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Neshaminy School District

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NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
This week's strike by the 654-member Neshaminy Federation of Teachers could stretch until Feb. 2, which would extend the school year by more than two weeks, the state Department of Education has determined. Union spokesman Bob Schiers declined Thursday to say when the teachers would return to work. "We've received the state's notification and opinions," he said, "and we're aware of those dates. " The Education Department presented two dates - Jan. 20 and Feb. 2 - for the teachers to return to work and comply with state Act 88, which guarantees 180 days of classes by June 30, District Superintendent Louis Muenker said.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph E. Ferderbar, 57, recently retired superintendent of the Neshaminy School District, died Thursday of a heart attack. Dr. Ferderbar, a resident of Langhorne, served as superintendent of the school district for 16 years. A native of Fair Oaks, Pa., Dr. Ferderbar graduated from Slippery Rock State College and received his master's and doctorate in education from the University of Pittsburgh. He began his career in education as an elementary school teacher in Leet Township.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Neshaminy School District teachers will continue their strike this week but will return to classrooms Friday, union president Louise Boyd said at a "We are not alone" rally Monday at Core Creek Park. About 400 members and supporters of the Neshaminy Federation of Teachers heard speeches of encouragement by leaders past and present and representatives of other unions, including the American Federation of Teachers, the Pennsylvania State Education Association, AFSCME, and the Teamsters.
SPORTS
October 16, 2012 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neshaminy School District officials are looking into an allegation that longtime football coach Mark Schmidt acted inappropriately toward a player during Friday night's game against visiting Council Rock South. Schmidt grabbed a player during the second half, said one person who attended the game and asked to remain anonymous. "I can confirm to you that district officials are aware of an alleged incident that took place in last week's football game involving a Neshaminy player and a member of our coaching staff," school board president Ritchie Webb said Tuesday, reading from a prepared statement.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Bucks County Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence will hold its 11th annual Lead-On Youth leadership conference at Bucks County Community College on Tuesday. The all-day conference will encourage students to get involved in preventing abuse of alcohol and other drugs. More than 460 students from 42 schools and organizations will participate. The conference, for sixth to 12th graders and their advisers, will offer more than 30 workshops on drugs and alcohol, violence, health issues, relationships, and eating disorders.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than 100 Neshaminy School District teachers, parents and support staff will be honored tomorrow night as part of the Gift of Time Tribute. The ceremony, which will take place at the Holiday Inn in Trevose, is sponsored by the American Family Institute at Valley Forge, a nonprofit organization. The Gift of Time Tribute honors those who make a difference in the lives of children, said Anthony P. Witham, president of the organization. "The purpose is to show how the little differences are really big differences," he said.
SPORTS
October 18, 2012 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neshaminy School District officials have suspended longtime Neshaminy football coach Mark Schmidt for grabbing one of his players by the jersey in a game last week. Schmidt will not direct practices this week or be on the sideline for Friday night's Suburban One League National Conference game at Bensalem. He said he can resume his coaching duties Saturday. Neshaminy principal Rob McGee and athletic director Tom Magdelinskas did not return phone calls seeking comment. Schmidt came under fire for his action after a personal-foul call in the second half of last Friday's 21-14 win over visiting Council Rock South.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Better. But still not good enough. That's how Gillian McGoldrick, editor-in-chief of Neshaminy High School's Playwickian, views the revised newspaper policy that the Neshaminy School District's policy committee endorsed Tuesday evening. The committee will recommend it to the full board Thursday. Committee members discussed the revised policy - which took into account suggestions from student editors - and heard comment from students, parents, and residents. The revised policy does not budge on administrators' right to review the paper prior to publication, but it did concede to students' requests in differentiating between news articles and editorials.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a successful 19-year stint, Mark Schmidt has stepped down as Neshaminy High's head football coach. "I thought it was the right time to move on," Schmidt, 53, said. "I've been thinking about this for a year or two. You don't want to wear out your welcome. This gives someone else a chance to take over and keep things going in the right direction. " Schmidt, who guided the Redskins to a 161-66 record (.709 winning percentage) and won three PIAA District 1 Class AAAA championships, submitted his letter of resignation Monday to Neshaminy School District officials and also spoke to his players.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As an administrator for the Washington Township School District, Susan Rodgers Reintzel "was really effective at being a calming presence," said Jan Giel, the student information manager there. Mrs. Reintzel was Washington Township's director of secondary education from May 2001, and then its director of student services and community outreach from January 2003 to her retirement in 2007. "She was tremendously calm and reasonable with parents," Giel said, especially in "volatile situations.
