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NEWS
April 3, 2004 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey drunken-driving law inspired by the death of Navy Ensign John Elliott has been copied in a federal transportation bill that the U.S. House passed yesterday. An amendment would encourage other states to pass their own "John's Law" by offering them federal grants. Such a law gives police the authority to impound a drunk driver's vehicle. Elliott, 22, was killed July 22, 2000, in Salem County by a drunk driver who had been arrested earlier in the evening. Still intoxicated, the driver, Michael Pangle of Woodstown, N.J., was released to a friend who took him back to his vehicle.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a review by the state attorney general, the Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office announced Wednesday that it would allow a Philadelphia woman charged last year with illegally bringing into New Jersey a gun that was legally registered in Pennsylvania to enter a pretrial-intervention program and avoid jail time. The prosecutor's previous stance in the case involving Shaneen Allen, 27, was to make the case a "deterrent," either forcing a plea or bringing it to trial. The mother of two could have faced up to five years in prison.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the rollout of FiOS nearing an end, the working-class residents of Laurel Springs, Somerdale, and Lindenwold wonder whether they will ever get to enjoy the latest Internet and TV products of Verizon Communications Inc. So far, Verizon has wired Cherry Hill and Haddonfield - more affluent communities - and county seat Camden for fiber-based Internet and TV. The telecom giant, in fact, has run FiOS through most of Camden County. For a complete map of the coverage area click here.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - ExxonMobil Corp.'s chief lawyer on Wednesday defended the firm's tentative $225 million settlement with New Jersey in a pollution case, saying the $8.9 billion the state sought at trial last year was "devoid of any scientific or economic legitimacy. " New Jersey Democrats and environmentalists have attacked the Christie administration's proposed settlement as a sellout to polluters. Two state senators have vowed to try to block it in court. But ExxonMobil general counsel Jack Balagia said Wednesday that the state's initial $8.9 billion claim was based on a faulty report.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Next week, Burlington Township Police Department officers will add a tool to their arsenals: body-worn cameras. On Monday, five members of the local force will come to work with baseball-size cameras affixed to their blue uniform shirts. The more than three dozen remaining officers in the department will begin using the cameras by September, after completing individual training. A combination of capital funds and grants amounting to $68,500, including $22,000 from the state Attorney General's Body Worn Camera Assistance Fund, has bought the department 50 cameras for its 43 officers.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-running contract dispute between the Delaware River Port Authority and its police officers is headed back to court. Although a federal judge in February ruled that the DRPA must submit to binding arbitration, the sides can't agree on what the arbitrator is to decide or what limits can be placed on the arbitrator. Both sides outlined their positions in briefs filed Friday, and U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle will hear arguments next month. The bistate DRPA operates four toll bridges and the PATCO commuter rail line between South Jersey and Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In 2002, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to pass a law requiring all firearms retailers to sell "smart guns" instead of traditional handguns once the technology became available. On Thursday, the Democratic lawmakers who spearheaded that effort acknowledged that it had backfired by roiling gun-rights groups and impeding the technology from coming to market. So on Thursday, they introduced legislation they presented as a compromise: It would repeal the section of the law that would prohibit the sale of normal handguns but also require wholesale or retail dealers to offer and maintain an inventory of smart guns.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Atlantic City and the bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel are locked in an intensifying battle over as much as $30 million that Revel owes for property taxes and penalties. Atlantic City wants to sell the right to collect that money by auctioning a tax certificate on Dec. 11, but it can't do that without bankruptcy court permission. The city asked for that permission last month, saying it desperately needs the money to meet its budget. Revel's property-tax levy this year of about $38 million - based on an assessment of $1.15 billion - equals 19 percent of Atlantic City's $200 million in expected tax collections.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
By Karen Sacks As New Jersey legislators and policymakers focus on the need to help former inmates reenter society, it's important to note that one of the biggest hurdles is a legal one. And it's often a surmountable one. Legal assistance can make the difference between an ex-offender gaining a solid footing or returning to the behavior that led to prison. At Volunteer Lawyers for Justice (VLJ), which has been providing a wide range of free legal services to the economically disadvantaged for 15 years, we see this every day. Our Reentry Legal Services program provides the crucial link to make reentry possible, assisting nonviolent ex-offenders with legal counsel on issues ranging from driver's license restoration to expungement.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By David Porter, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - A sharply split New Jersey Supreme Court on Wednesday upheld a parental rights law that a couple claimed discriminates against infertile women. New Jersey law holds that an infertile man whose wife is artificially inseminated with his permission is the baby's father. But it doesn't give parental rights to an infertile woman whose husband's sperm is used to impregnate another woman, even if the wife gives permission. The Camden County couple used a surrogate, identified as A.F., to carry their child.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Next week, Burlington Township Police Department officers will add a tool to their arsenals: body-worn cameras. On Monday, five members of the local force will come to work with baseball-size cameras affixed to their blue uniform shirts. The more than three dozen remaining officers in the department will begin using the cameras by September, after completing individual training. A combination of capital funds and grants amounting to $68,500, including $22,000 from the state Attorney General's Body Worn Camera Assistance Fund, has bought the department 50 cameras for its 43 officers.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
