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New England Clam Chowder

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FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 6-8 servings 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 4 stalks of celery, medium dice 6 carrots, medium dice 4 medium potatoes, medium dice 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper 4 6 ounce cans minced clams in their juice 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice 1/4 cup flour 3 tablespoons butter 2 cups whole milk 1. Heat olive oil in...
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " A few years working in New England gave me a taste of some of the best "chowda" I had ever eaten, both at little corner restaurants, seafood shacks on the Cape, and of course, at the famed Legal Sea Foods in Boston. Everyone had their own version, but the best were smooth and rich soups, stocked with clams, potatoes, a little onion, and a healthy splash of cream. Back in the Philadelphia area, I found it hard to find the same soup, as most restaurant renditions were dense and gloppy, thickened with flour and resonating with a strong flavor of bacon.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
BAD CHOWDER RECALLED Borden Inc. yesterday recalled canned clam chowder distributed in 14 states and Washington, D.C., because chowder in some of the cans was not processed completely. Borden said the batch of Snow's New England Clam Chowder may not be sterile and could cause illness. Borden said it was recalling 15-ounce cans of Snow's New England Clam Chowder that are stamped on top with a "FEB 94" or "MAR 94" date and a second identification code ending in "C. " The cans were distributed in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Washington, D.C. NEW STUDY AFOOT The Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center is seeking volunteers for a study to determine the effectiveness of a new anti-fungal cream for athlete's foot.
NEWS
May 20, 2016
The truck: Your basic, pristine, Jersey-plated metal trailer, stationed at the same corner since 1989. The deal: Go elsewhere for truffled, cold-pressed, organic what-have-you. This truck's culinary treasures are the couple making your homemade hoagie: Anna and Rafi Barassatian, who arrive every weekday at 5:30 a.m. from their home in Brigantine, N.J. Order: The tuna salad. It's Rafi's specialty, a secret recipe. Have it on a Kaiser, rye or atop iceberg lettuce, which comes with sliced tomato, hard-boiled egg, dressing and a piece of hoagie roll, if you want.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2010
"Wine down" with the drink specials indoors and on the patio at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge by Eric Ripert (10 Avenue of the Arts, 215-523-8221). The new happy hour (5-8 p.m. weekdays) features $6 glasses of red, white and sparkling sangria; and red and white wine. Pitchers of sangria start at $14. There's also a new light bites menu by Chef de Cuisine Jennifer Carroll, a recent finalist on Bravo's "Top Chef. " The Roundtable will hold its 12th annual Taste of the World dinner at the Church of the Holy Apostles and Mediator (51st and Spruce streets)
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
If you haven't been any farther west on Market Street lately than the Shops at Liberty Place, take a stroll one of these glorious summer days. Pop into the beautiful Mellon Bank Center lobby at 18th and Market, so lavishly garbed with green marble that you'll think you're underwater. Or admire the wee landscaped park on the southeast corner of 19th and Market, where colorful flowers bloom amid shiny skyscrapers and ongoing construction. If seeing the brown-baggers in that small park puts you in the mood for lunch, the Market Street Cafe at 2000 Market St. can oblige.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
If you're looking for exceptional value in seafood, check out The Chowder Pot in Pennsauken, N.J. This spacious restaurant, decorated to the nth degree in a nautical theme, distinguishes itself with an all-you-can-eat salad bar that will make the seafood lover swoon. The standouts: medium (60 to 70 a pound) shrimp, steamed and chilled and served with an excellent cocktail sauce and lemon slices. Also included on the salad bar are the restaurant's namesake soups, two wonderful clam chowders.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Crabbies, located in the Delaire Plaza on State Road in the east Torresdale section of Northeast Philadelphia, opened for business about eight months ago. Since then, I had heard basically good things about it. But even though I only live about a five-minute ride away, I'd never been over to try it out. Until, that is, an editor walked over to my desk the other week, plopped a menu in front of me and said, "It's all yours. " That's how I found out, on a recent weeknight, that my friends were not wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Keeping up with traffic on New Jersey's Route 130 while talking on a cell phone takes concentration. I thought I was handling the chore safely, but one of my passengers was becoming anxious. Before she became yet another distraction, I turned onto serene Cove Street, heading into Merchantville, leaving speeding drivers to vent their rage on others. "What kind of car are you driving?" the voice on the other end of the phone asked. I told him and proceeded forward. "When you get to Centre Street, bear right.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2016
The truck: Your basic, pristine, Jersey-plated metal trailer, stationed at the same corner since 1989. The deal: Go elsewhere for truffled, cold-pressed, organic what-have-you. This truck's culinary treasures are the couple making your homemade hoagie: Anna and Rafi Barassatian, who arrive every weekday at 5:30 a.m. from their home in Brigantine, N.J. Order: The tuna salad. It's Rafi's specialty, a secret recipe. Have it on a Kaiser, rye or atop iceberg lettuce, which comes with sliced tomato, hard-boiled egg, dressing and a piece of hoagie roll, if you want.
FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 6-8 servings 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium yellow onions, chopped 4 stalks of celery, medium dice 6 carrots, medium dice 4 medium potatoes, medium dice 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper 4 6 ounce cans minced clams in their juice 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice 1/4 cup flour 3 tablespoons butter 2 cups whole milk 1. Heat olive oil in...
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " A few years working in New England gave me a taste of some of the best "chowda" I had ever eaten, both at little corner restaurants, seafood shacks on the Cape, and of course, at the famed Legal Sea Foods in Boston. Everyone had their own version, but the best were smooth and rich soups, stocked with clams, potatoes, a little onion, and a healthy splash of cream. Back in the Philadelphia area, I found it hard to find the same soup, as most restaurant renditions were dense and gloppy, thickened with flour and resonating with a strong flavor of bacon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2010
"Wine down" with the drink specials indoors and on the patio at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge by Eric Ripert (10 Avenue of the Arts, 215-523-8221). The new happy hour (5-8 p.m. weekdays) features $6 glasses of red, white and sparkling sangria; and red and white wine. Pitchers of sangria start at $14. There's also a new light bites menu by Chef de Cuisine Jennifer Carroll, a recent finalist on Bravo's "Top Chef. " The Roundtable will hold its 12th annual Taste of the World dinner at the Church of the Holy Apostles and Mediator (51st and Spruce streets)
FOOD
October 1, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chowder has a diverse history in North America, provoking strong feelings and often contradictory claims. Even the origin of the word chowder is disputed. About the only certainty is that different kinds of fish stews exist in almost every sea-bound country, and, inevitably, some versions ended up crossing the Atlantic. A popular theory is that the word comes from chaudiere, French for the large cauldron in which Breton sailors threw their catch to make a communal stew. It's believed that this custom in the 17th and 18th centuries was carried first to Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, and then down to New England.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Keeping up with traffic on New Jersey's Route 130 while talking on a cell phone takes concentration. I thought I was handling the chore safely, but one of my passengers was becoming anxious. Before she became yet another distraction, I turned onto serene Cove Street, heading into Merchantville, leaving speeding drivers to vent their rage on others. "What kind of car are you driving?" the voice on the other end of the phone asked. I told him and proceeded forward. "When you get to Centre Street, bear right.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If you miss the crab-stuffed flounder and roasted clams casino that were mainstays at the old Seafood Shanties, there's good news. These and other classics from that popular restaurant chain are being duplicated at Joe Gentile's Seafood Grille, in Northeast Philadelphia. Gentile is allowed to do that, because he was the guy who created the Seafood Shanty concept. Now he's given his name, consultant skills and recipes to this new restaurant, whose goal is to turn out fresh fish and shellfish at very affordable prices.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
For it to get any fresher than this, Laurel Seafood would have to be out to sea. Laurel Seafood, an unassuming shopping-center fish store and restaurant in a Clementon shopping strip, has been dishing up fresh local and specialty seafood for a decade. The restaurant is already a haven for locals - it was bustling on a recent Sunday night - but deserves even wider recognition. If you wonder what's on the menu, entering through the retail store's entrance to get into the dining room will lend a clue.
FOOD
November 14, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Can you remember when you last saw a line of would-be diners waiting for lunch tables? I can't. Or rather I couldn't. But at a recent lunch at Marabella's Parkway restaurant (the chain has other branches in the city and suburbs), both the restaurant's bar and dining room were filled at noon, and, when we left an hour later, we had to thread our way through a crowd waiting at the door. I once thought that modest prices were the big deal at Marabella's, but they appear to be creeping out of that category.
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