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Neiman Marcus

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BUSINESS
September 21, 1988 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Susan Warner contributed to this article
Plans for a major regional shopping mall that would be anchored by a Neiman Marcus specialty department store were announced yesterday for Plymouth Meeting by Hansen Properties of Horsham and Melvin Simon & Associates, the largest mall manager in the United States. The proposed mall is part of an ambitious $425 million development called the Metroplex at Plymouth Meeting, which would include a 550-room hotel and two 16-story office towers. Its opening is scheduled for September 1990, the anticipated completion date for the Blue Route (Interstate 476)
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | By Gary Thompson and Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writers
A suburban real estate company today said it plans to build a $425 million commercial development of office towers, hotel rooms and upscale stores - including Neiman-Marcus - on land adjacent to the interchange of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and the Blue Route. The proposed development, which has yet to be approved by state or local governmental agencies, is another clear sign that the Blue Route is having a profound impact on the way the Philadelphia metropolitan region is growing.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday, the day before its grand opening, there was something unusual about the Neiman Marcus store in King of Prussia. Sure, the $1,890 navy Armani suit was hung properly and the Chanel boutique was all set up, but there was something missing in the shoe department: the shoes. They were gone to make space for a stage for the musical group The Shirelles and a dance floor for the very well dressed 1,000 people attending the charity gala to benefit the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia last night.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1992 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Franklin Mills, the Northeast Philadelphia outlet center, will add a Neiman Marcus store - the first in the Philadelphia area - and a high-tech entertainment complex, mall officials disclosed yesterday. The new tenants will substantially complete the $300 million mall, which has been struggling to land and retain major tenants since it opened in 1989. "We know what we need to do to finish the project and make it a great one. We're well on the way to doing that," said Kent Digby, senior vice president of management for Western Development Inc., Franklin Mills' Washington developer.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1996 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neiman Marcus on Friday trotted out the mussels stuffed with black-olive salsa and cumin-rubbed pork kabobs Friday. Nordstrom will return fire Wednesday with papaya-grilled salmon, caviar, carmelized tuna with a ginger glaze, and raisin-peach tartlets. It's the battle of the galas. Back-to-back, black-tie charity soirees are keeping the society set swirling as Philadelphia's two newest department-store retailers pull out all stops to make a splash for their opening week at King of Prussia mall.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1994 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No one had to wear a hard hat or worry about scuffed shoes at this upscale construction event. Instead, a harpist dressed in green velvet played Pachelbel's Canon, tuxedoed waiters poured juice into goblets, and guests sampled quiche. Neiman Marcus held the event yesterday at The Plaza at King of Prussia for its first store in Pennsylvania, a 138,000-square-foot, three-story site that will sell designer clothes, furs, jewelry and feature a cafe. It wasn't a groundbreaking because the ground was already broken.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two fleeing suspects abandoned their car on the jammed Schuylkill Expressway yesterday afternoon, ran across lanes of oncoming traffic, and jumped into the chilly waters of the Schuylkill. Three state troopers, believing they were chasing robbers who had fired a gun in the Neiman Marcus store at the King of Prussia mall, jumped in after them. They all waded across the river in chest-deep 42-degree water. There, the action sequence out of The Fugitive ended. More troopers were waiting on the other side, above the Belmont Avenue interchange, and the two men were quickly arrested.
LIVING
February 21, 1996 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How many stores have an art curator on the payroll? Neiman Marcus does. You might say it's raising shopping to the level of art. When the new store opens at King of Prussia on Saturday, customers will find a little culture among the designer duds - Warhols and Wegmans hanging out with the Versaces and Valentinos. The new Neiman Marcus, like every other store in the chain, will have its own permanent art collection. Showcased at the mall entrances, displayed on corridor walls - in fact, in prime spots all over the store - will be sculptures, paintings, ethnic textiles, works on paper, 165 pieces of fine art in all, each with a plaque identifying the artist and the title of the work.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Usually, they have to go in through the service entrance. Instead of walking past the 75-foot clock and under the grand white canopy into the world of Chanel and Armani, Neiman Marcus workers slip through a side door into a room lined with lockers and heating ducts before emerging, expensively dressed and perfectly coiffed, to help customers. But for just one night, they had the whole place to themselves. And they did something they do well. They shopped. Sales clerks and designers, consultants and managers - even the boss, Bill Brobston - ransacked the spanking new store at the King of Prussia Plaza during a three-hour shopping spree Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1996 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, a lady carrying a brown paper bag and wearing a housedress, sneakers and a nondescript coat wandered into Neiman Marcus, the legendary Dallas store with a reputation for outrageous luxury. And once upon a time, there was a young man - a salesman, whose daddy (Herbert Marcus) and auntie (Carrie Neiman) founded the company in 1907. The salesman didn't have much to do when the lady in the housedress walked in, so he decided to show her some of the original Rembrandt etchings hanging on the wall.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014
