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NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
When you walk into the living room of Steve Fitch's historic home at Washington Crossing, the first thing that catches your eye is a pink neon arrow that hangs on the old stone wall above the fireplace. The glowing arrow appears to defy the antique furnishings in the room. Fitch is a neon artist whose major themes combine the old and the new. He is intrigued by Indians and their lore, which is why arrows are the most popular neon design he makes. He considers the arrow a universal symbol and also one that is prehistoric; the neon is modern.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Little did Walter Spokas realize, back in 1932, that those huge letters he helped haul to the top of the brand-new PSFS building would become a Philadelphia landmark. Spokas, now 77, remembers raising each of the four 27-foot-high letters up the side of the 33-story building, one at a time, by rope. "They didn't have the kind of cranes they have now," he commented. "We pulled each one up by hand. " The PSFS letters are back in the news today because, under an agreement between Meritor Savings Bank, which leases the building on which they are located, and Mellon Bank Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Too many villains. Too many superhero suits. There's no denying that Iron Man 2 is just too too. At its best, it's shaggily enjoyable and enjoyably shaggy. It's like steroids on steroids with Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark, disarming arms industrialist, tossing off one-liners like comic grenades. Stark sees no conflict in taking government subsidies while retaining private ownership of bleeding-edge weaponry. Nor does IM2 , directed by Jon Favreau and written by Justin Theroux ( Tropic Thunder )
SPORTS
August 12, 1994 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
"Gotta do it. He's 'Prime Time.' " "How could we afford him?" "We'd have to welcome an athlete like that. " "I don't think we need him. " "Any time you can get a Deion, you do it. " Those were a few reactions among the Eagles yesterday as news of owner Jeffrey Lurie's meeting with, and interest in signing, two-sport star Deion Sanders blew through Schmidt Hall to the practice field, to the cafeteria and back across West Chester...
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Neon lights have been ruled a "decorative amenity and not a sign" for the $1.8 million plan to refurbish the Westtown Marketplace on Route 3. Township regulations prohibit the use of neon signs or lights to outline buildings. Although Westtown Supervisors L. Charles Scipione and A. Pierson Sill objected mildly to the use of the tubular neon lights as a design element, they nevertheless allowed architect Bill Kramer of Wyndmoor, Montgomery County, to go ahead with his design. Supervisor Richard H. Walker was not at Monday's meeting.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Loews hotel chain has tinkered for 15 years to keep the neon PSFS sign aglow on Philadelphia's skyline, but officials said Tuesday they believed the time had come to do away with the old and bring in the new. Arguing that the 83-year-old sign has become too costly and burdensome to maintain, Loews representatives asked the Philadelphia Historical Commission for permission to replace the neon tubes and transformers of the signature red sign...
NEWS
May 22, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
'Voyeur," Tristin Lowe's third show at Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, catches the Philadelphia artist on a roll, still making his remarkable fuzzy facsimiles of familiar objects in off-white felt, but also expressing his dark humor and affection for the impossible in neon and photography. Some of Lowe's sewn felt pieces are mounted over hardened foam shapes. Near Miss is a meteor of sewn felt perched on a white sculpture pedestal. A pair of white felt jeans, Genes: Standard Model , standing eerily upright on another pedestal, is Lowe's self-portrait.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
In 1973, the Washington artist Rockne Krebs installed a laser at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, whose beam bounced off mirrors at City Hall and back and created a web of light above the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The light was on for only three weeks, but almost 20 years later, it still shines in the memories of many Philadelphians. There have, over the years, been informal proposals for permanent laser installations - including a recent one by former city planning chief Edmund Bacon.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Envision a 25-foot-tall neon cowboy high atop the wall of a Boardwalk casino. Splashed in patriotic red, white, and blue, the cowboy moves his arms as if to beckon motorists on the Atlantic City Expressway. It's Las Vegas glitz at its brightest, and it could be the vision of Atlantic City's future. Last week, City Council adopted the ordinance that could turn this resort into a forest of moving neon lights by removing longstanding restrictions in the casino district. While no casino has proposed something as gaudy as a neon cowboy, such a display falls within the dictates of the new law. "It opens the door to running, flashy lights," said Jay Fiedler, of the city planning department.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The red neon PSFS sign, Philadelphia's most prominent night light for 58 years, has been turned off. And there are no plans to turn it back on. Thus a landmark has disappeared from the Philadelphia skyline - not through demolition, but by a simple decision to turn out the lights. The 27-foot neon letters atop the PSFS Building at 12th and Market Streets, which opened in 1932 and was the world's first skyscraper built in a modernist architectural style, have not been illuminated since May 21. The asymmetrical double-faced sign hides air conditioning and other mechanical equipment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 3, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
CINCINNATI - It's hard to imagine a classic American road trip that doesn't pass through dusty, forgotten towns with vintage neon signs advertising motels and roadside diners, still trying to lure motorists. Many of those signs are disappearing, victims of age, weather, and neglect. There's a glimmer of hope, though, for their rescue and preservation. For a guy who has spent his life around signs, Tod Swormstedt sure has a difficult name to fit on one. He's the founder of the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati, a celebration of the art of signage, from painted wooden panels to wildly lighted neon extravaganzas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's widely considered by critics as one of the top directors in the world, but Taiwan-based Malaysian Chinese auteur Tsai Ming-liang's works are hardly rarefied creations. And while he's something of a minimalist, his movies do not have the antiseptic, static, arid feel of so many films classed under that banner. Films such as Vive L'Amour (1994), The River (1997), and his most recent entry, the 2013 masterpiece Stray Dogs are lively, urban parables that burrow into the nitty-gritty of life in modern Taipei.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Loews hotel chain has tinkered for 15 years to keep the neon PSFS sign aglow on Philadelphia's skyline, but officials said Tuesday they believed the time had come to do away with the old and bring in the new. Arguing that the 83-year-old sign has become too costly and burdensome to maintain, Loews representatives asked the Philadelphia Historical Commission for permission to replace the neon tubes and transformers of the signature red sign...
