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BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This Labor Day weekend, let's consider that excellent and endangered worker benefit, the guaranteed retirement pension. Let's look at the New Jersey state pension system , which more than 750,000 schoolteachers, troopers, and other public servants are counting on to keep them comfortable through their golden decades. The problem with this happy arrangement is that the politicians who promised - and who also collect - state pensions haven't set aside money to pay them all. New Jersey's pension funds have about $80 billion to pay at least $120 billion in future checks.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saltwater marshes along the Jersey Shore and Delaware Bay, like marshes everywhere, are in trouble. For many reasons, including sea-level rise, they're becoming less marshy and more watery. They're drowning. New Jersey, partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers and conservationists, has begun an $8.2 million pilot project that could not only restore the marshes, but also save money and solve other problems along the way. The new miracle method: Spray mud. In the Intracoastal Waterway behind Stone Harbor and Avalon, a dredge is sucking up sand and muck that has clogged the channel since Hurricane Sandy blew through.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the calls for help came that September day in 1934, volunteer first aid squads were still new - and about to face a very real test. A fire had spread through the luxury liner Morro Castle as it rocked and rolled through a nor'easter off the New Jersey coast. Scores of passengers were burned and injured; 137 died. First aiders from 34 squads sprang into action, triaging victims and transporting many to area hospitals. Three years later, they were again called on for a major disaster when the luxury airship Hindenburg was engulfed in flames while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Ocean County.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
MAYS LANDING, N.J. - The words common sense were mentioned quite a bit during Shaneen Allen's hearing yesterday in Atlantic County Superior Court. Allen, 27, cried for a moment in the hallway with her son Naiare and his father after a judge denied her motion to dismiss weapons charges filed against her in October and refused to overturn a prosecutor's decision to deny her entry into a first-time-offender diversion program. So Allen walked back into court, turned down a plea deal that would have given her a 3 1/2-year sentence and decided to go to trial in October, hoping a jury would use some common sense and not send a working mother of two to prison for not knowing New Jersey's gun laws.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Katie Zezima, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - The location of the trees that Joyce Kilmer wrote were more lovely than any poem has long been in dispute, with a handful of towns from Massachusetts to Indiana claiming to have inspired the verse. But a New Jersey historian said he now has irrefutable proof that Kilmer was stirred by the woods of the Ramapo Valley when he wrote the well-known words, "I think that I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree. " Alex Michelini, founder of the Joyce Kilmer Society in Mahwah, said Friday that a letter written in 1929 by Kilmer's widow, Aline, to a graduate student shows that "Trees" was written on Feb. 2, 1913, at the couple's former home in Mahwah.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Question 1 Do you approve an amendment to the New Jersey Constitution, as agreed to by the Legislature, to allow contributions set by law to be taken from the salaries of Supreme Court Justices and Superior Court Judges for their employee benefits? (93% of the vote) Yes . . . 1,274,618 No . . . 774,121 Question 2 Do you approve the "Building Our Future Bond Act"? This bond act authorizes the State to issue bonds in the aggregate principal amount of $750 million to provide matching grants to New Jersey's colleges and universities.
NEWS
January 19, 2006
In his inaugural, Gov. Corzine said he would "never settle for less than excellence. " What does that mean to you in terms of how the state operates? What should he do to ensure that fellow state leaders uphold that same standard? Share your ideas in essays of 250 words or fewer. E-mail us by Wednesday at sjvoices@phillynews.com, fax 856-779-3221, or write to The Inquirer, attn: Community Voices, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002. Please put "Corzine" in the subject line.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - More than five years after New Jersey passed a law to start tracking prescription drug use, the state will launch a database to monitor use of dangerous drugs with the intent of helping doctors spot abusers more quickly and authorities stop drug dealers. The database, which has been collecting information since Sept. 1, contains more than four million prescriptions. Starting this month, doctors and pharmacies, including mail-order operations, can access detailed patient information on prescriptions for painkillers, steroids, sedatives, and stimulants.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012 | By Greg Beacham, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - New Jersey coach Peter DeBoer shook up his lineup with the Devils down to their last gasp in the Stanley Cup Finals. Forward Petr Sykora and defenseman Henrik Tallinder cracked the lineup for Game 4 on Wednesday night. And the Devils pulled out a 3-1 victory to stay alive. The Kings lead the series, three games to one. Tallinder has been out since January because of a blood clot, but apparently was ready to play in this series. "Peter Harrold played great, gave us some good minutes," DeBoer said.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
The results of New Jersey municipal and school board elections are available by phone and online. Camden County Board of Elections 856-401-VOTE (8683) or 1-800-418-9427 www.philly.com/camden Burlington County Board of Elections 609-265-5062 www.philly.com/burlington Gloucester County Board of Elections 856-384-4500 www.philly.com/gloucester
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Incredibly, New Jersey does not publish the multimillion-dollar fees it pays to the private investment contractors it hires to manage billions in state pension funds - unlike Pennsylvania and other states, which list those charges in annual reports and post the data online. When I asked for the list of what New Jersey has paid each investment manager since it started hiring them a few years back, the state Treasury Department spokesman at first said it wasn't public information.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This Labor Day weekend, let's consider that excellent and endangered worker benefit, the guaranteed retirement pension. Let's look at the New Jersey state pension system , which more than 750,000 schoolteachers, troopers, and other public servants are counting on to keep them comfortable through their golden decades. The problem with this happy arrangement is that the politicians who promised - and who also collect - state pensions haven't set aside money to pay them all. New Jersey's pension funds have about $80 billion to pay at least $120 billion in future checks.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Some of New Jersey's top Democrats said Friday that organized labor is under assault across the country, even as the movement has gained considerable clout in Trenton. "We're under attack, and this country has gone backward as we've seen labor go backward," State Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said in a speech at an annual AFL-CIO gathering in Collingswood in advance of Labor Day. To help reverse the trend, he said, New Jersey needs to send State Sen. Donald Norcross to Congress and reelect U.S. Sen. Cory A. Booker.
