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NEWS
December 18, 2012 | The Motley Fool
I'M EMBARRASSED just thinking about it. I've owned Netflix since it was $19 a share. When it hit $277, I sold. The next day it went up to $283, and I thought, "What was I thinking?" and bought it back. The rest is sad history: It's now around $90 per share. My original gut instinct was accurate, but greed got in the way and I'm paying for it now. I've lost a lot, but at least I did milk the stock over the years, taking profits numerous times to expand my portfolio in other directions.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2012 | By Cliff Edwards, Bloomberg News
Netflix Inc. and chief executive officer Reed Hastings said they may face a Securities and Exchange Commission civil claim over a July Facebook post that coincided with a big gain in the company's stock price. SEC staff alleges Netflix and its CEO violated rules governing selective disclosure, according to a company filing. The July 3 post by Hastings said Netflix viewing "exceeded 1 billion hours" of videos in June. The shares rose 6.2 percent that day. The SEC action highlights the potential for legal trouble when company executives like Hastings, who has more than 200,000 Facebook fans, communicate with the public via social media.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
STILL THINK of streaming Netflix as something you do on a computer? Think again. You can still watch that way, but the service - which charges $7.99 a month for unlimited streaming from its library of TV shows and movies - is available on a variety of devices, from game systems to DVD players, that connect to your television, as well as on the iPhone and Windows phone and the iPad, Kindle Fire and Nook tablets. (A $4.99-a-month plan limits users to two hours of streaming a month and only on a computer.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Frazier Moore, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Portia de Rossi only believed it was happening when her agent got the good news from the producers. Michael Cera only believed it was happening when the cameras rolled. It happened all right. Arrested Development has risen from the dead with 15 half-hours premiering en masse on Netflix on Sunday at 3:01 a.m. Arrested Development is the cockeyed comedy blessed with a king's ransom of talent and the twisted vision of its mastermind, Mitch Hurwitz, that aired on Fox for three seasons as a cult favorite, then was canceled for low ratings - and maybe because it befuddled everyone who wasn't hooked on its lunacy.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Reed Stevenson, Bloomberg News
Netflix Inc., the world's biggest video-streaming service, said access to its movies and television shows was restored after a disruption caused by Amazon.com Inc.'s Web storage and computing system. Many customers in the Americas weren't able to access content online Monday from around 3:30 p.m. Philadelphia time until late Christmas Eve, according to Joris Evers, a spokesman for Netflix. The blockage was caused by issues with Amazon Web Services, a business hosted on the Internet that's separate from the online retail store, he said.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
If this week's online fury over Netflix's price increase proved anything, the obvious choice was this: You can't take away a good deal and not expect people to squawk. Netflix said it was dropping its $10 rock-bottom subscription fee for its combination service - unlimited video streaming plus unlimited DVDs by mail, one at a time. To get the same combo, customers will have to cough up $16 a month, or $7.99 apiece for either streaming or DVDs. Within hours, tens of thousands of customers had complained online - on Netflix's blog, on its Facebook page, and anywhere else they could think of. Many promised to cancel rather than submit.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, when Netflix announced a price hike for its DVD rentals, reaction from its customers was so off the charts you had to wonder what it was really about. Tens of thousands of posts flooded the company's Facebook page, variously spewing venom or demanding vaguely defined justice. Why? Netflix, purveyor of to-your-doorstep-or-laptop movies and shows, whose Internet-age business model helped eradicate store-based rental rivals, said it would charge $6 more per month in return for the ability to stream or mail-order DVDs.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raising the stakes in streamed entertainment, phone giant Verizon Communications Inc. will launch a new national streaming service in a joint venture with DVD-rental firm Redbox later this year. The venture will be a direct competitor to Netflix, which now has more than 20 million subscribers, by offering DVD rentals through 35,000 Redbox kiosks and Internet-streamed entertainment by Verizon. Verizon will own 65 percent of the venture and Coinstar Inc., which owns Redbox, will own 35 percent.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Netflix is raising its prices by as much as 60 percent for millions of subscribers who want to rent DVDs by mail and watch video on the Internet. The company is separating the two options so that subscribers who want both will have to buy separate plans totaling at least $16 per month. Netflix Inc. had been bundling both options in a single package, available for as low as $10 per month. New subscribers will have to pay the new prices immediately. The changes take effect Sept.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Before driving to work one day last week, I opened Google Maps on my iPhone to check alternate routes. Recently updated, the app requested personal information - my home and work addresses - before warning me about traffic congestion on the Schuylkill Expressway. I didn't need to scour its privacy policy to know the deal. The addresses would make the app a bit more useful, but they were also something Google wanted for its own purposes. The Internet is full of such basic and open quid pro quos that link "edge providers" at one end with consumers like me at the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy little tiny baby smidgen honey pumpkin! Mila Kunis bore a girl bairn Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai in L.A.! The dad: Ashton Kutcher , first guy she ever kissed (on That '70s Show ). No baby name announced yet. The two reunited after A-Kutch dumped spouse Demi Moore in 2012. Once the biggest mouth in social media, since Mila he has been decorously reserved re their private stuff. They're living in sin most vile, but are engaged.   Movies dive into the stream!