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The more shined up Philadelphia becomes, the more we've come to appreciate the oddball relics from its grittier days, before the city became a must-see vacation destination. It's as if their presence keeps us connected to the city's true self. The nonfunctioning neon sign attached to the Boot & Saddle bar on South Broad Street is one of my favorites. Nearly two stories high, the sign was created as an outsize calling card for the country-western music club that opened there around 1950 and catered to Navy Yard workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Len Davidson is always up for a little light banter. That is, as long as the light in question isn't LED. "LEDs," he said, "are the enemy. " After all, Davidson has spent 33 years championing LEDs' precursor, neon, as a historian, preservationist, and craftsman. Now, he can count at least one victory in that long battle. It's on display along 12th and Arch Streets, where, he said, "it's like a little neon paradise right now. " What he sees as a growing illuminated corridor begins at 12th and Market, where Hard Rock Cafe's neon-trimmed electric guitar does perpetual pirouettes, and continues north through the neon-happy Reading Terminal Market (Davidson, 66, made or restored about half the signs there, including the huge classic sign marking the entrance)
SPORTS
July 8, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
When Texas state senator Wendy Davis made national news in late June with an 11-hour filibuster, she sparked a heated debate in the running community - about the sneakers she wore while standing so long to speak. Where they pink or red? The running shoes Davis wore are also my main training shoe: the Mizuno Wave Rider 16, one of the company's most popular. According to Doug Smiley, Mizuno's business unit manager for footwear, the color of the Wendy Davis shoe is "rouge red. " Here's where the argument comes in. To me, that's not red. Red is what you find in the stripe of an American flag, not the inside of a watermelon.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2013 | By Andrea Sachs, Washington Post
NEW YORK - On a walking tour of Times Square, something supercalifragilisticexpialidocious happened. With the guide at my side, I was strolling along the streets without causing any casualties. No banging into clumps of tourists or wiping small children off my shoe. It was as if the guide, a Mary Poppins in a Yankees cap, had cast a spell, clearing the Great White Way for our party of two. Each day, 370,000 people parachute into Times Square. The pedestrian speed limit is snail-crawling-in-molasses.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hiway Theater completed its back-to-the-'40s restoration five years ago, but one thing was always missing: Its outdoor sign. The 18-foot, five-letter neon tower, which for decades signaled the single-screen theater's glitz and vitality, disappeared in the 1980s amid a succession of owners and names. Now that war-era beacon - or rather, a down-to-the-bolt reproduction - has returned to its perch atop the Hiway in Jenkintown. At night, it bathes Old York Road in a warm amber glow.
SPORTS
September 11, 2011 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Ability to score on both sides of the ball and as a kick returner? Check. Ever-present swagger? Check. Do-rag? Check. Yes, Germantown's Will Parks could be the next Deion Sanders, the athletic senior's all-time favorite NFL player. But wasn't Parks sometimes rubbed the wrong way by the Hall of Famer's showboating? "Nah," he said. "If you want to have fun, have fun. It's OK to show your love for the game. " As Sanders was for several NFL clubs, Parks is a do-everything type for the Bears.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ability to score on both sides of the ball and as a kick returner? Check. Ever-present swagger? Check. Do-rag? Check. Yes, Germantown's Will Parks could be the next Deion Sanders, the athletic senior's all-time favorite NFL player. But wasn't Parks sometimes rubbed the wrong way with the Hall of Famer's showboating? "Nah," he said. "If you want to have fun, have fun. It's OK to show your love for the game. " As Sanders was for several NFL clubs, Parks is a do-everything type for the Bears.
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