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NEWS
October 29, 1988 | By Jim Gladstone, Special to The Inquirer
The "Woof! Woof!" cheers that have been the rage at recent R&B concerts gave way to yelps of puppy love last night as winsome quintet New Edition topped a triple bill that included former group member Bobby Brown and snazzy newcomer Al B. Sure. From the pink billows of cotton candy sold in the aisles of the Spectrum to the Bugs Bunny cartoons shown before starting time, the program seemed perfectly designed to please the young, squeaky-clean teenage crowd. But then the music started.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
A new edition, the first since the revision of 1965, has been published by Sanford Durst. It includes a supplement on the 12 new varieties discovered since 1965, an expanded bibliography and an introduction by Dennis Loring. The book deals exclusively with large cents and includes a year-by-year discussion of the coins struck between 1794 and 1814 and 51 full pages of photographs of the coins. The book is being sold in coin shops at $50, or may be ordered through Durst Publications, 29-28 41st Ave., Long Island City, N.Y. 11101.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | By Pete Goldman, FOR THE INQUIRER
New Edition turned the CoreStates Center inside out Sunday night. And the arena's near-capacity crowd didn't do too badly, either, with fans on their feet, matching the reunited R & B sextet lyric for lyric, for the length of its set. Following two cuts from their recent album Home Again, Bobby Brown, Ralph Tresvant, Johnny Gill, Ronnie DeVoe, Michael Bivins and Ricky Bell got nostalgic with "Count Me Out" and a routine that featured the classic...
NEWS
May 29, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After nearly two years, William "Pete" Dorwart, a retired clinical chemist turned music publisher, has completed his biggest project: a new edition of the full score of Gypsy Baron. The Main Line Opera Guild will try out the 375-page full score with the performance of Johann Strauss' work Friday and next Sunday at Haverford College. Dorwart's previous undertakings include 11 Gilbert and Sullivan shows and an edition of The Merry Widow, which has been used by the Metropolitan Opera for three seasons.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Karin Braedt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a long-awaited night for the township. Mayor William Park Jr., Commissioners Charles DiPietropolo and Nicho- las Laurito, and others gathered on MacArthur Boulevard for the opening of a new library. After Haddon Township commissioners cut the ribbon July 30 for the newest branch of the Camden County Library, residents were allowed to tour it. The $4 million facility was funded jointly by the township and the county. The library is named in honor of the late William G. Rohrer, the township's first mayor.
SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
A local rider, Terry Rudd of Kennett Square, turned in a popular triumph last night when she reined P.S. Gazpacho over a jump-off course to win the $15,000 Open Jumper Stake in the finale to the 94th annual Devon Horse Show. The first prize in this competition was worth $4,000 to the horse's owners, Esther and Paul Gansky of Willistown. THE RESULTS $350 single roadster championship, amateur to drive: 1, Autobahn, Ken Wheeler; 2, Mr. Skye, John Sheridan; 3, The Black Horse, Phil Austin.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when other newspapers are cutting back, the Philadelphia Daily News will launch an ambitious new weekend edition, it was announced Tuesday. The new edition, which will supplant the Saturday edition of the paper, will target a younger audience but retain the tabloid's emphasis on sports, features, and gossip, according to Daily News Editor Michael Days. "It will be sort of like the Daily News on steroids," Days said. "We want to keep it light, keep it fun, and keep it interesting.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Once modern performers and listeners progress beyond the Bach and Handel zone of the baroque period, they must decide how much to take the scores at their word. Composing was an everyday activity in the 18th century, much of the music written to be heard only once. So, is Tempesta di Mare's scholarly reevaluation of Georg Telemann's 1765 secular cantata Ino , premiered this weekend in its season-closing concerts, a significant event in the history of a significant piece? Yes, but not necessarily because listeners were closer to the notes Telemann put on paper.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | by Dawn S. Onley, Daily News Staff Writer
So far, this has been a fine summer for Philadelphia's homegrown music. Not only has DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince's "Summertime" become a radio (and MTV) staple, but Boyz II Men, a young Philadelphia group, has just seen its debut album hit No. 5 this week on Billboard's album chart. The title of the album, "Cooley High Harmony," was taken from the 1970s film "Cooley High" about the lives of black high school students. In addition to the movie tune, "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday," the album features the autobiographical hit (now No. 13 on the charts)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
A new breed of post-rap rhythm and blues has exploded in the past six months. And no one represents the form more successfully than Bobby Brown, a nominee in last night's American Music Awards, proud possessor of the No. 1 album in America, and a very hot ticket at the Spectrum tonight. Dovetailing tough-nosed, snappy soul music with soft rap, this new-style R& B is described by urban music authority Vince Aletti as "part buppie funk, part-B boy urban contemporary. " Also riding this up-market sound to fame and fortune are artists like Johnny Kemp, Keith Sweat, Guy and Al B. Sure!
