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NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
The Marple Township Zoning Hearing Board has voted unanimously to grant a Broomall couple's request for a variance to build a house on a vacant lot on Davis Avenue. The couple, Donald and Maryann Tallman of 29 Davis Ave., had requested the variance to enable them to have only 5 feet of side-yard setback instead of the 8 feet required under R-3 residential zoning, which requires a minimum lot size of 6,250 square feet. The Tallmans later amended the encroachment to 2 feet, saying that they would use up 1 foot of setback on the other side of the house instead.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The City of Philadelphia has made a formal offer to compensate Helen Anthony, the woman whose home was torn down during one of the city's raid-and- demolish missions to clean up a drug-infested block of North Philadelphia. City officials - who said they had razed the house because it was about to collapse, but conceded they had acted on the assumption that the house was abandoned and used only by heroin addicts - want to buy Anthony a new house and pay for her losses. In a letter to Anthony, 60, James B. Jordan of the City Solicitor's Office said the city was willing to: Pay Anthony the value of her lost home at 2946 Germantown Ave., which the city estimated at $4,200.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | By Howard Gensler, Special to The Inquirer
Zoning officials and neighbors have expressed concern over a proposal to build a house on a vacant lot at 2624 Bala Lane. At a meeting of the Haverford Township Zoning Hearing Board Thursday, neighbors said they were concerned about the possible appearance of the 1 1/2- story house George Lavin was seeking to build for his parents, who are in their 80s. They also voiced fears that the house could negatively affect neighborhood property values....
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One more Main Line residence has entered the elite circle of houses for sale for more than a $1 million, and 285 real estate agents trooped through it Tuesday to see what it had to offer. The home, called Caitwood, is an 11,000-square-foot French Norman-style home, on Mount Pleasant Road in Gladwyne, and has an asking price of $1.63 million. Selling such a house in today's marketplace is not an easy task, say area agents, whose upscale clients can face as many uncertainties as other home buyers, or more.
REAL_ESTATE
July 11, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Daniel Glaubinger and Sauce Leon were moving to Philadelphia from Newark, N.J., and they wanted a home that was environmentally sustainable and did not take up a lot of room. For the couple - Glaubinger teaches high school history and Leon, his husband, teaches special education at an elementary school - house-hunting resulted in that vision's evolving a bit. "First, we looked at old houses, and we loved the way they looked, but they had all kinds of leakages and high costs," says Glaubinger.
REAL_ESTATE
August 19, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
So you've bought a new house. Congratulations. The house is probably filled with the latest of everything you can afford, and more so. If you are a high-end buyer, the house does have it all. For now. In a consumer-driven economy where change comes daily and innovations fill pages of shelter magazines, your new house will get old pretty quickly. And this has nothing to do with the quality of the builder or the materials he used to construct your house. It's just the way we are. "People who buy new houses are striving for perfection," said Jean Dimeo, editor of Building Products magazine in Washington.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | BY DAVE BARRY
Recently I stood in the kitchen of our new home, amid hundreds of cardboard boxes, all helpfully labeled BETH, and watched my wife, Beth, open a box. She cut through several layers of tape, opened the box flaps and pulled out an object that had been laboriously wadded up inside roughly 2,000 square feet of white paper. She unwrapped it, layer by layer, until finally she got to the object that had been so carefully protected: a coffee mug. With coffee still in it. If you're wondering why we packed a mug with coffee in it, the answer is, we are not that stupid.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
Visitors invited 208 years ago to the home of William Waln, a merchant in the China trade, and his wife were in for a shock. The new house, which stood at the southeast corner of Seventh and Chestnut Streets, was quiet on the outside, a cubic form standing gracefully in the garden. But the interior was far from quiet. The three main ground-floor rooms where the Walns entertained were at once antiquarian and completely cutting edge. They had none of the fine woodwork and intricate cabinetmaking for which Philadelphia had long been famous.
REAL_ESTATE
May 10, 2009 | By Destin┬Łe-Charisse Royal FOR THE INQUIRER
By the time Linda and Mike Rooney first toured the 170-year-old Upper Dublin house in 2005, they had already seen about 50 properties. They were so grateful to find the place they would eventually buy, they were prepared to gift-wrap a halo and give it away on closing day. "We looked for three years. It was a long time. . . . I felt bad for our Realtor," Linda Rooney, 47, said. "She's a saint," added Mike Rooney, also 47. "We kept saying, 'Are you sure you want to show us more houses?
NEWS
December 31, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph D. Kestenbaum, who tore down the 80-year-old castle-like La Ronda mansion, is building a $5 million stone-veneer, three-story house with an indoor hockey rink to replace it. Gone for good are the towering turrets, stained glass, and "great hall" room constructed in Bryn Mawr by leather-tanning magnate Percival Foerderer 80 years ago. In their place, according to plans filed with Lower Merion Township, will be the basement rink, a solarium,...
