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NEWS
April 3, 2004 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey drunken-driving law inspired by the death of Navy Ensign John Elliott has been copied in a federal transportation bill that the U.S. House passed yesterday. An amendment would encourage other states to pass their own "John's Law" by offering them federal grants. Such a law gives police the authority to impound a drunk driver's vehicle. Elliott, 22, was killed July 22, 2000, in Salem County by a drunk driver who had been arrested earlier in the evening. Still intoxicated, the driver, Michael Pangle of Woodstown, N.J., was released to a friend who took him back to his vehicle.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the rollout of FiOS nearing an end, the working-class residents of Laurel Springs, Somerdale, and Lindenwold wonder whether they will ever get to enjoy the latest Internet and TV products of Verizon Communications Inc. So far, Verizon has wired Cherry Hill and Haddonfield - more affluent communities - and county seat Camden for fiber-based Internet and TV. The telecom giant, in fact, has run FiOS through most of Camden County. For a complete map of the coverage area click here.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - ExxonMobil Corp.'s chief lawyer on Wednesday defended the firm's tentative $225 million settlement with New Jersey in a pollution case, saying the $8.9 billion the state sought at trial last year was "devoid of any scientific or economic legitimacy. " New Jersey Democrats and environmentalists have attacked the Christie administration's proposed settlement as a sellout to polluters. Two state senators have vowed to try to block it in court. But ExxonMobil general counsel Jack Balagia said Wednesday that the state's initial $8.9 billion claim was based on a faulty report.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A recent decision by a federal judge not to dismiss a lawsuit against the Diocese of Camden for allegedly concealing the history of a priest accused of molesting three young girls has been hailed as a significant legal advance for abuse victims. U.S. District Judge Noel Hillman in late June denied a diocese request to dismiss the case. Part of the diocese's argument was that the statute of limitations had long expired. Hillman instead ruled that the case brought by Lisa Shanahan, 44, warrants consideration because New Jersey law has exceptions for the statute of limitations that typically expires when a child-abuse victim turns 20. Victim advocates say the decision is one of two in Camden federal court that show alleged victims of sexual assault are starting to win legal challenges previously lost because of New Jersey's narrow window for suing.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Early on the morning of Sept. 28, police and emergency workers responded to a fire at the central New Jersey home of John and Joyce Sheridan, where, we now know, they found the couple in their smoke-filled bedroom with fatal stab wounds. On searching the scene, detectives found two large kitchen knives, a length of melted metal, a half-empty gas can, and a box of matches. They also allegedly found cocaine, baggies, and a scale in a car at the home, which led to the arrest of one of the Sheridans' sons that day. Even if one of the dead were not a political figure as prominent as John Sheridan - who served four Republican governors before becoming the CEO of Cooper Health System, which is chaired by Democratic power broker George Norcross - New Jersey law dictates that most of the information above should have been released immediately.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a review by the state attorney general, the Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office announced Wednesday that it would allow a Philadelphia woman charged last year with illegally bringing into New Jersey a gun that was legally registered in Pennsylvania to enter a pretrial-intervention program and avoid jail time. The prosecutor's previous stance in the case involving Shaneen Allen, 27, was to make the case a "deterrent," either forcing a plea or bringing it to trial. The mother of two could have faced up to five years in prison.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 65-year-old Cherry Hill man has been charged with illegally possessing weapons and related charges after shots were fired inside his home early Friday afternoon. Stephen Menyhar, of the unit block of Tearose Lane, was inside the house when officers arrived just after noon, police said in a news release Saturday morning, which did not include a motive for the shooting. Shots had been fired inside the house, police said, and the department responded with a SWAT team and other units to surround the house.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-running contract dispute between the Delaware River Port Authority and its police officers is headed back to court. Although a federal judge in February ruled that the DRPA must submit to binding arbitration, the sides can't agree on what the arbitrator is to decide or what limits can be placed on the arbitrator. Both sides outlined their positions in briefs filed Friday, and U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle will hear arguments next month. The bistate DRPA operates four toll bridges and the PATCO commuter rail line between South Jersey and Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Atlantic City and the bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel are locked in an intensifying battle over as much as $30 million that Revel owes for property taxes and penalties. Atlantic City wants to sell the right to collect that money by auctioning a tax certificate on Dec. 11, but it can't do that without bankruptcy court permission. The city asked for that permission last month, saying it desperately needs the money to meet its budget. Revel's property-tax levy this year of about $38 million - based on an assessment of $1.15 billion - equals 19 percent of Atlantic City's $200 million in expected tax collections.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Mackay of Pitman saw some red flags before she bought a puppy almost two years ago from a dog broker in Salem County, particularly an inoculation record that didn't seem to come from a veterinarian. But Mackay adored the collie and decided to take it home for the holidays that December. By the time they got there, the dog, which Mackay had been told was in treatment for routine kennel cough, was vomiting and had diarrhea. "I should have known better," said Mackay, who has owned other dogs, including a collie mix. This month, the broker, