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Neuroblastoma

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NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using DNA samples donated by thousands of patients at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, doctors have found a lead in their hunt for the causes of neuroblastoma, the baffling cancer that killed Alex of Alex's Lemonade Stand at age 8. "Until this study, we had no clue why one child gets this and not another," said the hospital's John Maris, who led the work and was Alex's oncologist. Like Alex Scott, many children who get neuroblastoma are treated with a grueling course of chemotherapy, radiation and stem-cell transplants.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new treatment for the deadly children's cancer neuroblastoma dramatically improves survival and has become part of the standard course of care even before results were published. The study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and other top pediatric hospitals represents the first major improvement in survival for high-risk neuroblastoma in more than a decade, and the techniques involved might be adapted to other cancers such as melanoma. The approach involves boosting the child's immune system and helping it target cancer cells.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Maris has spent more than 20 years trying to understand why some children get an often-fatal cancer called neuroblastoma. There was no obvious environmental factor, and a genetic variation seemed to be involved. But how to find it? Then, he and his colleagues at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia got the chance to try something that would have been unimaginable just a few years earlier: Scan the DNA of hundreds of children stricken with the disease and compare it with DNA from thousands of healthy children in a control group.
NEWS
December 2, 2009 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
LOOKING at Kyler VanNocker, whose fifth birthday was Monday, it's impossible to fathom that he could die from the disease he's battling. He's bright-eyed and energetic as he tears around the house he shares in Edgewater Park, N.J., with his parents, Paul and Maria, and siblings Kaden, 6, and Anelise, 3. He's just as active at pre-school, where he's learning his numbers and the alphabet. But the truth is, Kyler has neuroblastoma, a rare and deadly form of childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system, creating tumors throughout the body.
NEWS
August 14, 2005 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To parents of children with pediatric cancer, Alex Scott is practically a saint. "Alex is such a great legacy," said John London, who takes his 3-year-old daughter, Penelope, back and forth from New York to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where Alex herself was treated until her death at age 8 on Aug. 1, 2004. As with pilgrims to Lourdes, parents nationwide bring children with cancer to Children's, which, already a leader in the field, has been able to treat more patients and test more treatments because of grants from the charity begun by Alex when she was 4. From one front-yard lemonade stand five years ago, the charity has become a nationwide cause that has raised more than $3 million to fight childhood cancer.
NEWS
December 10, 2009 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN YOUR little boy is fighting a brutal form of cancer, the last thing you want is to expose his frail health to anything viral. Last week, when Paul and Maria VanNocker let me tell of their son Kyler's battle to receive a potentially life-saving treatment, his story went viral. This virus could save Kyler, not kill him. It's not just that financial aid has poured in: Everything from a widow's $5 money order to an astounding offer, from an anonymous donor, of at least $35,000 toward Kyler's treatment.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE SHE got sick, Hannah Max was many things: stellar math and biology student, passionate horse rider, lover of sushi. Since her diagnosis with Stage IV, high-risk neuroblastoma - a rare and deadly childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system - the 13-year-old is now a medical trailblazer, too. And you, Daily News readers, are partially responsible for that. So thank you for what you've done, not just for Hannah but for other children in desperate need of cancer care in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 19, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patricia Gregory Brophy, 55, of Aston, a nurse-practitioner who cared for critically ill children, died Feb. 12 of colon cancer at her home. Mrs. Brophy earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from Thomas Jefferson University after her two children were in school. She decided to become an oncology nurse when one of her daughter's classmates died of cancer, her husband, Robert, said. She joined the staff of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when she graduated in 1985. After earning a master's degree in nursing at Widener University, Mrs. Brophy was a clinical nurse specialist and then an oncology nurse-practitioner at Children's Hospital.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day last summer, researchers John Maris and Yael Mosse waited eagerly for e-mail from a 24-year-old woman named Anna O'Connor - or her father, who was closely involved in her fight against a rare cancer. Since her diagnosis at 17, Anna had kept going by trying every treatment she could. One had left her so radioactive that she had to spend two weeks in isolation in a hospital room covered in plastic. Her cancer continued to spread. Now she was the first person who stood to gain from an enormous gamble that Maris started taking 20 years ago at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, betting that genes would offer hope for this disease, called neuroblastoma.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Saying that the health of this Ocean County community's residents outweighed its fear that a water source would be depleted, New Jersey-American Water Company has withdrawn its complaint to the state over another water company's new well. The decision allays concerns among residents that United Water-Toms River would not be able to pump 1.4 million gallons per day from the recently completed Well 45 and would have to rely on two wells that once contained contaminants many believe responsible for a rash of childhood cancers.
