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New Jersey American Water

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NEWS
October 2, 1996 | By Shawna McCoy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before a crowd of about 150 residents, the township commissioners adopted an ordinance last night that will double some ratepayers' water bills as Haddon Township gears up to buy water from the New Jersey American Water Co. The new rates will be based on consumption, and bills will be sent four times a year, beginning in January. However, residents will also receive a separate, additional water bill in December to cover the emergency purchase of water from New Jersey American last month.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | By Tamara Chuang, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Angry about a proposed 35 percent increase in the price of his tap water, resident Fred Schlobohm rallied the troops. Last night, the troops - representatives from Burlington County municipalities - joined him at a Township Committee meeting to express their concerns about the substantial raise proposed by the New Jersey-American Water Co. for its customers. Schlobohm said at the meeting that communities needed to band together, hire an attorney, and show up en masse at the Aug. 15 hearing of the Board of Public Utilities on the proposed increase.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the New Jersey-American Water Co. has its way, most residents of 35 municipalities in Burlington and Camden Counties will soon be paying 15.7 percent more for their water. The company filed a request with the state Board of Public Utilities on Monday to increase rates for 89,000 households (an estimated 243,000 residents) in the two counties. If the BPU grants the full rate increase, the average monthly residential bill for New Jersey-American customers will increase by $5.16 a month from $32.84 to $38 - an annual increase of $62 on the current average $394 yearly bill.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
New Jersey American Water on Friday refinanced four outstanding bond issues totaling $150 million with three new series of bonds issued by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority. The company, a subsidiary of American Water Works Co. Inc., of Voorhees, will save $1.2 million in annual interest expenses, said John Bigelow, president of New Jersey American Water.    - Andy Maykuth
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
At the four-way stop intersection at Smithville and Powell Roads in Eastampton Township, an area that used to be a big plot of grass has turned into a scenic stop. "We're a small town, but we do have distinctive character," Eastampton Mayor Rob Apgar said. "I see people actually pulling over to take pictures. . . . People never did that before. " It is not a park or monument that passersby are admiring; it's a stormwater basin. One of several in the township, the basin collects and infiltrates stormwater, but it has been naturalized, so it's covered in wildflowers instead of a green lawn.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
It's frustrating enough for water company workers to try to find an underground pipe with only a century-old handwritten piece of paper for reference. And sometimes, that slip of paper uses nonexistent landmarks - which house is it in front of? None of these houses is yellow anymore, and the writing is faded, or sloppy, or the drawing is crudely sketched. "And then you dig there - no, it's not there. And then you dig here - it's not here," said Chris Kahn, senior geographic information systems project manager for New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
MIDDLETOWN, N.J. - Nearly two dozen Monmouth County municipalities remained under a boil-water advisory Saturday as crews worked to repair a water-main break at a water-treatment plant in Middletown Township. County officials also were continuing a ban on outdoor water usage imposed after the break Friday afternoon at New Jersey American Water Co.'s treatment plant at Swimming River Reservoir. New Jersey American Water serves about 55,000 people in Monmouth County. The company set up temporary distribution sites Saturday morning where customers could fill containers with water.
NEWS
September 22, 1999 | DAVID M WARREN / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Rubber duckies all in a row adorn the desk of secretary Marie Wagner at the New Jersey-American Water Co. treatment plant in Delran. The duckies, each nicknamed Puddles, are the company mascots. New Jersey-American - which takes water from the Delaware, cleans it, and has it on its way to customers within two hours - annually issues a redesigned, and obviously collectible, Puddles.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
A dry June and a scorching start to July have prompted New Jersey American Water Co. to impose water-use restrictions on residents of two counties near the Jersey Shore. The company notified residents of Monmouth County over the weekend to discontinue outdoor water use such as lawn watering and car washing. It's also asking residents of some Ocean County communities to voluntarily limit outdoor water use. There has been a significant spike in water use since the weather turned hot again late last week, according to a company spokesman.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Township Council last night voted in favor of three bond ordinances totaling more than $1 million to spruce up the town hall, continue the Strawbridge Lake restoration project, and increase the township's water plant capacity. An ordinance authorizing $650,000 for expansion of the North Church Street water treatment plant was the largest of the bonds approved by the council. The project, which involves redrilling the well and various upgrades to plant equipment, will allow the township to increase its pumping capacity from 950 to 1,500 gallons per minute, said Township Manager Jack Terry.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
