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Nerds

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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Depending on whom you talk to, the Nerds are: "Anti-charismatic. " "Unwanted party guests from hell. " "Comedian Gilbert Gottfried's favorite band. " No matter who they are, what they are is a rollicking cover band with a quirky style and a cult following that was apparent at the group's first area appearance at Taylor's in Cherry Hill last week. "We're having trouble telling the real nerds from those who dressed up," said club manager Jeff Oddo, who promised to excuse any real, live nerds from the $5 cover charge.
NEWS
August 22, 1987
Schoolchildren discover their role models at an early age. At home, father spends perhaps two to six hours a week watching sports on television. At school, the jocks are on top of the pecking order and coaches are often celebrities. The advisers to the chess club or debate team get no respect. Therefore it should come as no surprise the average football coach in Pennsylvania's public schools receives eight times as much extra compensation for extracurricular activities as the adviser to the National Honor Society and three times as much as the drama adviser.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | By Rachel Emma Silverman, For the Daily News
Techies want to reprogram their image. With an estimated 850,000 information-technology jobs expected to go unfilled in the next year, the U.S. Department of Commerce, along with several states and trade groups, have all come to the same conclusion: Information-technology careers are viewed as "uncool, nerdy and boring" by American youth. That's the specific finding of a study by the Rhode Island Economic Policy Council. The think-tank's report adds: "Computers are just like cars: teen-agers want to use computers, but not build or maintain them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
Kirk Cameron, the 16-year-old star of ABC's "Growing Pains," follows the Pritikin Diet religiously. This means that he not only cares about his health, he also likes vegetables. As much as Cameron likes vegetables, that is how much he hates drugs. His face will soon appear on boxes of Zip-Loc sandwich bags as part of an anti- drug campaign. Cameron also disapproves of cigarettes. He fought for a no- smoking ban on the set of "Growing Pains," enraging his adult co-workers. Ten years ago, these things would have labeled Kirk Cameron a twerp.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
You realize how many of the famous people of today were nerds in high school? Low self-esteem leads to success. The fact that everybody made us feel so bad in high school made us want to be somebody later in life. Nancy Glass "The Nancy Glass Show," WYXR-FM (104.5), June 4
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | Los Angeles Daily News
A trendy Los Angeles nightclub must stop refusing admission to people who are not dressed "cool" or lack the proper club image and admit the general public, a state judge has ruled. Administrative Law Judge Milford A. Maron ruled that the Vertigo nightclub must post a sign stating its open admission policy. Joshua Kaplan, the attorney representing the nightclub, said yesterday that the club will continue to operate as usual while he appeals the decision. He said that the ruling violates free enterprise rights.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | By Richard Cohen
In Texas, high school athletes are being asked to pass their courses before suiting up for games. In Georgia, a one-time teacher won a $2.6 million award from the University of Georgia after being fired for opposing favored treatment for athletes, and the NCAA has raised eligibility requirements for athletes. Something is happening. Call it the "Revenge of the Nerds. " Across the nation, high-school and college sports programs are being scrutinized and awful things are being found.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | By JAMI BERNARD New York Daily News
It's the revenge of the nerds all over again. Hot on the heels of "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," a box-office hit about a geek trying to get his motor revved once and for all, comes "The Baxter," another comedy about guys who finish last in the bedroom. But while "Virgin" is a scream, "The Baxter," like its loser-ish hero, is modest and polite. That's not a ringing endorsement of Michael Showalter's good-natured comedy, but there are enough laughs in it if you're willing to settle.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Youngblood. " A drama starring Rob Lowe and Patrick Swayze. Written and directed by Peter Markle from a screenplay by John Whitman and Markle. Photographed by Mark Irwin. Edited by Stephen E. Rivkin and Josh Hofstra. Music by William Orbit/Torchsong. Running time: 109 minutes. An MGM/U.A. release. "The Best of Times. " A comedy-drama starring Robin Williams, Kurt Russell, Pamela Reed and Holly Palance. Directed by Roger Spottiswoode from a screenplay by Ron Shelton. Photographed by Charles F. Wheeler.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S a new (2.0 edition) musical in town called "Nerds" that techies will relish for its smart, insider's perspective and that pretty much any theater fan should enjoy for its flip attitude (think "Book of Mormon," "Avenue Q" and "Spamalot"), inspired performances, rocking (and even rappin') show tunes and snappy staging. Just launched by the Philadelphia Theatre Company at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre, "Nerds" is a ridiculously amusing, mocking and also knowledgeable (ouch!) send-up of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, the oft-warring titans of tech who changed everything with the commercialization of affordable and user-friendly (sometimes)
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NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Layla Jones, PHILLY.COM
