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LIVING
November 16, 2000 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who goes through a revolving door first - the host or the visitor? Is it appropriate to tell a business associate that his fly is open? And how exactly do you eat that roll? These age-old puzzlers of business etiquette are as important as ever, even in the New Economy - but fewer and fewer of us, whether computer whizzes or MBA hotshots, know the answers. Plainly put, gentle reader, the workforce of the New Economy isn't minding its manners. So red-faced corporations are calling on etiquette consultants more than ever to polish up employees who may be savvy about C++, gigabytes and IPOs, but lacking in some of the finer graces.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | by RoseAnn B. Rosenthal
Our region has awakened to the realization that our economy is changing in very fundamental ways, and that our future growth and competitiveness are tied to how well we attract, secure and develop our knowledge assets. Innovation, creativity, technology excellence and an entrepreneurial attitude that is not fearful of risk are critical in environments where changes are rapid and the responses varied. In the midst of such tremendous change, it is tempting to look for security.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
NEED AN OBJECT lesson in how hard it is for an Old Economy company to try to join the New? Take a look at AT&T's struggles this week, as the company moved to transform itself - again. This time, it is splitting into four distinct parts that will try to fight more effectively with upstart competitors. Analysts said the decision was motivated by its declining stock price, as Wall Street grew restless over the company's strategy of "bundling" - providing telephone and Internet services through cable television connections in the home.
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Once upon a time, the goal of an aspiring master of the universe with a Wharton MBA was an office at one of New York City's financial empires. No more. Holders of the coveted master's in business administration now depart Philadelphia for technology and Internet jobs in places such as Boston, Seattle, San Jose and Austin. If the stock options look good enough, they even bail without the degree. When they leave, they take a slice of the future with them. That isn't good for Philadelphia or the region.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | by Michael Hinkelman , Daily News Staff Writer
IN SAN FRANCISCO and other frontiers of the New Economy, Internet entrepreneurs have a certain swagger. "We're all cowboys out here," said Nat Goldhaber, chief executive of Cybergold, a shopping e-tailer that racked up Oakland, Calif.'s, first Internet IPO in September. "You walk by a waiter in a restaurant and you know that person could be a millionaire next week because he's probably writing code part time," Goldhaber said. With waiters like that, it's no surprise that the Bay Area is creating a lot of buzz these days.
NEWS
May 24, 2000
Back in the 1800s, while New York, Boston and Baltimore were enjoying the energy benefits of gas, Philadelphia was still in the dark ages. City government, according to the massively detailed history book "Philadelphia," was too suspicious of the new technology. It wasn't until Samuel V. Merrick, an advocate for gas lighting, was elected to City Council and pushed the issue that a gas plant was built along the Schuylkill River.Philadelphia's streets were finally lit by the warm light of gas. History once again is repeating itself, with New York, Boston, San Jose and other cities enjoying a new technology - the Internet.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | By Ken Moritsugu, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An education system that is not keeping pace with technological advances may be the Achilles' heel of America's "new economy," leaders from academia, business and government warned yesterday at a White House conference chaired by President Clinton. Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft, and Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan led authorities who said that failure to improve the education of all Americans threatened to create a computer-illiterate underclass. "I would suggest that that remains our greatest challenge in the coming years," said Abby Joseph Cohen, the stock market guru who is a managing director of Goldman, Sachs & Co. Clinton welcomed the message, which came one day after his "national call to action" to close "the digital divide" - a catchphrase describing the gap between people with access to the Internet world and those without it. Expanding education as the means for closing the gap between haves and have-nots is among the most consistent themes of Clinton's presidency.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tech stocks - especially those of small companies - are like a cowlick. They can be pushed down, but each time they pop back more prominent than before. They powered the Nasdaq composite index over 5,000 last week for the first time. Although tech stocks drove Nasdaq to its fourth-worst point drop yesterday, they are nonetheless making reluctant believers out of investors still clutching to old-economy holdings that are, as one money manager scoffed, "so 1990s. " And tech stocks are the reason why some market researchers and analysts predict that the Nasdaq will surpass the Dow Jones Industrial Average in value.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2001 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Stalwart companies of the "old economy" may be getting the better of their "new economy" counterparts as the nation's economic slowdown drags on. As orders for semiconductors and telecommunications equipment plunge, high-tech companies brace for deeper trouble. Meanwhile, more traditional manufacturers such as appliance-maker Whirlpool Corp. appear poised to recover. Manufacturing output in traditional industries edged up 0.2 percent last month, the first gain since the economy began slowing last September, the Federal Reserve reported last week.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2000 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
THE CORNER of Judson and Norris streets had been left behind by the New Economy - until Sister Mary Scullion, founder and director of Project H.O.M.E., got working on it. Scullion has raised $2 million to build a three-story technology learning center on a vacant lot on the southwest corner of Judson and Norris as part of her 10-year effort to revitalize this blighted section of North Central Philadelphia. The tech center will provide neighborhood children with the opportunity to gain the same technological skills as children from more affluent areas.