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp., seeking to counter sharp opposition from thousands of customers, consumer advocates, and competitors to its proposed $45.2 billion takeover of Time Warner Cable Inc., once again urged the Federal Communications Commission to approve a deal that would cement Comcast's status as the nation's largest cable-TV and broadband Internet provider. In comments submitted late Tuesday to the FCC, Comcast said the acquisition offered a broad range of benefits both to the combined companies' 30-million-plus customers as well as "to individuals, businesses, institutions, and community organizations across the nation," despite criticism from many of the about 65,000 who voiced opinions to the agency before last month's deadline.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fourteen years ago in a prior wave of telecom mergers, Justice Department officials determined that combining two of the nation's largest Internet portals, Excite@Home and Road Runner, posed a "gatekeeper" threat to fledgling Internet-based content companies. For a content company to reach American consumers over the Internet, they would have to go through the Excite@Home or Road Runner portals. This was too much market power concentrated in one company, and the Justice Department forced MediaOne Group Inc. to sell Road Runner before it could be acquired by AT&T.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Netflix Inc., Dish Network, and the Los Angeles County government are among organizations opposing Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc., based on documents filed right up to the midnight Monday deadline with the Federal Communications Commission. Reed Hastings, chief executive officer of the online streamer Netflix, had signaled that the company could oppose a combined Comcast/Time Warner Cable, which would provide more than one-third of U.S. consumers with high-speed Internet service.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* EVOLUTION OF A CRIMINAL. 12:45 p.m. Sunday, BlackStar Film Festival, International House. Tickets: $10. Info: blackstarfest.org. * THE KILLING. Season 4 on Netflix beginning today. LANDING SPIKE LEE as executive producer of his first film is only a piece of the good fortune of Darius Clark Monroe. An honor student who became a bank robber at 16 in an attempt to help his family, Monroe was sentenced to five years in prison, emerging with a determination to go to New York University to learn how to make movies.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
PART OF A LAWSUIT against NBC Universal that claims the television network defamed gun-toting neighborhood-watch vigilante George Zimmerman in a 2012 broadcast was thrown out by a Florida judge yesterday, putting the entire litigation in jeopardy. Zimmerman's lawyers waited too long under Florida statute to ask NBC to retract what they claimed were libelous statements in a March 19, 2012, broadcast that they said made their client sound like a racist, Seminole County Circuit Judge Debra Nelson ruled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK. Season 2 premieres Friday, Netflix. * JENNIFER FALLS. 10:30 tonight, TV Land.   NETFLIX didn't invent binge-watching, but with the prison drama "Orange Is the New Black" it did give us something to make the bingeing worth it. Not just because it was so good, which it was, but because making 13 episodes available at once allowed "Orange" to transform itself from a show about the incarceration of one formerly...
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
I walk daily at a mall. It's warmer in winter, cooler in summer, and the shoppers and ever-changing store windows are a welcome distraction from the exercise. But every week, or so it seems, there are fewer shoppers and more empty windows. Not far away from the moribund mall our neighborhood movie theater was recently converted into an auto dealership. Though only 14 years old, the amenities-laden multiplex proved to be a poor competitor for Netflix and a 21st-century den. Retail stores and theaters are no match for the combination of indolence and the Internet.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wednesday is the birthday of the World Wide Web. It's 25, a generation old. Together with the Internet, on which it works, it's the most ambiguous invention in human history. The Web/Internet is Shiva: god of creation, god of destruction. It has birthed a world once unimaginable. Robert Thompson, professor of television and popular culture at Syracuse University, says everyone has "the power to access and use others' information, and to produce our own, and send it around the world.
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