N.J. "The world just got another Guido!!!," a Polizzi rep told MTV. "Nicole, Jionni & Enzo are doing great!" MTV congratulated Polizzi and LaValle and looked toward the newborn's possible appearance on Jersey Shore . "We couldn't be happier for Nicole and Jionni on the healthy delivery of their baby boy!"
NEWS
September 3, 2012
Melissa Farkouh is a board member of the Friends of the Medal of Honor Grove, and director of institutional advancement at the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, home of the grove Sometimes, stories of heroism and hope begin with something as simple as a one-inch sugar packet. And memories of one such packet were stirred last weekend, with the death of Neil Armstrong, 82, commander of Apollo 11 and the first man to walk on the moon. As Armstrong's place in history was being discussed, so many stories began with people talking about where they were July 20, 1969, watching as Armstrong took that "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.
NEWS
December 8, 2003
THE BUSH White House can't seem to make up its mind: Are we going to the moon or not? Early last week administration officials started leaking the idea that President Bush planned to announce a major space initiative, perhaps to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Wright brothers' historic flight in Kitty Hawk, N.C. The new goal: a return trip to the moon. Then later, White House spokesman Scott McClellan backpedaled, saying there was no plans for any immediate announcement.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago next month, astronaut Michael Collins piloted a spaceship around the moon as crewmates Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin took the first tenative steps on the surface. Collins, now 57, discusses the moon expedition, and others in which he took part, on the Larry King show at 11 tonight on WIP (AM/610). Collins, a retired Air Force major general who lives in Washington, also will talk about the resumption of the space shuttle missions, scheduled for September. He believes NASA moved too slowly in recovering from the 1986 Challenger disaster in which seven astronauts died.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On a cold-snap Saturday night in a crowded, airtight, windowless Boot & Saddle, Allo Darlin' brought some breeze and brightness. They couldn't help it. With three albums (including the just-released We Come From the Same Place ), the Anglo Australian quartet has experience at crafting sweetly sunny, smart pop with innocent yet contemplative lyrics whose hard jangle and flittering flights of funky fancy are reminiscent of Scotland's Orange Juice. But this band's chiming, charming vocals and effervescent, experiential lyrics come not from a wonky Scot but from Australian singer/ukulele player Elizabeth Morris, a fresh-faced, pixie-haired lass whose light, sharp alto is as open as her expression of glee - often in the lively embrace of sad-eyed bewilderment.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE look at the moon and think, isn't that pretty. Louis Diodoro looked at the moon and said, "Let's go there!" Louis was an aeronautical engineer with General Electric for nearly 30 years, working on many key aspects of America's space exploration. His department designed and built the nose cones for the rockets that, in 1961, first sent a chimp into space, and then in July 1969 - the culmination of an aeronautical engineer's dream- sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in the Apollo 11 program.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
Some inventions simply extend human powers that already exist - but powered flight gave us something we?d never had before. Flight gave us a place in the sky. Near the 100th anniversary of powered flight, an astronaut, a military transport pilot, and a business traveler tell us how flight has changed world history - and their personal histories. Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of humanly powered flight. From there, it was less than seven decades to the moon: On July 20, 1969, the landing module of Apollo 11, the Eagle, touched down.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Twenty years ago tonight, as Neil Armstrong made the first human footprint on the soft, chalky surface of the moon 240,000 miles away, Don Morway sat in his Bucks County home, transfixed by grainy TV images, reflecting on his role in Armstrong's "giant leap for mankind. " "I felt we'd entered a whole new era for humankind," Morway recalls. "Forever changed the philosophy of man. It was the reason we were all involved in the space program. " Morway played a key role in preparing Armstrong for his historic footstep - and in the development of the American space program - as centrifuge director at the Johnsville Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, Bucks County.