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the full membership of New Edition decide to reconvene for a new album and summer tour, it's a reunion worth celebrating. Despite branching off onto successful solo tracks - most famously Bobby Brown, with Johnny Gill, Ralph Tresvant, and collaborations such as Bell Biv DeVoe and Heads of State (Brown, Gill, Tresvant) - the whole is always more dynamic than the parts. "Six individuals bringing six different levels of success outside of New Edition is good," Ronnie DeVoe said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a day in 1980 when the kid walked into the Cape May Bird Observatory. He'd left Cornell and wanted a job as the person who leads the Cape May Point hawk count during the fall migration. While he was at it, the kid asked if the center's director, legendary birder Pete Dunne, wanted to see his field sketches. As Dunne recalls, they filled five loose-leaf binders. And even then, they were "just magnificent. " The kid was David Allen Sibley. By now, Sibley's depictions of birds are known to pretty much every birder in the nation because they fill his field guides.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2011
LONG AGO, I went into journalism - as do many naïve young men - harboring the ridiculously stereotypical fantasy that I might someday become that hard-drinking, cigar-chomping, Mencken-esque city columnist of yesteryear. In the black-and-white newsreel of my imagination, my workday would end like this: After banging out 800 words of tough-guy prose, I would rise from my Underwood, adjust my fedora (with the press card tucked into the hat band) and slip off to the local press club. There, at a dark and smoky bar populated with rogue characters, I would order a double rye with a beer back.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
On Canaan's Side by Sebastian Barry (Viking, $24.95) The lyrical, award-winning novelist depicts Depression-era America through the eyes of Lilly Bere, a political refugee from Ireland. (Sept. 6) Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women by Melissa V. Harris-Perry (Yale, $28) The author, a professor of political science at Tulane University, explores how black women negotiate the many images society throws at them. The personal really is the political - and vice versa.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Once modern performers and listeners progress beyond the Bach and Handel zone of the baroque period, they must decide how much to take the scores at their word. Composing was an everyday activity in the 18th century, much of the music written to be heard only once. So, is Tempesta di Mare's scholarly reevaluation of Georg Telemann's 1765 secular cantata Ino , premiered this weekend in its season-closing concerts, a significant event in the history of a significant piece? Yes, but not necessarily because listeners were closer to the notes Telemann put on paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
My bad luck with headphones dates back to my beloved New Edition Candy Girl tape and my Sony Walkman. The foam on the earpiece was stripped down to the metal, and I could only hear through one side. Fast forward 20-plus years, and my headphone drama continues. I love my iPod Shuffle, but my far-from-fashionable buds always pop out of my ears. Thanks to celebrity endorsements and better technology, headphones are evolving into the latest functional fashion accessory, right behind that pretty cell-phone case of yours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com
Thanks to a fourth-grade teacher who encouraged the young Didi Conn to retell a story in her own way, the world got the chance to fall in love with a curly, pink-haired bob, "Beauty School Drop Out" and a pretty cool smoking technique. Conn, 59, was born Edith Bernstein and is known for her squeaky-voiced role as "Frenchy" in the movie "Grease. " She grew up in Brooklyn and by the time she was 2 wanted to be a dancer. But after reading "Pippy Longstocking" for a fourth-grade book report, Conn's ambition went from twirling center stage to shining on the silver screen.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a time when other newspapers are cutting back, the Philadelphia Daily News will launch an ambitious new weekend edition, it was announced Tuesday. The new edition, which will supplant the Saturday edition of the paper, will target a younger audience but retain the tabloid's emphasis on sports, features, and gossip, according to Daily News Editor Michael Days. "It will be sort of like the Daily News on steroids," Days said. "We want to keep it light, keep it fun, and keep it interesting.
LIVING
October 17, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Sales this weekend and next will be devoted to two major collections. Being offered by Freeman's beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday is the classical-music collection of former Philadelphian David Wolman, who over the last 10 years amassed more than 450 scores, manuscripts, books and illustrations, ranging from a first edition of four sonatas written by Mozart when he was 7 and hand-corrected by his father, to a hitherto undiscovered work by Sir Arthur...
NEWS
February 23, 2008
I READ Ed Galing's letter "What a Meshuggener!" (Feb. 9) and must say I'm quite surprised that he really feels that way. Ed has been writing letters for years. He, like me, should know that the Daily News doesn't publish every letter. I've had many letters published in the People Paper, but only a fraction of what I sent. Ed has had the same amount published, if not more. So, like me, Ed should know that the Daily News doesn't publish all of our letters to the editor. I guess that's only fair.
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