Ahead of his very recent musical ascension, Armani White says he destroyed himself, deleting from public view all his music on the Internet. Then he rebuilt, working with a new team of people in hopes of rebranding himself. But not long after, he destroyed himself again and rebuilt. Destroy. Rebuild. Destroy. Despite it all - or maybe because of it - the New-Age black nerd rapper from West Philadelphia is quickly making a name for himself with his rapid-fire lyrical flow. Armani screams complexity and contradiction.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zach Woods, the Trenton-born, Yardley-bred star of HBO's Silicon Valley , roused the ire of many a Philadelphian last month when he said Philadelphia is "kind of a racist city" on Marc Maron's WTF podcast. Adding insult to injury, he referenced a mishmash of memories about fan behavior: "When I was growing up and Santa Claus would skate onto the ice around Christmastime at Flyers games, people would throw batteries at Santa Claus," Woods told Maron. Uh, nope. "I totally get how I sound like some B-list moron bashing Philly," Woods said about the podcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Here comes the nerd squad!" This is how forensic scientist Gil Grissom is greeted as he arrives at a crime scene in the pilot episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation in October 2000. Spoken by a couple of macho cavemen cops, the word nerd was meant to be derisory, but Gil wore it as a badge of honor during the nine seasons he was the top nerd on the CBS procedural, a tenure ending in 2009. CSI wasn't unlike most cop shows: Its heroes didn't pack guns and handcuffs, but tweezers and test tubes.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AS A SEA of smiling faces surged around her, no one at Community College of Philadelphia's graduation was more joyful than Wanda Klinefelter of Mayfair - unless it was her mom, Gloria. "My mom's held our family together," said Klinefelter, 34, who was among 2,000 students graduating from CCP over the weekend at Temple University's Liacouras Center. "Mom worked as a housekeeper and sacrificed so much for me, my brother and my sister," Klinefelter said. Her mom said, "I love you and I am a very proud Mama Dukes.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joel Hodgson made his bones as the creator and star of the cult classic show Mystery Science Theater 3000 . The beloved comedy (Jerry Seinfeld called Hodgson one of his "favorite cultural visionaries") featured Hodgson as a janitor trapped on a spaceship, forced to watch B movies, riffing along with robot buddies he constructs to keep him sane. Hodgson left MST3K , as it's affectionately known, in 1993. But he's back in orbit for his first regular acting gig since MST3K in Other Space , a Web series on Yahoo Screen.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
There are many reasons to be apprehensive about whether a dating app can deliver true love, but I won't play coy with you. What has kept me from uploading myself to Cupid's digital arrow is this: the pictures. Perhaps I'm revealing myself to be vain, or maybe insecure, but this is real talk, #nofilter. The prospect of choosing pictures of myself for potential dates to judge gives me a cold sweat. First, there's the feminist objection. Aren't women objectified enough? With many dating apps like Tinder, the written bios are short-to-nonexistent, and the profiles are primarily photos.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
"THE BIG BANG THEORY" is reportedly the most popular sitcom in the world. Perhaps the solar system. It's been translated into more languages than Sheldon knows and generated enough revenue to launch Howard into space or get Raj a girlfriend. As it is so popular, the actors want to receive just compensation. At the moment the number being bandied about for just compensation is $1 million per episode, per actor (and it's not as if they were making $8 an episode last year)
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writerstansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
AT THIS YEAR'S Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con convention, attendees can travel back in time in the Delorean, ride with Dinosaurs in the Jurassic Park jeep or try their hand at sci-fi speed dating. "Find your perfect nerd," shouted the two men manning the dating setup. Turning their noses up at the vendor, two young Dr. Who fans shouted toward the booth: "I do not dream about nerds, I dream about comic books!" At the first day of the annual four-day festival yesterday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, diehards were enthused.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA One of Philly Tech Week's new events had a shaky start Sunday, but it wasn't a complete strikeout. Baseball Hack Day, a Boston event brought to Philadelphia for the first time to encourage baseball-themed app and website designs, went on despite a six-person turnout at Indy Hall in Old City. The 2012 and 2013 events in Beantown each drew about 30 participants, who were divided into working teams of two or three. "It's just a day where we get together and chat about baseball," said organizer Kyle Fiedler, 28, a developer at Thoughtbot Inc. who moved to Philadelphia from Boston last year and who wanted to replicate his Baseball Hack Day experience in the Hub here.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S a new (2.0 edition) musical in town called "Nerds" that techies will relish for its smart, insider's perspective and that pretty much any theater fan should enjoy for its flip attitude (think "Book of Mormon," "Avenue Q" and "Spamalot"), inspired performances, rocking (and even rappin') show tunes and snappy staging. Just launched by the Philadelphia Theatre Company at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre, "Nerds" is a ridiculously amusing, mocking and also knowledgeable (ouch!) send-up of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, the oft-warring titans of tech who changed everything with the commercialization of affordable and user-friendly (sometimes)
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