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NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE look at the moon and think, isn't that pretty. Louis Diodoro looked at the moon and said, "Let's go there!" Louis was an aeronautical engineer with General Electric for nearly 30 years, working on many key aspects of America's space exploration. His department designed and built the nose cones for the rockets that, in 1961, first sent a chimp into space, and then in July 1969 - the culmination of an aeronautical engineer's dream- sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in the Apollo 11 program.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On a cold-snap Saturday night in a crowded, airtight, windowless Boot & Saddle, Allo Darlin' brought some breeze and brightness. They couldn't help it. With three albums (including the just-released We Come From the Same Place ), the Anglo Australian quartet has experience at crafting sweetly sunny, smart pop with innocent yet contemplative lyrics whose hard jangle and flittering flights of funky fancy are reminiscent of Scotland's Orange Juice. But this band's chiming, charming vocals and effervescent, experiential lyrics come not from a wonky Scot but from Australian singer/ukulele player Elizabeth Morris, a fresh-faced, pixie-haired lass whose light, sharp alto is as open as her expression of glee - often in the lively embrace of sad-eyed bewilderment.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Our losses remind us of all we've had, all the wonderful people who have moved, are moving, and will move among us. So here's a review of our human blessings, lives completed in 2012, lives that will stay with us for thankful years to come. We can't mention all - such are the riches. A local moment. This town and state lost huge names that cast much light. Longtime Penn State football coach Joe Paterno , 85, passed in the midst of scandal. Dick Clark , 82, host of American Bandstand , will see the ball descend this year - but a long way off from Times Square.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
By David Rothkopf The lodge at Camp Skoglund was an A-frame, red with white trim. It was the center of activity at the boys' camp, and on the night of July 20, 1969, it was unusually quiet. On most nights, the counselors would play music. Cream was popular that summer, and Iron Butterfly. Many of us would tap into our snack accounts to buy orange sodas and chips, and play games or just goof around. But on this night, everyone sat on the floor in a semicircle as a counselors fiddled with the rabbit-ear antenna on a black-and-white television as we squinted to discern Walter Cronkite's familiar face in the static.
NEWS
September 3, 2012
Melissa Farkouh is a board member of the Friends of the Medal of Honor Grove, and director of institutional advancement at the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, home of the grove Sometimes, stories of heroism and hope begin with something as simple as a one-inch sugar packet. And memories of one such packet were stirred last weekend, with the death of Neil Armstrong, 82, commander of Apollo 11 and the first man to walk on the moon. As Armstrong's place in history was being discussed, so many stories began with people talking about where they were July 20, 1969, watching as Armstrong took that "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Dan Sewell, Associated Press
CINCINNATI - Neil Armstrong was a humble hero who saw himself as a team player and never capitalized on his celebrity as the first man to walk on the moon, mourners said Friday outside a private service attended by fellow space pioneers, including his two crewmates on the historic Apollo 11 mission. Hundreds of people attended a closed service for Armstrong Friday at a private club in suburban Cincinnati. A national memorial service has been scheduled for Sept. 12 in Washington, although no other details have been released on the service or burial plans for Armstrong.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Once upon a time, a man walked on the moon. He climbed down the ladder onto lunar soil, the first human being ever to do so. "That's one small step for [a] man," he famously said, "one giant leap for mankind. " It was one of history's greatest feats, and we had done it, we Americans. That man died Saturday of complications from a cardiovascular procedure. Neil Armstrong, a Korean War fighter pilot from small-town Ohio, was 82. He never spoke much about what he had done, shied away from publicity, never even wrote a memoir.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jersey Shore star Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi gave birth to her first child, a boy, Sunday. The reality star and her fiance, Jionni LaValle , welcomed 6-pound, 5-ounce Lorenzo Dominic LaValle just before 3 a.m. at St. Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, N.J. "The world just got another Guido!!!," a Polizzi rep told MTV. "Nicole, Jionni & Enzo are doing great!" MTV congratulated Polizzi and LaValle and looked toward the newborn's possible appearance on Jersey Shore . "We couldn't be happier for Nicole and Jionni on the healthy delivery of their baby boy!"
NEWS
July 20, 2009 | By JON CAROULIS
THIS MIGHT BE a way to stimulate the economy and the nation, too: Let's go back into space. Forty years ago today, Neil Armstrong became the first human to step onto a celestial body other than Earth. It was an expensive trip - some estimates put the cost of reaching the moon at $24 billion ($151 billion in today's dollars). What did the U.S. accomplish by this feat? First, we beat the Soviets. Second, we met President Kennedy's goal of landing a man on the moon before 1970.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
Some inventions simply extend human powers that already exist - but powered flight gave us something we?d never had before. Flight gave us a place in the sky. Near the 100th anniversary of powered flight, an astronaut, a military transport pilot, and a business traveler tell us how flight has changed world history - and their personal histories. Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of humanly powered flight. From there, it was less than seven decades to the moon: On July 20, 1969, the landing module of Apollo 11, the Eagle, touched down.
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