CollectionsNeo Soul
IN THE NEWS

Neo Soul

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 24, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Everyone treats "neo-soul" like a dirty word. Shame, that. Sure, the genre had funny hats and too many Fender Rhodes piano interludes (I'm looking at you, Jamiroquai). But the Drambuie-soaked ambience of R&B's simmering heat, hip-hop's rhythmic cool, jazz's gymnastic breeziness and their combined attitudes made the world safe for geniuses of modern soul such as Raphael Saadiq, Cee-Lo Green and Maxwell. Maxwell is the 35-year-old crooner/composer who between 1996 and 2001 released three cinematic classics of neo-soul, then dropped out for a while after that.
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Philly's Jaguar Wright is soul's forgotten woman. This most emotional, cocksure of local MCs-turned-vocalists, who made her mark before the start of neo-soul, had it down cold. She still does, as her gig Wednesday night at World Cafe Live proved. In 1999, Wright's voice had the sass of Patti LaBelle, the sex of Millie Jackson, and the street of Mary J. Blige, with a hip-hop-inspired groove below it. Her lyrical aplomb was caustic, naughty, and tender - easily making her a star of the Black Lily scene, along with Jill Scott.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Natalie Stewart, wordsmith of the neo-soul/hip-hop duo Floetry, describes the tape as a bit of whimsical braggadocio. A little more than two years ago, as she and musical collaborator Marsha Ambrosius prepared to leave London for what they hoped would be the start of their Stateside music careers, Stewart made her older brother a birthday tape. "It was the first birthday I [would be] away from him," she said recently, sitting in the Philadelphia office of Floetry's management, enjoying a rare two-day tour break in the city the two now call home.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Ever since her mid-'90s collaborations (and romantic involvement) with D'Angelo, Angie Stone has been marked as a member of the nostalgic "neo-soul" movement. The critical and commercial success of the frank, worldly Mahogany Soul, her second release, has even led some to dub Stone, 36, the "Queen of Neo-Soul. " Yet Stone doesn't fit the mold of her fellow travelers, many of whom are relatively young and desperately naive. At the dawn of the neo-soul era, Stone had been making music professionally for more than a decade, first with Sequence, an all-female rap trio signed to the influential Sugar Hill label, and then as a member of the vocal group Vertical Hold.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
VIVIAN GREEN wants fans to know: The vocal powerhouse who lit the joint on fire with kiss-offs like "Gotta Go, Gotta Leave (Tired)," "Mad" and "Selfish" is no longer angry and not into male-bashing anymore. And the East Oak Lane native (now a Brewerytown resident) also has been listening and responding to your stylistic critiques with her new album, "The Green Room," out Tuesday on the eOne imprint. The music should likewise play nicely at the Keswick come Sunday, when Green and her quartet share a bill with the seasoned progressive soul band Mint Condition.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
Before playing a single note, before even sitting down at the keyboards at World Cafe Live on Thursday night, Robert Glasper's first order of business was to ask for the stage lights to be dimmed. "We like it kind of sexy," he insisted. Vibe and atmosphere are all-important to the Robert Glasper Experiment. The quartet, which serves as the electric complement to Glasper's slightly more traditional acoustic trio, exists as a permanent jam session, tackling every tune with a sprawling, exploratory looseness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Thankfully, the promised inflatable rat courtesy of Philadelphia's IATSE Local 8 stagehands' union didn't show up at Saturday night's Erykah Badu show at the Electric Factory. Last week, Local 8 claimed on its Facebook page that Electric Factory's stagehands were underpaid, and that neither audience members nor Badu should cross their line. Yet there was no trouble at the Factory (and no indication whether the issue was resolved); only a sold-out crowd roused by the good vibrations of a woman who, in 1997, released two albums - Baduizm, Live - that midwifed the then-burgeoning new music brand of neo-soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
During the two years she spent recording her debut, Acoustic Soul, India.Arie heard Motown president Kedar Massenburg offer the same advice over and over. The tireless producer and executive, who discovered D'Angelo and Erykah Badu and literally holds a trademark on the term neo-classic soul, had no quibble with the songs she was writing for acoustic guitar, songs that have led to a surprising seven Grammy bids for an artist with a shade-above-cult following. And he had nothing but encouragement for her lyrics - understated sermons on strength, courage and wisdom.
