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New Firm

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BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's roster of major-league law firms has an addition. The new firm is Myerson & Kuhn, which is touting itself as an all-star player in the nation's legal arena with an impressive list of clients and revenues that it expects to top $50 million in its first year. The firm, which already has about 150 lawyers, opened offices last week in Philadelphia, New York and Dallas. Bowie Kuhn, the commissioner of major league baseball from 1969 to 1984, who was counsel to the prestigious New York law firm of Willkie Farr & Gallagher, is a name partner of the new firm.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Labor litigation specialist Stephen J. Cabot has left the Philadelphia law firm of Pechner, Dorfman, Wolffe, Rounick, and Cabot to team up with former baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn and another high-profile New York lawyer to form a new firm, Myerson & Kuhn. The new firm will be based in New York, with offices in Philadelphia and Dallas. Harvey Myerson was formerly former managing partner of New York's Finley, Kumble, Wagner, Heine, Underberg, Manley, Myerson & Casey, which used to be the nation's fourth-largest law firm and was dissolved several weeks ago. Kuhn had been affiliated with Willkie Farr & Gallagher in New York.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Claire Furia, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Newtown Township Board of Supervisors on Tuesday dropped the firm that has been performing its traffic signal maintenance for 15 years and signed on with Lobec Inc. of Broomall for a one-year pact. The supervisors chose Lobec, whose bid was $3,900, over Signal Service Inc. of Exton, the township's long-term provider whose bid was $6,300. "I thought it was time to put it out to bid," said Township Manager Larry M. Comunale, who added that Lobec had been lauded by area townships.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1992 | By Frederick Cusick and Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A two-year-old law firm started by John M. Elliott, one of the city's most visible lawyers, has broken up. Robert J. Bray Jr., co-chairman of Elliott & Bray, filed suit in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court last month asking that the firm he set up with Elliott in 1990 be "wound up and dissolved" and that a receiver be appointed for its assets. Bray's suit does not specify any causes for the breakup. In an interview yesterday, Bray said the breakup was a private business matter that he hoped to "resolve amicably.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three of the nation's five minority-owned brokerage houses, including one in Philadelphia, are teaming up to launch a new financial-services company. The new corporation - to be formally announced at a news conference here next week - will be a joint venture of Daniels & Bell of New York; Pryor, Govan, Counts & Co., of Philadelphia, and Metro Equities Corp., of Chicago. Travers J. Bell Jr., chairman of Daniels & Bell, said yesterday that the new corporation was aimed at serving "not just the minority market, but the 'under-serviced' market" of small investment firms, those with capitalization of between $5 million and $25 million.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Philadelphia has won one and lost one. Labor litigation specialist Stephen J. Cabot has left the Philadelphia law firm of Pechner, Dorfman, Wolffe, Rounick & Cabot to team up with former baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn and another high-profile New York lawyer to form a new firm, Myerson & Kuhn. And, at the same time, Pechner Dorfman is being dissolved. The remaining partners in the 70-year-old firm, including chairman Leonard Schaeffer and Charles Bowser, could not be reached for comment yesterday.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden School District's new insurance broker yesterday met a May 1 deadline for keeping the district insured, and did so for $130,000 less than the coverage provided by a Cherry Hill-based insurance firm owned by former Camden County Party boss George E. Norcross 3d. Concerns that the new broker may not have been able to meet the deadline were raised at a school board meeting last week at which Norcross' Keystone National was kicked off...