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NEWS
September 4, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Are we seeing a comeback of movements for workers' rights and a turn toward a new militancy on behalf of wage-earners? Suggesting this is not the same as a romantic optimism that foresees an instant union revival. What's actually happening is more interesting: Unions, workers, and others who believe that too many Americans receive low wages are finding new ways to address long-standing grievances. The steadily declining share of our economy that goes to wages is one of those things.
NEWS
September 5, 2011
By Judith Stein In his speech on jobs Thursday, President Obama will offer tax credits for new hiring, extension of the payroll tax cut, and other small items, his aides hinted. These measure may be helpful at the margins, but the only way they, and much needed larger ones, will get people's attention is if they are attached to a narrative that makes jobs the centerpiece of a new economy that produces more of the goods that Americans consume. In 2009, the president seemed to agree when he told CNN, "We can't go back to the era where the Chinese or the Germans or other countries just are selling everything to us, we're taking out a bunch of credit card debt or home equity loans, but we're not selling anything to them.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2011
An unusual small-business movement took root in Philadelphia 10 years ago, created by a woman known more at the time for her inventiveness in the kitchen. Restaurateur Judy Wicks, then owner of White Dog Cafe, an organic eatery in West Philadelphia, wanted to inspire a new economy - one centered on businesses like hers that valued social and environmental impact as well as profit. What was Wicks' ambition a decade ago is now not only a reality, but also a growing business sector and an increasingly influential economic force in the region.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: As the economy struggles to find new footing, this occasional series will focus on areas of emerging demand for workers and the forces behind it. By the time developer Michael Pestronk closed on the deal to buy the old Goldtex textiles factory near 12th and Callowhill Streets, vandals had stripped out all the copper pipes and plenty of Philadelphia's graffiti "artists" had signed their names on the walls. With buckled floors, pigeon poop, and missing windows, it was a mess.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Stephen Jiwanmall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter challenged college students to be more informed about the city's current economic challenges and to stay in the city when they get their diplomas, as he kicked off the 2010 Voter Awareness Initiative at La Salle University Thursday night. Nutter said that the city's budget is balanced and he credited President Obama and Congress for their work to boost the nation's economy. "The program is absolutely working," he said, adding that the city would not have been able to rebound from record-breaking deficits in the budget without the federal stimulus bill.
NEWS
October 11, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lindel Richardson smiled as she dropped a pair of shoes into her shopping cart. They were new, the brand was Unisa, and they cost all of $3.99. Elsewhere at the Goodwill store in Pennsauken, she found a sweatjacket for $3.99, and a linen skirt for $1.99. "Isn't this nice?" she said, holding it up. "I can wear this to church. " Richardson, of Lindenwold, is paying college tuition for herself and her son, and like so many others, she's hoping to stretch fewer dollars farther these days.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2007 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To sharpen its message, the local branch of the Pennsylvania Economy League - which focuses mainly on on the southeastern part of the state - is changing its name to the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia. The new name acknowledges the reality that the region includes South Jersey and Delaware in addition to Southeastern Pennsylvania, said Steven T. Wray, executive director. The group also has a new Web site, www.economyleague.org. This is Wray's first major administrative move since replacing David Thornburgh in June.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
The Bush administration is accepting public comments through November on its latest fuel-saving proposal for minivans, trucks and sports utility vehicles. Here's one: You've got to be kidding. With gas prices averaging $2.62 a gallon nationally, the best the Department of Transportation could muster Tuesday was a new fuel-economy rule saving less than a month's worth of gas over 15 years. Consumers spending $50 for a fill-up need more help than that. So does the nation, whose economy and national security hinge on the supply and price of oil. A well-crafted fuel-economy rule could have set the United States on a path toward oil conservation.
NEWS
June 8, 2005
TUCKED IN Gov. Rendell's $23.8 billion 2005-2006 budget proposal, which is - if not already - about to get a going over by legislators during budget negotiations, is an initiative that can have a positive impact on the state's workers. Called "Job Ready Pennsylvania," the modestly priced plan ($101 million) seeks to improve the training and education of the state's workers to create a skilled work force. They must become better educated and skillful in order to land jobs here that have long-term economic growth.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey's economy has outperformed all but three states in job growth in the last year and continues to have a lower unemployment rate than the national average. But any recovery in the state in the new year will not be as strong as that in the rest of the nation, according to several regional economists. "That outperformance will disappear as we go through 2004," said Joel Naroff, chief economist for Commerce Bank. "When you don't grow as much, you don't fall as hard, and it's easier to bounce back.
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