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New Age

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Opinions run deep and divergent about "New Age" or "Whole Earth" music. Critics of this studied folk-classical-jazz blend lump it all together as "mood music for the 1980s," or "audio valium. " Supporters of this musical amalgam celebrate its humanistic bent, its ability not only to entertain, but also to soothe away the worries of the everyday world. To their thinking, new age music is more lyrical than a poem by Browning, as organic as tofu, as spiritual as Zen meditation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1987 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
"All new-age artists will claim to be 'not really new-age.' " - Musician magazine's "fearless predictions" for 1987 No one likes it, but there it is: new-age. Paul Winter, the saxophonist who's been making mellow for 25 years, is new- age. So's a Swiss harp player by the name of Andreas Vollenweider. And so is Jean-Michel Jarre - French synthesizer whiz and son of film composer Maurice Jarre - even though Jean-Michel's electronic excursions predate the term "new-age. " And so, definitely, is Windham Hill Records, the little company that guitarist William Ackerman built in his Palo Alto, Calif.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
The taped music was all soft pings and pongs; the air inside the Garland of Letters bookstore was sweet with incense. Sheila Reynolds, who says she's a psychic, and Donna Proszynski were discussing Ralph Waldo Emerson's transcendental philosophy when a stranger approached to ask what drew them to the literature at Philadelphia's premier new-age bookshop. "I think the message of the new age is that we're all special," said Proszynski, who owns a similar bookstore in New Hope.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
AS THE DEBATE over the rescue - or ruin - of Social Security continues to rage, one idea has emerged that actually has some merit. Republican Sen. Church Hagel is recommending that the retirement age when people can start collecting full Social Security benefits be raised from 67 to 68 starting in the year 2023. Democrats and others have jumped on the suggestion, especially because Hagel has tied his suggestion to establishing private accounts. But setting aside that idea, raising the age of retirement is probably long overdue.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just a few years ago, Chester County wasn't ready for the New Age ideas of Hemitra Crecraft and Sue King. Ideas like New Age dance parties, complete with a gem elixir bar. "We called it Barefoot Boogie," Crecraft said. "It was a complete bomb. " And Goddess Gatherings, "celebrations in nature of the great goddesses. " "That was way ahead of its time too," Crecraft said. Then the two Main Line women stumbled onto Indian sweat lodge ceremonies. Finally, they had something people were willing to pay for. Their classes on crystal healing, flower essences and the power of color also were hits.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
For Pat Fenske and millions of other people across the globe, "hell" ended yesterday - and the Harmonic Convergence began. Shortly before dawn, Fenske and more than 100 other participants in the 14th annual Human Unity Conference gathered on the 27th floor of the Franklin Plaza to reflect, in part, on the ramifications of the convergence. Human Unity participants were specifically celebrating the end of hell, as predicted by the Aztecs. According to legend, Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec god of wisdom and peace, set up a calendar beginning in 843 A.D. that called for 22 periods of 52 years each - 13 periods of heaven followed by nine periods of hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
A Shout Toward Noon (Private Music ), the new album by the great guitarist Leo Kottke, takes a crucial risk: Kottke slows the pace and tone of his acoustic, mostly solo instrumentals to achieve the dreamy buzz of the so- called New Age music that is popular now. But the wonderful thing about Kottke's slight yet significant stylistic shift is that he pulls it off - he easily avoids the lulling, Muzak-like quality that infects most...
SPORTS
February 20, 1990 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Barkley turns 27 today, waking in this mountain city with only a team practice and a plane flight to Oakland ahead of him. That suits Barkley fine. The Sixers are on a mission to win over those who doubt them, and they see achieving success on their five-game road trip as a way to do it. They are a serious group right now, not one given to celebrations, birthday or otherwise. "The birthday doesn't really mean anything," Barkley said before the Sixers played the Utah Jazz last night.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Staff Writer
With California boasting more members of the American Booksellers Association than any other state, no one seemed too surprised this weekend at the crowd that attended the "Demystifying New Age Books" symposium at the ABA convention that ends here today. In fact, it was a downright helpful bunch. When one of the panelists, Halim Provo-Thompson of Atlanta's New Leaf Distributing Co., was asked about trends in new-age publishing from the standpoint of his 13-year-old wholesaling operation in the field, he began, "I don't have a crystal ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1988 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
If crystals and past-life psychic regression can improve your life, why not personal computers and VCRs? Whether it's true enlightenment or a rationalization for people to be yuppies and hippies at the same time, the new-age phenomenon is giving rise to the sale of soul-saving software for the Shirley MacLaine crowd. New-agers can buy programs such as Subli-Mac, a self-hypnosis disk that plants subliminal messages into your subconscious mind, and Alter Ego, which helps you gain insights into your life by living the life of somebody else.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Layla Jones, PHILLY.COM
Ahead of his very recent musical ascension, Armani White says he destroyed himself, deleting from public view all his music on the Internet. Then he rebuilt, working with a new team of people in hopes of rebranding himself. But not long after, he destroyed himself again and rebuilt. Destroy. Rebuild. Destroy. Despite it all - or maybe because of it - the New-Age black nerd rapper from West Philadelphia is quickly making a name for himself with his rapid-fire lyrical flow. Armani screams complexity and contradiction.