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NEWS
September 5, 2016
Visitors invited 208 years ago to the home of William Waln, a merchant in the China trade, and his wife were in for a shock. The new house, which stood at the southeast corner of Seventh and Chestnut Streets, was quiet on the outside, a cubic form standing gracefully in the garden. But the interior was far from quiet. The three main ground-floor rooms where the Walns entertained were at once antiquarian and completely cutting edge. They had none of the fine woodwork and intricate cabinetmaking for which Philadelphia had long been famous.
REAL_ESTATE
July 11, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Daniel Glaubinger and Sauce Leon were moving to Philadelphia from Newark, N.J., and they wanted a home that was environmentally sustainable and did not take up a lot of room. For the couple - Glaubinger teaches high school history and Leon, his husband, teaches special education at an elementary school - house-hunting resulted in that vision's evolving a bit. "First, we looked at old houses, and we loved the way they looked, but they had all kinds of leakages and high costs," says Glaubinger.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Central Philadelphia's coming supply of new housing could overshoot demand if policy makers and businesses cannot attract more residents to the city and keep a larger portion of existing ones from leaving, according to data in a report released Tuesday. There are 5,833 apartments, condo units and houses under construction and scheduled for delivery in and around Center City over the next three years, 1,936 more than would be absorbed under recent growth rates, the Center City District said in its report on housing.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Leona Wright, then a feisty 94-year-old Bible school teacher, was beaming. It was November 2013 and Wright and her longtime neighbors had just learned that they would not have to move out of the Mount Holly Gardens, after all. "Yes, yes, I'm getting a new house" in the Gardens, she said that chilly night when the residents packed a Mount Holly Township meeting to hear about a potential settlement. It was just days before the case was to go before the U.S. Supreme Court and the settlement would allow the Burlington County town to demolish the complex of aging rowhouses but give Wright and 19 other families new condominiums in the planned development of several hundred units in the Gardens neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2016
Q: My husband and I are considering buying a house in a great location, but it seems very open to the street. The windows let in lots of light, except there is no privacy - anybody going by can see right in, especially the kitchen. And my husband and I love to cook together and sometimes we get "playful. " I'd hate to live with all the curtains closed. We want this house, but I love our "moments" together, and I don't want to lose them. - M&M 4ever! A: It's wonderful to find playful moments whenever you can, not just around your anniversary or Valentine's Day. Celebrating cooking and food together is very romantic, and I would also hate for you to lose that because you feel on display in a new house.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kylie's shocking admission Never in a million years would I have guessed that Kylie Jenner was not born with those flap-like subterranean creatures glued to her mouth - you know, where the lips should be. In a disturbing revelation that has rocked our world, Kim Kardashian 's sis admits her lips have been bionically altered by Victor Frankenstein, M.D . The truth comes by way of reality TV: Kylie, 17, admits in two new clips from...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
DEESHA DYER has come a long way from her days of handing out free condoms at Fluid and other local nightclubs. These days, instead of trying to persuade partygoers to get themselves tested for HIV, she's in charge of all of the social functions at the White House. Yeah, you read that right. The White House as in 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. As the new White House social secretary, her job is to work closely with first lady Michelle Obama to compile guest lists for opulent dinners honoring visiting dignitaries such as Chinese President Xi Jinping, who's coming in September.
SPORTS
March 8, 2015
WITH THE NEWS earlier this week that the Eagles had released Cary Williams, a good many of the team's fans took to social media to give him a single-digit salute and hurl the kind of insults at the 30-year-old cornerback that they never, ever would have had the guts to hurl if he was standing in front of them. But that's par for the course these days when so many manage to find courage only when they're hiding behind an anonymous user name or a blog that doesn't require them ever to visit a locker room and look a man in the eye. I'm not suggesting Williams deserved a parade down Broad Street for his 2 years of service with the Eagles.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - At Gov. Wolf's inaugural last month, new House Majority Leader Dave Reed was among those seated in the A-list section outside the Capitol. After the ceremony, a state official turned to Reed, looking for a program. Reed told him he did not know where there was an extra one. The official, whom Reed declined to name, responded by saying, "If you want your boss, the governor, to be successful, you'd better know where the programs are. " Without missing a beat, Reed replied, "My apologies, sir. " It happens that way for Reed - a lot. At 36, he more closely resembles the star athlete who just got named president of his college fraternity than a six-term lawmaker just elected leader of the Republican House majority in the nation's sixth most populous state.
NEWS
January 14, 2015
THE NEW state House majority leader, one of the most powerful posts in Harrisburg, isn't exactly a carbon copy of leaders in Pennsylvania. In fact, Dave Reed, of rural Indiana County, "Christmas Tree Capital of the World," seems an odd fit for leadership in a legislature known for sameness. He was sworn in last week. He's far from the same ol', same ol'. He's in the party of old men but, at 36, is the youngest GOP legislative leader in the state's modern history. He started life in a trailer park, but holds an Ivy League master's degree from Penn's Fels Institute of Government.
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