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Neurologist

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SPORTS
May 22, 2000 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today is D day for Flyers center Eric Lindros. A meeting in Chicago with neurologist James Kelly will have a great impact on whether Lindros, recovering from a concussion, will play again this spring. Kelly will administer another neuropsychological baseline test to determine if Lindros' results are close to what his test score was last fall, when he was healthy. "I feel really good, and I feel confident going into this test," Lindros said last night from his South Jersey home.
NEWS
May 6, 2012 | By Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Stress, family medical history or possibly even poison led to the death of Vladimir Lenin, contradicting a popular theory that a sexually transmitted disease debilitated the former Soviet Union leader, a UCLA neurologist said Friday. Dr. Harry Vinters and Russian historian Lev Lurie reviewed Lenin's records Friday for an annual University of Maryland School of Medicine conference that examines the death of famous figures. The conference is held yearly at the school, where researchers in the past have reexamined the diagnoses of figures including King Tut, Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. Wilson, 97, a neurologist and psychiatrist, died Sunday, April 27, of cardiopulmonary arrest at his home in Wynnewood. Born in Philadelphia, Dr. Wilson graduated from William Penn Charter School, Princeton University in 1938, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine four years later. He interned at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia General Hospital. From 1943 to 1947, he was a Navy flight surgeon deployed to the South Pacific.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1600s, philosopher Ren? Descartes proposed what has come to be called "mind-body dualism," the idea that the mind and body are separate. His theory was hugely influential and still permeates the way many of us in the West think about ourselves. Oliver Sacks, the well-known neurologist and author (Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat), hopes this will be the century when Descartes' dualism finally falls by the wayside and a worldview more in line with one of his contemporaries gains dominance.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
B. Franklin Diamond, 69, of Rydal, a neurologist, died of a stroke Tuesday, May 17, at Abington Memorial Hospital, where he had established the first accredited Acute Care Stroke Center in Pennsylvania. Dr. Diamond, who established the center in 1998, had recently developed, with the Montgomery County Second Alarmers Rescue Squad, an innovative stroke protocol. The protocol was used when the rescue squad arrived at Dr. Diamond's home. It assures that stroke patients receive immediate treatment when they reach the hospital.
SPORTS
November 3, 2010 | By LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson said he saw independent neurologist Dr. William Welch yesterday and that he will practice today. Jackson did not say whether Welch gave him final clearance to play Sunday against the Colts. In fact, he said he is still "taking it day by day" as he recovers from a concussion suffered Oct. 17 against the Falcons. Jackson, speaking on Comcast SportsNet's "Daily News Live," said he was ready to "start off fresh. " He said his violent collision with the Falcons' Dunta Robinson wasn't so much of a trauma to his head as a "whiplash-type injury" to his shoulders and neck.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
In June, the National Assembly of Ecuador gave Donald Silberberg, an emeritus professor of neurology at the University Pennsylvania medical school, its highest scientific award, the first such honor for an American. The Vicente Rocafuerte medal was given in recognition of Silberberg's efforts over two decades to enhance medical education and improve patient care for neurological and psychiatric conditions in Ecuador as well as around the world. "I was honored and really pleased," Silberberg said in his office recently.
SPORTS
July 27, 2000 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flyers center Eric Lindros said yesterday that he may not be ready to play hockey - for any team - until three or four months into next season. "We have to see what the doctor says, but that might be something that I have to look at," Lindros said from his summer cottage outside Toronto. Those familiar with his situation said Lindros may be advised by Chicago-based neurologist James Kelly to stay off the ice and away from contact until December or January. Lindros has suffered six concussions during his career, including four in a five-month span last season.