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
IS BRIAN TIERNEY, the former CEO of a company that owned the Daily News , taking his own name in vain? If he wasn't already, he might be now, given a civil suit that was filed this week in Common Pleas Court in which Tierney is listed as both a defendant and a plaintiff. The case of Tierney v. Tierney pits the public-relations guru and his new firm, Brian Communications Group, against his old company, Tierney Communications, which claims that Tierney is violating an agreement not to use his own name in another business.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Green is joining the law firm of Dilworth Paxson L.L.P. Green, head of the Philadelphia School Reform Commission and a former city councilman, makes the jump from Duane Morris L.L.P. on Tuesday. He will become special counsel in Dilworth Paxson's corporate and business department. Green is the latest heavy hitter to join the storied Philadelphia firm. Former U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews also joined Dilworth Paxson this year. The move was confirmed by Ajay Raju, the firm's new chief executive and cochairman, who has made attracting civic-powerhouse lawyers a priority.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Green is joining the law firm of Dilworth Paxson L.L.P. Green, head of the Philadelphia School Reform Commission and a former city councilman, makes the jump from Duane Morris L.L.P. on Tuesday. He will become special counsel in Dilworth Paxson's corporate and business department. Green is the latest heavy hitter to join the storied Philadelphia firm. Former U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews also joined Dilworth Paxson this year. The move was confirmed by Ajay Raju, the firm's new chief executive and cochairman, who has made attracting civic-powerhouse lawyers a priority.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When times were good, Andrew Bogdanoff raked in more than $1 million a year from his commercial financing firm and spent thousands each month on luxury cars, elaborate trips abroad, and expensive jewelry. Last month, he grossed just $13 - an income scraped from his new job as a kitchen assistant in federal prison. On Thursday, Bogdanoff, 67, was sentenced to 18 years and four months behind bars for the crimes that brought about his abrupt financial fall - a punishment his victims hope will spur tighter regulations to stop financial crimes perpetrated against small business owners.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its bid for Philadelphia's second casino license, Penn National Gaming Inc. has proposed an ownership structure that would steer two-thirds of the profits to schools and the city's woefully underfunded pension fund. In Maryland's Prince George's County, Penn National has gone further, promising 100 percent of profits to an educators' retirement plan and a neighborhood health network. Playing a key part in both of those proposals is a new company that Penn National spun off to shareholders on a tax-free basis effective Nov. 1. Penn National is not in the Philly 50 but is based nearby, in Wyomissing, Pa. The spin-off is Gaming & Leisure Properties Inc., a real estate investment trust that has assumed ownership of the real estate associated with most of Penn National's casinos.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County Commissioner Bruce L. Castor Jr. has served as district attorney and considered running for governor. Next month, he will become a partner at the Bryn Mawr law firm Rogers & Associates. Castor said he had had no plans to leave the firm of Elliot Greenleaf, which he has been with since 2008. But lawyer Lance Rogers approached him with an offer to join a smaller firm and help increase its client base, he said. "I was very happy where I was, but this is an opportunity to do something new and exciting," Castor said Thursday.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
A NONPROFIT GROUP in Washington thinks that we should know the players in the City Council fight to provide paid sick leave for more people employed here. We couldn't agree more. That's why we were curious about the reluctance of the nonprofit ROC Exposed to tell us more about itself. The group takes its name from its stated mission, exposing Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a pro-labor organization that pushes for paid sick days for restaurant workers. ROC Exposed, in an email to reporters just before a Council hearing Tuesday on paid sick leave, said that the issue was being pushed by a "labor union front group.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's first pick to head the once-fearsome Department of Justice Antitrust Division scared would-be monopolists, at least for a moment. "When markets are competitive, the consumer wins," Christine Varney told the U.S. Chamber of Commerce back in 2009. She blamed the ideology of Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush that, she claimed, let industries regulate themselves. "Higher prices, reduced product variety, and slower innovations" were the result, Varney said.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
To devise a plan to distribute billions in federal money for Sandy relief, the Christie administration hired a company fired for poor management under a similar contract in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike in 2008. "It was a complete nightmare," said Steve Greenberg, a former councilman in Galveston, Texas, who said CDM Smith failed to pay subcontractors and to deliver on its promises of home construction after the storm. CDM Smith narrowly survived a dismissal vote from the Galveston City Council in 2011.
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