REAL_ESTATE
May 24, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I used to think that the tiny-house movement had something to do with building smaller homes that more people could afford. Then I came across an article in Forbes by Erin Carlyle that talked about the upscale nature of tiny houses, with so many amenities per square foot - even a tiny hot tub - that you wonder how people can fit inside. One example was an $82,000, 348.5-square-footer "equipped with one bedroom, a bathroom and a kitchen/living room with a butcher-block countertop that doubles as a desk," Carlyle wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Middle Ages, that yawning centuries-wide gap between HBO's Rome and Showtime's The Borgias , has become all the rage on TV, what with all the sword, sorcery, and dragon action on Game of Thrones , Once Upon a Time , and Merlin . But for Ken Follett, the era is less about sword and sorcery than mortar and thistle. Known for his spy thrillers, Follett took on the Dark Ages with his 1989 Pillars of the Earth (19.6 million copies sold worldwide), a 938-page epic set in the 12th century that chronicled the construction of an English Gothic cathedral in the fictional town of Kingsbridge.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Eric Newton is senior adviser to the president at the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation in Miami. The digital age is changing almost everything about journalism - who a journalist is, what a story is, which media should provide news when and where people want it, and how we engage with communities. The only thing that isn't changing is the why of journalism. We still need good, honest, independent reporting - the fair, accurate, contextual search for truth - to run our communities and our lives.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | Kelly McQuain is a writer and professor at Community College of Philadelphia
When I was a kid in the 1970s, my favorite comics were Famous First Editions, reprints of the original appearances of Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. These comics not only took me to heroic worlds of the imagination, but they also transported me to the boyhood of my father. I imagined him, like me, poring over early adventures of Batman and Robin. We bonded over comics the way other fathers and sons did over baseball.   These were stories from comics' Golden Age, a period that began in 1939 with the debut of Superman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2012 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, mccutch@phillynews.com 215-854-5991
REMEMBER THE old song about matchmakers making matches? Finding finds? Catching catches? If, this Valentine's Day, you find yourself single, seeking - and thinking about hiring someone to set you up - forget those lyrics. Forget about old-world matchmakers. Things have changed a lot since that guy fiddled on a roof. Today's paid-for couple-creators are no longer simple setter-uppers. They're full-service pros with the savvy of Bravo's "Millionaire Matchmaker" Patti Stanger and the cunning of VH1's "Tough Love" host Steve Ward.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
TBILISI, Georgia - The rattling olive Audi A4 with two middle-aged smugglers attracted little attention as it slithered through this former Soviet republic one morning in February, speeding toward the Turkish border. In the trunk, the smugglers carried a silver case filled with iridium-192. They nurtured vague grand plans to sell the radioactive material to a Muslim buyer for $5 million. Such a black-market sale could have but one likely purpose - construction of a so-called dirty bomb.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  At NewAge Industries, what goes on under the roof has been the priority at the plastic-tubing manufacturer for 57 years. On Wednesday, all attention will be on the roof itself. There, a one-megawatt solar system consisting of 4,082 panels - a monster in terms of rooftop photovoltaic arrays and believed to be the biggest of its kind in Bucks County - will be the toast of local and state dignitaries, green-business advocates, and NewAge's 100 employees. For a plant that uses two megawatts of power a year to churn out tubing with widespread applicability - from pharmaceutical laboratories to McDonald's milk-shake machines - the solar project represents a serious cost-savings opportunity.
NEWS
May 1, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I read in the paper that nowadays, the companies that take school pictures will retouch the photos to fix the kids' cowlicks, missing front teeth, and freckles. In my view, this is not progress. Reportedly, 10 percent of parents request such retouching. The other 90 percent love their children. Apparently, some parents like to see their children as they should be, instead of how they are. Or maybe they're Photoshopaholics. I can't think of a better message a parent can send a child than, "You're almost good enough!"
NEWS
August 21, 2010 | By Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Iran is set to cross a new nuclear threshold, but it's one the Obama administration isn't worried about. On Saturday, technicians are scheduled to begin loading low-enriched uranium fuel supplied by Russia into Iran's first civilian nuclear reactor, and if all goes smoothly, the Bushehr plant could start producing electricity under U.N. monitoring late this year or early next. Bushehr embodies what the administration and many experts consider an ideal solution to the Iranian nuclear dispute: Tehran benefits from the peaceful nuclear energy to which it is entitled by international law, but the fuel comes from elsewhere, negating Iran's need to make its own via enrichment, a process that also can produce highly enriched uranium for nuclear bombs.
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