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NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE SHE got sick, Hannah Max was many things: stellar math and biology student, passionate horse rider, lover of sushi. Since her diagnosis with Stage IV, high-risk neuroblastoma - a rare and deadly childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system - the 13-year-old is now a medical trailblazer, too. And you, Daily News readers, are partially responsible for that. So thank you for what you've done, not just for Hannah but for other children in desperate need of cancer care in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new treatment for the deadly children's cancer neuroblastoma dramatically improves survival and has become part of the standard course of care even before results were published. The study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and other top pediatric hospitals represents the first major improvement in survival for high-risk neuroblastoma in more than a decade, and the techniques involved might be adapted to other cancers such as melanoma. The approach involves boosting the child's immune system and helping it target cancer cells.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF I EVER doubted the power of the press to coax the high and mighty into doing right by the desperate and vulnerable, the story of 12-year-old Hannah Max is a reminder of its mighty force. Though a certain Dutch insurance company begs to differ. For months, the family and friends of Hannah, who has been fighting neuroblastoma - a rare, terrible form of childhood cancer - faced the impossible task of raising $400,000 to pay for treatment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Following a blitz of media stories on both sides of the Atlantic - Hannah lives in Rotterdam, Netherlands, where the latest neuroblastoma therapy is unavailable - her balky Dutch insurer, IZA, had a change of heart.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day last summer, researchers John Maris and Yael Mosse waited eagerly for e-mail from a 24-year-old woman named Anna O'Connor - or her father, who was closely involved in her fight against a rare cancer. Since her diagnosis at 17, Anna had kept going by trying every treatment she could. One had left her so radioactive that she had to spend two weeks in isolation in a hospital room covered in plastic. Her cancer continued to spread. Now she was the first person who stood to gain from an enormous gamble that Maris started taking 20 years ago at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, betting that genes would offer hope for this disease, called neuroblastoma.
NEWS
December 10, 2009 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN YOUR little boy is fighting a brutal form of cancer, the last thing you want is to expose his frail health to anything viral. Last week, when Paul and Maria VanNocker let me tell of their son Kyler's battle to receive a potentially life-saving treatment, his story went viral. This virus could save Kyler, not kill him. It's not just that financial aid has poured in: Everything from a widow's $5 money order to an astounding offer, from an anonymous donor, of at least $35,000 toward Kyler's treatment.
NEWS
December 2, 2009 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
LOOKING at Kyler VanNocker, whose fifth birthday was Monday, it's impossible to fathom that he could die from the disease he's battling. He's bright-eyed and energetic as he tears around the house he shares in Edgewater Park, N.J., with his parents, Paul and Maria, and siblings Kaden, 6, and Anelise, 3. He's just as active at pre-school, where he's learning his numbers and the alphabet. But the truth is, Kyler has neuroblastoma, a rare and deadly form of childhood cancer that attacks the nervous system, creating tumors throughout the body.
NEWS
July 29, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Maris has spent more than 20 years trying to understand why some children get an often-fatal cancer called neuroblastoma. There was no obvious environmental factor, and a genetic variation seemed to be involved. But how to find it? Then, he and his colleagues at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia got the chance to try something that would have been unimaginable just a few years earlier: Scan the DNA of hundreds of children stricken with the disease and compare it with DNA from thousands of healthy children in a control group.
NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using DNA samples donated by thousands of patients at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, doctors have found a lead in their hunt for the causes of neuroblastoma, the baffling cancer that killed Alex of Alex's Lemonade Stand at age 8. "Until this study, we had no clue why one child gets this and not another," said the hospital's John Maris, who led the work and was Alex's oncologist. Like Alex Scott, many children who get neuroblastoma are treated with a grueling course of chemotherapy, radiation and stem-cell transplants.
NEWS
February 19, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patricia Gregory Brophy, 55, of Aston, a nurse-practitioner who cared for critically ill children, died Feb. 12 of colon cancer at her home. Mrs. Brophy earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from Thomas Jefferson University after her two children were in school. She decided to become an oncology nurse when one of her daughter's classmates died of cancer, her husband, Robert, said. She joined the staff of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia when she graduated in 1985. After earning a master's degree in nursing at Widener University, Mrs. Brophy was a clinical nurse specialist and then an oncology nurse-practitioner at Children's Hospital.
NEWS
June 11, 2006 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lemonade was flowing, and so was the spirit of giving yesterday at the "home" lemonade stand of a Main Line girl who in her too-short life started what has become a nationwide fight against childhood cancer. More than 1,000 "Alex's Lemonade Stands" were being held nationwide over the weekend to fund research to cure the diseases that kill about 2,300 children in the United States annually. The parents of Alex Scott, the girl who started it all six years ago with a single front-yard lemonade stand, said yesterday's event at the Penn Wynne Elementary School in Wynnewood was an uplifting testament to their daughter, who lost her own fight against childhood cancer two years ago at age 8. "I wish she was here to enjoy it more than anything," said Liz Scott, who with her husband, Jay, founded the Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation.
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