CollectionsNew Century
IN THE NEWS

New Century

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The council chamber was filled with family members and onlookers as two incumbents and a newcomer were sworn in to Township Council on Monday night. Michael L. Sanyour has been on the council for 12 years, Kathleen D. Einstein was appointed nearly 10 months ago, and Jeffrey K. Harding is a first-time member. The three running mates won four-year terms in November. Harding said he was proud to represent Moorestown and appreciated his supporters' faith in him. After the three were sworn in, the council's first official act at its reorganization meeting was to reelect Howard A. Miller as mayor and Sanyour as deputy mayor.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the night of Oct. 27, 1898, an enormous arch standing across Broad Street in Philadelphia was set ablaze with lightbulbs to celebrate the U.S. victory in the Spanish-American War. The facade of the Union League was also set aglow in the largest combined display of electrical illumination the city had ever seen. It was a chance to rejoice in Uncle Sam's emergence as a world power. But in its extravagant burning of municipal electricity - a recent convenience in the 1890s - it was also a celebration of new technology that was helping to make the Nineties gay. On the eve of the 20th century, Americans generally believed that life was getting better.
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Your favorite pan in the kitchen, the one that delivers the best results time and again, inspires a special kind of love. A love that can't be tempered by rust nor by achy arm muscles. This is an ode to the cast-iron skillet. No one remembers purchasing his first cast-iron skillet, as Ellen Brown points out in her well-researched The New Cast Iron Skillet Cookbook (Sterling Epicure). Like umbrellas, they come into our lives full of functional possibility, often well-used, patiently waiting at the ready for us to discover their indispensable place in the kitchen.
NEWS
January 28, 2001
The issues of race and race relations seem to be constantly in the news. Lately the stories have been about a fight between black and white students at George Washington High in Northeast Philadelphia; concerns of racial balance and achievement gaps in Cherry Hill schools; charges of voter disenfranchisement in Florida; and the continuing controversies in New Jersey over racial profiling. For the next few months, the Community Voices page will be asking questions about some of the political and public policy issues that drive these news stories, examining how they affect people's lives, and suggesting directions our country needs to explore on race in this new century.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | By Donald Kaul
There are two sure ways for a columnist to generate mail. The first is to imply that guns are less benign than, say, ice cream. The other is to suggest the 21st century will begin on Jan. 1, 2000. The first method generates the most mail, the second the more passionate. You don't see them walking around much during the daytime, but the woods are full of people who not only believe that the new century will not begin until the year 2001, but are willing to fight to the death (yours, not theirs)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ask Rich Rubin, producing artistic director of Quince Productions' GayFest 2013, why his theatrical extravaganza is a must-attend for audiences both LGBT and straight, and he'll tell you: He's out to upend gay theater's standard themes. "What I love about the plays in this festival is that they aren't your usual dramas about coming out to your parents or why gay people have it so hard," Rubin says. "These things are, obviously, important, but we've seen them before. " So: Have Philly audiences seen a play featuring a Long Island Jewish mother and her leather-clad doctor/slave son, as they will during playwright Paul Rudnick's The New Century (Aug.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
It happened. A weird convergence of clock and calendar the likes of which won't happen till next century. We're talking about 12:12:12 on 12-12-12. For the second time today, it happened - and the planet's still here, and the country still hasn't gone over a fiscal cliff. OK, not exactly a big event. Except for those who booked wedding chapels for the hour and date in Vegas and other cities. But this milestone does mark the end of a period with frequent numerologically curious date patterns.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
For the last five years, Jim Anthony III's golfing friends have been asking: When are you going to change your company's name? What are you going to change it to? Anthony is president of Twentieth Century Hauling and Refuse Removal on Atlantic Street in Kensington. That's a perfectly respectable company name. It has lasted through four generations of Anthonys and has been around for almost a century now. That's precisely the issue. As the 21st century looms, Anthony has been thinking that maybe the time has come to rename the family firm.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
Monday in Washington it was almost all sweetness and light for William Jefferson Clinton, who raised his right hand to become the first Democrat to begin a full second term in the White House since Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Blinking into the blinding sunlight, Clinton, 50, his left hand on the family Bible, solemnly recited the 35 words spoken by every president since George Washington Then it was over. The easiest part was behind him. He smiled his way through the chorus of cheers from the throats of his audience of nearly 250,000.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | By John C. Morgan