WHEN THIEVES hack a luxury retailer like Neiman Marcus, you know the apocalypse has begun. I mean, security breaches only happen at retailers where struggling working stiffs and the shrinking middle class shop, right? But after the luxury merchant, which operates more than 79 upscale and clearance stores (including three in the Philly area) confirmed that thieves stole some of its customers' payment-card information and made unauthorized charges over the holiday season, it appears that even the flush shoppers are no longer immune from personal-data theft.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WE KNOW that most of you haven't started shopping for Tattle's holiday gift yet - that means you, Bill O'Reilly - but in case you need some hints, the 87th edition of the Neiman Marcus Christmas Book is offering, for $1.85 million, a personalized 25-carat diamond ring with a trip to Africa so we can see where the diamond came from. If it's a blood diamond, the trip is unfortunately one-way. More to Tattle's liking: an outdoor entertainment system replete with a 201-inch television that rises out of the ground.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
The towering black wall has been impossible to miss. Rising from shiny, white floor tiles at the East Coast's largest shopping mall, it has projected a cloak of mystery all the more stark for being a short walk from Louis Vuitton, Hermes, and Neiman Marcus - stores forbidding for their prices, if not their facades. For months, the black monolith has broadcast nothing to shoppers at the Plaza at King of Prussia. Not even the benign nugget of history that behind it once hummed a now-defunct John Wanamaker department store.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Wurtz scratched his head in awe when he saw the rows of designer clothes with red "30 percent off" signs in the Neiman Marcus at the Plaza at King of Prussia Mall last week. "I've walked through here before, but I've never seen sales racks in here of this magnitude," said the 49-year-old hospitality management executive from Lafayette Hill, as he plucked a Chloe women's jacket for his wife for $405, down from $675, with an additional 30 percent off. But Neiman Marcus wasn't alone in offering savings of up to 70 percent.
NEWS
May 3, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kmart bought Sears. Macy's and Strawbridge's are getting together. Toys R Us is being bought out. Now, add luxury retailer Neiman Marcus to the growing list of big-name stores caught up in a wave of multibillion-dollar mergers and acquisitions that could change the nation's retail landscape. Two private equity firms, Texas Pacific Group and Warburg Pincus L.L.C., said yesterday that they would buy Dallas-based Neiman Marcus Group Inc. for $5.1 billion. The company operates 35 Neiman Marcus stores, including one at the King of Prussia mall, and 13 Last Call clearance outlets, including one at Franklin Mills.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The coming holiday shopping season is shaping up to be the best in years. Consumers feel good, analysts say. And they've got money to spend. In addition, buying on the Internet, after a kind of trial run last year, will reach new peaks this season, becoming a major force in the marketplace. "It's the end of the century, and everyone is excited about the new one," said business analyst Albert Sindlinger of Wallingford, Delaware County. "People have as much money now as they've had since 1972.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two fleeing suspects abandoned their car on the jammed Schuylkill Expressway yesterday afternoon, ran across lanes of oncoming traffic, and jumped into the chilly waters of the Schuylkill. Three state troopers, believing they were chasing robbers who had fired a gun in the Neiman Marcus store at the King of Prussia mall, jumped in after them. They all waded across the river in chest-deep 42-degree water. There, the action sequence out of The Fugitive ended. More troopers were waiting on the other side, above the Belmont Avenue interchange, and the two men were quickly arrested.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | Los Angeles Daily News
A card and a hug and maybe breakfast in bed is always appreciated. But a token of your affection and respect will be a constant reminder of what a great kid you are - as well as something to show friends and co-workers. Whatever your budget - small, medium or big bucks - here's a shopping list tailored just for you: Love on a shoestring Pink-and-green floral scarf, $6.99, Target. Victoria's Secret Cologne Blossoms (filled with pear scent), $12.50. Porcelain teacups filled with bath products, $22, Bath & Body Works.
LIVING
May 5, 1997 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Oscar de la Renta was ensconced in an executive's office at Neiman Marcus, dining on fresh fruit while talking of his recent coup: Hillary Rodham Clinton's choosing him to create her much-lauded inaugural wardrobe. "When we got together, I asked her what do you want to look like for that night, because just like when you are dressing a bride, she must have very fixed ideas of what she wants to look like," he said. "And you know what she said to me, she said she would love to walk in the ballroom and have the President go, 'Wow,' " he confided.
LIVING
September 13, 1996 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The plates may be flat or ruffled, or look like fish. Bowls may be symmetrical. Or maybe not. Teacups and teapots may be checked or striped, or feature dots or wavy lines or flowers. Or all of the above. It's MacKenzie-Childs majolica ware, and there's nothing else quite like it. Just ask Patricia Decker Patterson of Haddonfield. "I love it!" Patterson says with an enthusiasm not often associated with dinnerware. "I love the uniqueness - it's all handmade. It's very loose, nothing rigid about it. . . . They're so imaginative.
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