At the four-way stop intersection at Smithville and Powell Roads in Eastampton Township, an area that used to be a big plot of grass has turned into a scenic stop. "We're a small town, but we do have distinctive character," Eastampton Mayor Rob Apgar said. "I see people actually pulling over to take pictures. . . . People never did that before. " It is not a park or monument that passersby are admiring; it's a stormwater basin. One of several in the township, the basin collects and infiltrates stormwater, but it has been naturalized, so it's covered in wildflowers instead of a green lawn.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
It's frustrating enough for water company workers to try to find an underground pipe with only a century-old handwritten piece of paper for reference. And sometimes, that slip of paper uses nonexistent landmarks - which house is it in front of? None of these houses is yellow anymore, and the writing is faded, or sloppy, or the drawing is crudely sketched. "And then you dig there - no, it's not there. And then you dig here - it's not here," said Chris Kahn, senior geographic information systems project manager for New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Future control of its drinking water continued to vex this beleaguered seaside city Wednesday, as it faced a looming state takeover and unrelenting outside interest in its water utility. The City Council was set to vote on bringing the water authority under direct city control in an effort to both monetize it and stave off private interests. But after a closed-door meeting, the council voted to delay any vote for 90 days. Meanwhile, the current head of the Municipal Utility Authority, G. Bruce Ward, made a plea to keep the department an independent authority - but also said he planned to seek a "private partner" who would kick in $100 million to the authority.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of two Moorestown wells - shut down in October because of a chemical contaminant found in the town's water - has been ordered reopened after tests showed the chemical is no longer present. The action Tuesday evening by the Moorestown Township Council came at the recommendation of Township Manager D. Scott Carew, who also called for a pilot study to develop a water treatment plan for the other well at the North Church Street treatment plant. The chemical found in the water last October was 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fourth graders from Cinnaminson's Rush Intermediate School did not let Friday's wet and cloudy weather put a damper on the 13th annual Make a Splash! Water Festival at the Palmyra Cove Nature Park. In fact, some students said it was perfect bubble-blowing weather. The event was started by Elaine Mendelow, a teacher of the gifted program for Cinnaminson students, to stress the importance of conserving water and keeping the waterways pollution free. It is also an opportunity for the children to learn about some of the science behind water, such as cohesion and adhesion.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The first time I saw Camden's Harrison Avenue landfill, it had been closed for years. It was also on fire. I'd been dispatched by an editor to check on a report that the grass atop the toxic tundra of buried trash was ablaze again. And so it was, on a hot afternoon in the late 1970s. Last week, I returned to Harrison Avenue to tour the $68 million Salvation Army Kroc Center, which is on schedule for an Oct. 4 ribbon-cutting ceremony. The project's cost includes $21 million for 34 acres of site remediation work by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The beach on Thursday was covered in visitors who would likely go home, flush the toilet, take a shower, dry off with a laundered towel, and maybe have a nice glass of . . . something. Probably none of them considered exactly where the water that would allow them to do all of those things - including making an iced tea - came from. Except, perhaps, for those beachgoers at the Seventh Street beach who stopped to look at a quirky sand sculpture by the artist John Gruber, commissioned by New Jersey American Water.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Scott Gurian, NJ SPOTLIGHT
As Atlantic County Utility Authority president Richard Dovey sees it, the reason New Jersey's water and sewer systems need more than $40 billion in repairs can be partially explained by two events that took place in Atlantic County recently. Earlier this month, authorities closed Atlantic City's Ohio Avenue Bridge - a vital link to the neighborhood of Venice Park - after engineers found the structure was in need of emergency repairs. The move attracted a fair amount of media coverage and attention from local residents, who could see the police tape blocking their usual route and knew they had to take a detour.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
MIDDLETOWN, N.J. - Nearly two dozen Monmouth County municipalities remained under a boil-water advisory Saturday as crews worked to repair a water-main break at a water-treatment plant in Middletown Township. County officials also were continuing a ban on outdoor water usage imposed after the break Friday afternoon at New Jersey American Water Co.'s treatment plant at Swimming River Reservoir. New Jersey American Water serves about 55,000 people in Monmouth County. The company set up temporary distribution sites Saturday morning where customers could fill containers with water.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey American Water is seeking an average 15 percent rate increase for 2012, prompting one local official to call the request "obscene. " The Voorhees-based company, which has 640,000 customers in 188 municipalities in South Jersey and across the state, says it needs the increase to help pay for the more than $300 million it has invested in infrastructure this year. Burlington County Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio is calling on officials of other counties and mayors to join forces to fight the proposal.
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