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NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
Pvt. Eugene Morris Jerome (Matthew Broderick), a New York kid in boot camp in the deep South in 1943, wants to be a writer. So every day he files his thoughts in a notebook, then stows the book in his foot locker. One night, a platoon mate takes out the notebook and makes Eugene's private thoughts public. One of the men, he reads aloud, is "an animal," but probably the best soldier of the bunch; one is a good guy, but somehow untrustworthy; one, Eugene suspects, is homosexual. Eugene breaks in on this dramatic recitation, and responds to his outraged buddies that he doesn't really think those things about them.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Neil Simon's I Ought to Be in Pictures will be staged tomorrow through Feb. 18 by The Marple-Newtown Players Community Theater at the Robert C. Gauntlett Center in Newtown Square. This comedy tells the story of Herb Tucker, a writer reunited with his teenage daughter after a separation of 13 years. Performances are at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Admission is $7.50 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and children. Group rates are available. The Gauntlett Center is at West Chester Pike and Media Line Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
After 29 Broadway productions in 34 years, Neil Simon has taken up residence Off Broadway. His motives are purely economic: Except under exceptional circumstances, it's no longer possible for a nonmusical without major stars to pay Broadway's stifling production costs and turn a profit. But you might be forgiven for thinking that London Suite, which opened last night at the Union Square Theatre, has been tucked away on East 17th Street for reasons of anonymity. In other words, this new anthology will do Simon's reputation no favors.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In reviews of his current Broadway hit Broadway Bound, Neil Simon recently found himself chastised by critics for writing a very good play instead of a great one. One of the charges against him is that, as he moves into more sobering and semi-autobiographical territory, he is still loath to discard the crutch of comedy. This argument has always been with Simon, but it began to heat up when he wrote Brighton Beach Memoirs - the first play in the trilogy completed by Biloxi Blues and Broadway Bound.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, the Washington Post, the New York Times, USA Today and William H. Sokolic
Neil Simon had an incredible string of theatrical successes come to an end with Thursday's announcement that his newest play, Jake's Women, would close out of town and would not play Broadway. The piece, about a man taking stock by having imaginary conversations with the women in his life, closes April 15 at San Diego's Old Globe Theater. "I couldn't make a clear decision on what to fix and what not to fix," said Simon, who has brought 24 plays to Broadway in the last 30 years. "I think that going to New York with a show that's not going to make it would have been wrong . . . especially at the prices they charge today.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A production of a Neil Simon play that does a good job with the playwright's humor should send a theatergoer away satisfied. With Broadway Bound, though, funny is not enough. The theatergoer expects dramatic impact as well, and that is what's lacking in the production at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts. Broadway Bound is the last of Simon's trilogy of plays loosely based on his own youth. Brighton Beach Memoirs deals with the teenage years of aspiring writer Eugene Jerome; Biloxi Blues follows him into the Army.
NEWS
October 29, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Eugene Jerome, who wants to write comedy, tells us early in Broadway Bound that it would be simpler just to sell tickets to his family's living room in Brighton Beach. And that is precisely the impression that Neil Simon gives us in this third and by far best play in his autobiographical trilogy. We get the sense of life being helplessly and tragically funnier than anything a writer could invent. The national company, headed by Carole Shelley in a surprisingly authoritative performance, opened a four-week run last night at the Forrest Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Biloxi Blues is the only one of Neil Simon's semiautobiographical trilogy of plays, about a writer's formative years, to win a Tony Award for best play. Of the three, it is the least deserving of the award. Both Brighton Beach Memoirs and Broadway Bound, the other works about writer-to-be Eugene Jerome, are more dramatically effective, more emotionally satisfying pieces of theater. But, of course, Biloxi Blues wasn't competing against its own companion plays for the 1984 Tony, and the reasons it outscored the plays with which it was competing are obvious in the fine production the play is receiving at Hedgerow Theatre.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Broadway Bound, a Neil Simon comedy that is a sequel to Brighton Beach Memoirs, opens at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Colonial Playhouse in Aldan. The story tells of two brothers trying to become television writers. The show will be performed at 8 p.m. Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $8 for evening performances and $7 for the matinee. The theater also is holding an audition at 7:30 p.m. Monday for the show Sabrina Fair. The performances are scheduled from April 15 to 30. For information, call the director, Dick Croft, at 626-8799.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