By Karen Sacks As New Jersey legislators and policymakers focus on the need to help former inmates reenter society, it's important to note that one of the biggest hurdles is a legal one. And it's often a surmountable one. Legal assistance can make the difference between an ex-offender gaining a solid footing or returning to the behavior that led to prison. At Volunteer Lawyers for Justice (VLJ), which has been providing a wide range of free legal services to the economically disadvantaged for 15 years, we see this every day. Our Reentry Legal Services program provides the crucial link to make reentry possible, assisting nonviolent ex-offenders with legal counsel on issues ranging from driver's license restoration to expungement.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A three-judge appeals panel on Monday delivered a setback to a state election watchdog's efforts to pursue campaign-finance violations against a North Jersey Democratic power broker accused of misusing thousands of dollars. The Election Law Enforcement Commission had filed a complaint alleging that Essex County Executive Joe DiVincenzo used funds raised during his 2010 campaign for such things as a gym membership, paying a parking ticket, a television, and a trip to Puerto Rico.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Even if New Jersey does not pass new legislation that would let it take control of Atlantic City's finances, existing law gives the state the authority to do so, according to a memo prepared by the nonpartisan Office of Legislative Services. Under the 1947 law that let the state begin supervising the city in 2010, New Jersey could direct it to liquidate or refinance its debt, and has the power to approve new collective bargaining agreements. But the state could not dissolve existing agreements, the memo says.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Score another round to the City of Margate in its fight against Gov. Christie's efforts to construct a dune the length of New Jersey's 127-mile coast. Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez ruled Tuesday that Margate is entitled to a hearing in February on whether the state abused its eminent domain power in attempting to take 87 city-owned lots needed to construct a beachfront dune in the Shore town. He ruled that Margate had made a "sufficient showing of arbitrariness" on the part of the state to warrant a hearing on whether the state abused its power in trying to force the dunes on the city.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In 2002, New Jersey became the first state in the nation to pass a law requiring all firearms retailers to sell "smart guns" instead of traditional handguns once the technology became available. On Thursday, the Democratic lawmakers who spearheaded that effort acknowledged that it had backfired by roiling gun-rights groups and impeding the technology from coming to market. So on Thursday, they introduced legislation they presented as a compromise: It would repeal the section of the law that would prohibit the sale of normal handguns but also require wholesale or retail dealers to offer and maintain an inventory of smart guns.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Tuesday overturned New Jersey's sports betting law for the second time in two years, saying federal statutes forbid gambling on college and professional sports except in a handful of states. New Jersey voters amended the state constitution in 2011 to permit sports betting at struggling casinos and racetracks while barring wagers on New Jersey college teams or on any collegiate event occurring in the state. The National Collegiate Athletic Association, the National Basketball Association, the National Football League, and others sued to prevent implementation of the plan.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the rollout of FiOS nearing an end, the working-class residents of Laurel Springs, Somerdale, and Lindenwold wonder whether they will ever get to enjoy the latest Internet and TV products of Verizon Communications Inc. So far, Verizon has wired Cherry Hill and Haddonfield - more affluent communities - and county seat Camden for fiber-based Internet and TV. The telecom giant, in fact, has run FiOS through most of Camden County. For a complete map of the coverage area click here.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Over the seven months since New Jersey political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, were found mortally wounded amid a deliberately set fire in their central New Jersey home, the official opacity surrounding their deaths has been steadily stripped of every defensible rationale. Now that the conclusion of the criminal investigation is more than a month old, it's clear that the persistent secrecy serves only to cover up incompetence or worse. According to law and logic, continuing investigations are among the most compelling justifications for government discretion.
NEWS
April 17, 2015
ISSUE | CARRY PERMITS N.J. weapons case sounds a warning While its conclusions were off base, I'm confident the major effect of The Inquirer editorial on the Shaneen Allen case will be to advise Pennsylvania gun owners not to carry firearms to the Garden State - as they are likely to face serious charges for breaking New Jersey law ("Hair trigger," April 12). That's a public service that strengthens public safety. As to Allen, yes, she's a mother with a law-abiding background.
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