SPORTS
October 12, 1999 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
On the day Dallas Cowboys receiver Michael Irvin gingerly walked out of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital wearing green hospital scrubs and an immobilizing upper body/neck brace, a Philadelphia neurologist publicly urged the NFL to better enforce its rules governing dangerous hits. Irvin had regained full use of his motor functions by yesterday morning after a play in Sunday's game against the Eagles left him with swelling in two places of his spinal cord near the base of the skull.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dead man appears to walk through an Egyptian tomb in one of Sami Khella's recent paintings, while in the background, a female figure seems to squat, about to give birth. "Life continues," Khella says, interpreting the large oil painting hanging in his Gladwyne studio. The painting will be shown from Oct. 1 to 25 at Episcopal Academy in Merion, along with 30 other recent Khella works. Khella, 49, a diminutive man who emigrated from Egypt 40 years ago, is like a variation of the cat: Instead of nine lives, he has two, and they complement each other.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Besides spending his career as a pediatric neurologist, James E. Wark often gave evenings to the Russian writers Anton Chekhov and Alexander Pushkin. Though their works are well known in English, his interest was in translating some of them from the Russian himself, said his wife, Soryl Angel. Though he had visited Siberia on a brief medical assignment years ago, she said, Dr. Wark tutored himself in Russian vocabulary and grammar through evening classes at Main Line School Night.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Dana Kelley recalls the exact moment when her neurologist suggested she try medical marijuana. The retired Army Intelligence linguist said it caused her emotional upheaval and led her to question her willingness to continue living in constant pain. Kelley's neck and back were severely fractured in a car crash three years ago in her hometown of Pennsville, Salem County. She underwent five surgeries, including a fusion of a large part of her spinal cord, and was prescribed morphine and opiates.
NEWS
November 29, 2015 | By Michael Rubenstein, For The Inquirer
University of Pennsylvania neurologist Michael Rubenstein has been helping patients in rural Tanzania since he first went to the Foundation for African Medicine and Education (FAME) clinic there with his family in 2010. Now, he takes neurology residents and fellows twice a year to treat patients, many of whom have epilepsy. He chronicles their work on his blog . Here is the story of one of his young patients: I met Roza nearly a year ago by video on the Internet. She was a 14-year-old girl brought to FAME two months after she fell out of a tree and later began to have abnormal movements and then lost the ability to walk or talk.
SPORTS
November 25, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
SAM BRADFORD has been cleared by an independent neurologist, the Eagles said, meaning he has completed the NFL concussion protocol, but Bradford was just a partial participant in Monday's practice, the only full-scale workout before the Thanksgiving game at Detroit. So it seems likely Mark Sanchez will again quarterback the Birds against the Lions; offensive tackle Lane Johnson said that was his expectation. The two other concussed Eagles, running back Ryan Mathews and tight end Zach Ertz, are expected to sit, as well.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
A 60-year-old smoker came to my office complaining of pain in his right leg for the last five years. He described it as "tightness" in the front of his thigh that would come on after walking five blocks or less. When he stopped to rest, the pain went away in about a minute, but over time it had been gradually increasing in severity. There was no pain or discomfort in either foot or lower leg, nor in the left thigh. He was taking a statin medication to lower his cholesterol, but nothing else.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. Wilson, 97, a neurologist and psychiatrist, died Sunday, April 27, of cardiopulmonary arrest at his home in Wynnewood. Born in Philadelphia, Dr. Wilson graduated from William Penn Charter School, Princeton University in 1938, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine four years later. He interned at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia General Hospital. From 1943 to 1947, he was a Navy flight surgeon deployed to the South Pacific.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - A University of Pittsburgh medical researcher accused of poisoning his neurologist wife with a supplement she apparently thought would help them have a baby was arrested yesterday in West Virginia, authorities said. Dr. Robert Ferrante laced an energy supplement with cyanide and gave it to Dr. Autumn Klein, a neurologist at the university's medical school, hours after they exchanged text messages about how the supplement could help them conceive, according to a police complaint unsealed yesterday.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013 | BY PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Staff Writer pdomo@aol.com
NEW ORLEANS - The NFL is about to take another significant step toward better in-game diagnosis of concussions. Jeff Pash, the league's general counsel, said at a news conference Thursday the league will have independent neurological consultants on the sideline during games starting next season. This season, the league put a certified trainer up in the booth during games to help with concussion diagnosis. It also installed replay monitors on the sideline for use by team training and medical staffs to review injuries.
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