Linda Lavin and Jonathan Silverman in "Broadway Bound," a new comedy by Neil Simon. Directed by Gene Saks, set by David Mitchell, costumes by Joseph G. Aulisi, lighting by Tharon Musser, sound by Tom Morse. Presented by Emanuel Azenberg at the Broadhurst Theatre, 44th St. west of Broadway, New York. One quickly notices that Neil Simon once again has muted the laugh track for this, the third and presumably last leg of his semi-autobiographical trilogy centering upon the character of Eugene Morris Jerome, the quick- witted young diarist of "Brighton Beach Memoirs" and "Biloxi Blues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Like the army itself, the best war stories tell ensemble-driven tales ( Band of Brothers , Saving Private Ryan ) of warriors worn down by conflict and overcoming (or not) their trials through a unified effort. People's Light and Theatre's superb production of Neil Simon's Biloxi Blues adheres to this tradition, with director Samantha Bellomo finding an endearing balance of warmth and humor centered on the richly textured characterizations of her outstanding ensemble cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It's kind of a marvel to realize that Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers , now in a fine revival at Bristol Riverside Theatre, premiered in 1990. Though it won the 1991 Pulitzer Prize and swept the Tonys, it was, by then, something of an anachronism: both a new Simon play and a sentimental look back at a Jewish immigrant family during World War II. But clearly, it struck a nerve. This production, directed by Keith Baker, does the same, calling to mind the Kurnitz family's international legacy: new waves of refugees who came to America, settled into an ethnic enclave, moved into an apartment above their store, and raised the next generation with one foot here and another resting uneasily in the Old World.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Neil Simon's Chapter Two , a 1976 Broadway hit and tribute to the romantic fortitude of the playwright's second wife, Marsha Mason, finds itself at the Bucks County Playhouse for yet another chapter. The twist this time is that Mason directs the story of her own marriage and the role that, for its film adaptation costarring James Caan, won her an Academy Award nomination. The pair met within a year of Simon's first wife's death from cancer, while Mason was licking her wounds from a divorce; they wed after a courtship of three weeks.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
LET'S FACE it: To this point, 2014 hasn't exactly been what you'd call a laugh riot here in the old Del Val. Unless, of course, you have the kind of twisted sense of humor that would find hilarity in the horrendous weather, 76ers' losing streak and the latest political and police scandals we've endured since New Year's. So, it is with gratitude and a sense of relief that I can point you to a pair of ensemble-propelled chuckle-fests currently playing in the region. These two shows are not necessarily for the same audience.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I could easily dismiss Laughter on the 23rd Floor as harmless nostalgia. Neil Simon's 1993 play takes place in 1953, when he and "the finest writing staff in the history of TV" produced the weekly sketches for Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows . Simon's semiautobiographical piece, now at Bristol Riverside Theatre, disguises or blends the main players: He renames himself Lucas Brickman (Jason Silverman), Caesar becomes Max Prince (David Edwards), and Mel Brooks turns up as Ira Stone (Ben Lloyd)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In the first vignette of Act II Playhouse's Hotel Suite , Diana Nichols (Karen Peakes) scoffs at her own Oscar nomination. She has done Pinter, Beckett, but what finally hit was this "silly comedy. " Her husband Sidney (Leonard C. Haas) responds, "They don't go for quality, love, they go by gross. " If its cast weren't so amiable, the same could be said for Hotel Suite , a "best of" collection that cherry-picks from Neil Simon's other successful Suites ( Plaza , California , London )
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Luxurious rehearsal was not in the cards for the cast of Charles Busch's The Tale of the Allergist's Wife two weeks before its Thursday opening at Bucks County Playhouse. As Manhattan studio time to prepare the densely comic play dwindled, the cast was spending long days feeling its way when the script's warped magic unexpectedly took hold. "That's obnoxious and crazy! In a really good way," Boyd Gaines, who is making his directorial debut, said at that turning point.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Richard Griffiths, 65, one of the great British stage actors of his generation, a heavy man with a light touch, whether in Shakespeare or Neil Simon, died Thursday at University Hospital in Coventry, central England, from complications following heart surgery, said his agent, Simon Beresford. Mr. Griffiths appeared in dozens of movies and TV shows, but for millions of movie fans, he will always be grumpy Uncle Vernon, the least magical of characters in the fantastical Harry Potter movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2011
Theater Cabaret Stage Left Productions performs the musical story of love in a time of tribulation. Closes 8/27. Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton, NJ; 609-704-5012. www.stageleftco.com . $20-$30. Cape May Stage: Steel Magnolias Six women share gossip & cope with life's ups & downs at a small-town hair salon. Closes 9/10. Robert Shackleton Playhouse, Bank & Lafayette Sts., Cape May; Box Office: 609-884-1341. $35-$50; $30-$50 seniors; $12.50-$50 students. I Do!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In Montgomery Theater's production of The Prisoner of Second Avenue , Tony Braithwaite is mad as hell and he's not gonna take it anymore. On the heels of another heated role - Marc, in Yasmina Reza's Art , at Act II Playhouse - Braithwaite turns up the mania in this dark-edged Neil Simon nugget from the early 1970s, later produced as a film starring Jack Lemmon and Anne Bancroft. Funny thing about the early 1970s: They look a whole lot like the early 2010s. Sure, Manhattan might be cleaner and safer these days, but America's economic troubles and job prospects appear to have come full circle.
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