NEWS
November 2, 2001 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Boz Scaggs, whose quintessentially '70s smash Silk Degrees came out during the Bicentennial, is what is euphemistically referred to as a "heritage artist. " But, as he proved Wednesday at the Keswick, the 57-year-old Bay Area singer is much more interested in pushing new material that, in many cases, makes the case for his timelessness. While Scaggs performed the old hits, including a rousing "Lido Shuffle" and a jazzy romp through "Lowdown," the emphasis was on his recently released Dig. The newer material, though clearly from a different time and place, retained some of the lavishness and casual precision of Scaggs' classics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
NATURE OR NURTURE? It' a fair question to put to Rhonda Ross - only love child of supremely gifted song stylist Diana Ross and Motown Records founder Berry Gordy - as Rhonda preps for her area club debut tomorrow. The venue? The aptly named, genre-crossing Rrazz Room cabaret in New Hope. Yes, Rhonda Ross has a look that identifies her as a mix of her parents. (Raised as a Silberstein, Rhonda didn't know Gordy was her biological dad until age 13.) Some resemblances also are noted in her singing voice, especially the way Rhonda modulates final notes - with a pitchy waver that's part of the Diana Ross signature.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Thankfully, the promised inflatable rat courtesy of Philadelphia's IATSE Local 8 stagehands' union didn't show up at Saturday night's Erykah Badu show at the Electric Factory. Last week, Local 8 claimed on its Facebook page that Electric Factory's stagehands were underpaid, and that neither audience members nor Badu should cross their line. Yet there was no trouble at the Factory (and no indication whether the issue was resolved); only a sold-out crowd roused by the good vibrations of a woman who, in 1997, released two albums - Baduizm, Live - that midwifed the then-burgeoning new music brand of neo-soul.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
VIVIAN GREEN wants fans to know: The vocal powerhouse who lit the joint on fire with kiss-offs like "Gotta Go, Gotta Leave (Tired)," "Mad" and "Selfish" is no longer angry and not into male-bashing anymore. And the East Oak Lane native (now a Brewerytown resident) also has been listening and responding to your stylistic critiques with her new album, "The Green Room," out Tuesday on the eOne imprint. The music should likewise play nicely at the Keswick come Sunday, when Green and her quartet share a bill with the seasoned progressive soul band Mint Condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
THE FIRST NIGHT Mike Dennis went to the Black Lily performing-arts series at the Five Spot, he saw a 13-year-old girl take the stage, start her set with a snippet of a gospel song and, with the crowd behind her, proceed to blow the roof off the now-defunct Old City club. Her name was Jazmine Sullivan, and she would later have a No. 1 hit with "Need U Bad. " Dennis and his partner, Daryl Debrest, continued to chronicle Black Lily, a weekly performance series that ran from 2000 to 2005 and was geared toward letting women have the mic. Black Lily flourished at a time when the music industry turned its eye to Philly to find the next big thing in neo-soul, a genre that gave rise to Jill Scott, Lady Alma and Jaguar Wright.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Before playing a single note, before even sitting down at the keyboards at World Cafe Live on Thursday night, Robert Glasper's first order of business was to ask for the stage lights to be dimmed. "We like it kind of sexy," he insisted. Vibe and atmosphere are all-important to the Robert Glasper Experiment. The quartet, which serves as the electric complement to Glasper's slightly more traditional acoustic trio, exists as a permanent jam session, tackling every tune with a sprawling, exploratory looseness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
JILL SCOTT'S former students - creatively awakened to "Macbeth" by her notion of singing Willie the Shake to doo-wop tunes - might not agree. But the rest of the world owes a big thanks to the grumpy principal at Dobbins High School who so dispirited Scott as an English-teacher trainee, telling her she'd soon "get over" her idealism, that the young woman quit the gig to start working full time at even more creative endeavors. Clearly, things have turned out well for the singer/poet/actress and community philanthropist (see sidebar)
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
It is a fitting coincidence that Brit "It Girl" Adele launched her much-anticipated stateside tour the same weekend that Bridesmaids, team Apatow's rowdy girl-centric answer to The Hangover , opened in theaters across the country. The movie is a burgeoning box-office hit, and the singer is a budding superstar whose mass-appeal music could aptly be described as chick-flick soul. Her calling card is that voice: Big, bracing, and acrobatic enough to wow the nattering class that tunes in weekly for American Idol , but inflected with a hard-won world-weariness that defies her tender age. Her recently released 21 , titled after the London-based singer-songwriter's age when she recorded the album (Adele just turned 23)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Most eyes and ears will focus on superstar album releases hitting stores today from Eric Clapton, Neil Young and Seal. But here's hoping other worthies don't get buried in the onslaught. TOP OF THE CROP: What happens when a smart and seasoned American piano man ( Ben Folds ) puts his keening voice and crafty tunes to the lyrics of a noted British novelist/screenwriter ( Nick Hornsby ) obsessed with pop culture? Great things, a wondrous ride down the paths of "Lonely Avenue" (Nonesuch, A)
NEWS
January 26, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
These days, it's not so easy to find indie-rock that actually rocks in any sort of aggressive, messy, blood-on-the-floor way. But indie rock that sings, that soars to the heavens under the influence of the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds and sounds like its practitioners are aficionados of Gregorian chant - there's plenty of that to go around. In 2008, the breakout celestial harmonizing indie outfit was Fleet Foxes, the band of not-so-merry-sounding woodsmen from the Pacific Northwest.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|