SPORTS
August 29, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
The Flyers re-signed restricted free-agent defenseman Brandon Manning, who played last year for the Phantoms, the team announced Wednesday. Manning, 24, who signed a one-year deal, had eight goals and 23 assists in 73 games at Adirondak. He also recorded two assists in six games with the Flyers. In TV and radio news, Steve Coates will return to the radio side to handle color commentary alongside play-by-play voice Tim Saunders. Former Flyers defenseman Chris Therien will move from radio to Coates' old role as inside-the-glass, ice-level reporter for game telecasts.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's largest utility says the $8.1 billion it is spending over 10 years on transmission projects is powering more than the electrical grid - it's putting a lot of juice into the state's economy. Public Service Electric & Gas Co. released Wednesday a Rutgers University economic report it commissioned that estimates the utility's power-transmission projects are creating an average of 6,000 jobs a year over a decade. The 12-page report by the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers was released at a rally at an electrical workers' union hall in North Brunswick that seemed aimed at building political and public support for more energy infrastructure projects.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man accused in a gunrunning operation that allegedly transported illegal guns from South Carolina to South Jersey will remain in custody awaiting trial. Joseph Rutling, 23, made his first appearance Tuesday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider. At the brief hearing, Rutling waived a preliminary hearing on charges of dealing in firearms and possession of a firearm by a felon. Rutling faces up to 15 years in prison and a $500,000 fine if convicted on both counts. He was returned to the Camden County Jail, where he is serving a 364-day sentence on an unrelated weapons conviction.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saltwater marshes along the Jersey Shore and Delaware Bay, like marshes everywhere, are in trouble. For many reasons, including sea-level rise, they're becoming less marshy and more watery. They're drowning. New Jersey, partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers and conservationists, has begun an $8.2 million pilot project that could not only restore the marshes, but also save money and solve other problems along the way. The new miracle method: Spray mud. In the Intracoastal Waterway behind Stone Harbor and Avalon, a dredge is sucking up sand and muck that has clogged the channel since Hurricane Sandy blew through.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the calls for help came that September day in 1934, volunteer first aid squads were still new - and about to face a very real test. A fire had spread through the luxury liner Morro Castle as it rocked and rolled through a nor'easter off the New Jersey coast. Scores of passengers were burned and injured; 137 died. First aiders from 34 squads sprang into action, triaging victims and transporting many to area hospitals. Three years later, they were again called on for a major disaster when the luxury airship Hindenburg was engulfed in flames while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Ocean County.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an Atlantic City conference room filled with people who had just paid $1,000 to learn how to grow marijuana, the speaker asked if anyone in law enforcement was among the crowd. No one's hand shot up. "That does not mean they're not here," Adam Scavone, a New York City lawyer, cautioned the nearly 80 people who attended Oaksterdam University's course at Bally's Wild Wild West Casino on Saturday. There, just off the boardwalk, the West met the East as the California-based school held its first marijuana-growing seminar on this side of the country.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO commuters will face another reduction in service sooner than expected so that construction workers have more time to replace tracks and ties on the Ben Franklin Bridge. The new schedule, with fewer inconveniences for riders than the one that lasted from Memorial Day until Aug. 1, will start Friday. It is slated to last until Oct. 21. Previously, PATCO had said the new round of construction would require a 50-day reduced schedule, starting on Labor Day weekend. The new reductions in service will be caused by the closure of the track on the north side of the bridge for replacement of tracks, ties, signals, and other equipment.
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