"I wouldn't walk around the block to see the world blow up. " Sitting there in his Walden Pond cabin in Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau spoke these words to explain why he went off to "live deep and suck all the marrow of life. " For him, as for me, life is not such much what happens where there is a lot of activity (or television cameras) as what happens within myself and among those who share my tiny corner of the universe. Perhaps this is the reason so many of us spent our evenings at home alone or with family or friends, waiting for the year 2000 to dawn.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Your favorite pan in the kitchen, the one that delivers the best results time and again, inspires a special kind of love. A love that can't be tempered by rust nor by achy arm muscles. This is an ode to the cast-iron skillet. No one remembers purchasing his first cast-iron skillet, as Ellen Brown points out in her well-researched The New Cast Iron Skillet Cookbook (Sterling Epicure). Like umbrellas, they come into our lives full of functional possibility, often well-used, patiently waiting at the ready for us to discover their indispensable place in the kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ask Rich Rubin, producing artistic director of Quince Productions' GayFest 2013, why his theatrical extravaganza is a must-attend for audiences both LGBT and straight, and he'll tell you: He's out to upend gay theater's standard themes. "What I love about the plays in this festival is that they aren't your usual dramas about coming out to your parents or why gay people have it so hard," Rubin says. "These things are, obviously, important, but we've seen them before. " So: Have Philly audiences seen a play featuring a Long Island Jewish mother and her leather-clad doctor/slave son, as they will during playwright Paul Rudnick's The New Century (Aug.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Music Critic
Two years after mounting an illuminated model of the Eiffel Tower and a monthlong run of 145 performances, exhibitions, lectures, screenings, and other events - all capped by a huge South Broad street fair - the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts returns. While it's smaller and less overwhelming, intriguing collaborations and ubiquitous venues will nevertheless still define PIFA, which begins March 28. And, yes, a South Broad street fair will again mark the end, on April 27. This time the festival will be loosely organized around the theme "If you had a time machine.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
It happened. A weird convergence of clock and calendar the likes of which won't happen till next century. We're talking about 12:12:12 on 12-12-12. For the second time today, it happened - and the planet's still here, and the country still hasn't gone over a fiscal cliff. OK, not exactly a big event. Except for those who booked wedding chapels for the hour and date in Vegas and other cities. But this milestone does mark the end of a period with frequent numerologically curious date patterns.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world's most important married couple, Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith , injected a dose of fiber into their blanket denial that they are breaking up with a brazen, bald-faced public relations move: They spent Wednesday visiting shops - on foot and in full view of John and Jane Q. Public - all around Malibu, Calif. They had breakfast at an outdoor cafe, bought craft and arts supplies for amateur painter Jada, lovingly lingered in front of boutique windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
AMANDA HESSER had her doubts. Six years ago, when the sprightly New York Times food columnist, author and cofounder of food52.com signed on to distill 150 years of Times recipes into one cookbook, she wasn't sure she was up to the task. The breadth of the project intimidated even this seasoned writer. "I worried about doing a good job," she said. "The time period was so vast. I felt I needed some guidance. " Hesser, who was food editor of the Sunday magazine when she left the Times for digital ventures in 2008, put out a call to readers to send her their crumpled, stained, most-loved recipes.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Elisa Lala INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Broad and Berks Streets in North Philadelphia, the 36,000-square-foot Baptist Temple, a once-upon-a-time Romanesque church now owned by Temple University, stands like a mysterious, lifeless elephant. At a ribbon-cutting April 14, the 119-year-old building will shake off its dust and take in a breath of new air. Through a $30 million renovation funded partly by the state, the building's innards have been ripped out and refurbished, and its core has been transformed into a grand multipurpose center to be used by the university and community for concerts, presentations, and other performances.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2007 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
New Century Financial Corp., the nation's second-biggest subprime lender, said yesterday that it did not have the cash to pay creditors who were demanding their money, increasing speculation the company would go bankrupt. The mortgage company's stock did not trade yesterday, as the New York Stock Exchange decided whether to keep listing its securities in light of the liquidity problems. Shares of the Irvine, Calif., company are down 90 percent in 2007. They closed Friday at $3.21.
LIVING
September 1, 2006 | By Marty Ross FOR THE INQUIRER
Ellen Ogden didn't want to look out her living room windows at a bare stretch of lawn, so she designed the prettiest garden she could think of: A vegetable garden. Ogden is cofounder of Cook's Garden (www.cooksgarden.com), a mail-order business specializing in salad greens. But both her catalog and her garden offer much more than just lettuce: She has strawberries, flowers, and lots of fresh herbs. A neat garden, planted with straight rows of vegetables, is a thing of beauty, Ogden says.
NEWS
December 8, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pilotless personal planes. Behemoth airliners. Planes with seats in the wings. That's what today's aviation engineers see when they look in their crystal balls, so fasten your seat belts. Progress in aviation has changed direction, said aviation historian Thomas Crouch, a curator at the Smithsonian Institution. No longer is it necessarily about sleek, supersonic planes such as the Concorde, which died last month. "From the 1960s and '70s, progress was redefined," Crouch said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|