REAL_ESTATE
June 1, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. To make sure you know where we are, this is the Middletown with several Levittown neighborhoods in its southern half. The portion of the township that has Langhorne as its mailing address is home to Oxford Valley Mall and Big Bird, Grover, Elmo, Bert and Ernie, et al, at Sesame Place. Middletown Township, Bucks County, as opposed to the Middletown Township in Delaware County. This Middletown "is an interesting township for real estate," says Martin Millner, an agent with Coldwell Banker Hearthside in neighboring Yardley.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even the Christmas season evidently can't bring peace on Earth to the contentious Neshaminy School District, where a bitter labor dispute with the teachers' union dragged on for five years, and an uproar over the high school's Redskins mascot and student journalists' free speech made national headlines. Now, the school board is being accused of trying to ram through a controversial consolidation plan - even of stifling parental consent by scheduling a hearing for the same time as their children's holiday concerts.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was Neshaminy's final home football game of the season, and that made Friday night's battle against rival Pennsbury the team's senior night. The players entered Harry E. Franks Stadium by sprinting through a "senior night" banner. They escorted their parents onto the field, walking under an arch of blue and red balloons. The marching band did the same. The cheerleaders, too. Absent from the pageantry - which preceded a 17-3 loss in a Suburban One National game - were some of Neshaminy's key players.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
News travels fast. A day after word surfaced that the faculty adviser of Neshaminy High School's student newspaper was suspended for two days during a long-running dispute about use of the word Redskin , student journalists in California launched an online campaign to cover the salary she will lose on suspension. Their webpage, titled "Free the Playwickian," also seeks to raise the $1,200 the Neshaminy School District cut from the student newspaper's activity fund. Both actions, and the decision to strip the editor in chief of her title for a month, were apparent punishments for the newspaper's decision to reject for its June edition an op-ed piece containing Redskin . The fund-raising effort, unknown to Neshaminy students until they were told by The Inquirer, demonstrates how far the debate over the school's team nickname, which a number of American Indians find offensive, has resonated beyond the Bucks County school.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Growing up in Washington, we worshiped the football team, partly because baseball's Senators had gone and moved to Texas, of all places, but mostly because D.C. is more of a football sort of place. The sport, like politics, is nasty, expensive, and quick to adopt rules that defy logic. We warbled "Hail to the Redskins," donned burgundy-and-gold shirts (unflattering to all), the whole business, even though my father was a civil rights attorney who defended Native Americans in the 1972 takeover of the Bureau of Indian Affairs building to demand improved treaties and living standards.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Better. But still not good enough. That's how Gillian McGoldrick, editor-in-chief of Neshaminy High School's Playwickian, views the revised newspaper policy that the Neshaminy School District's policy committee endorsed Tuesday evening. The committee will recommend it to the full board Thursday. Committee members discussed the revised policy - which took into account suggestions from student editors - and heard comment from students, parents, and residents. The revised policy does not budge on administrators' right to review the paper prior to publication, but it did concede to students' requests in differentiating between news articles and editorials.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a successful 19-year stint, Mark Schmidt has stepped down as Neshaminy High's head football coach. "I thought it was the right time to move on," Schmidt, 53, said. "I've been thinking about this for a year or two. You don't want to wear out your welcome. This gives someone else a chance to take over and keep things going in the right direction. " Schmidt, who guided the Redskins to a 161-66 record (.709 winning percentage) and won three PIAA District 1 Class AAAA championships, submitted his letter of resignation Monday to Neshaminy School District officials and also spoke to his players.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A twist in a series of regional school construction projects came Tuesday night in the Neshaminy School District, where the school board announced that it would reexamine a contentious $50 million school consolidation plan because of concerns about its financial viability. The plan had run into impassioned opposition. It would have replaced three aging elementary schools with one new facility for about 1,200 students. Officials said the new building was a necessary investment because the old schools were draining district resources.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of the holiday weekend, Anne Schmidt suddenly felt sick to her stomach - and she couldn't have been happier about it. Schmidt, vice president of the Neshaminy Federation of Teachers - whose members have spent five years working without a new contract from the Neshaminy School District - has been through many a tough negotiation. And after 28 years as a teacher, she said, she knows exactly what it feels like when a deal is about to be reached. "I told our leadership group that in the end, you're going to feel a little sick, worrying about whether or not you missed something," she said, laughing.
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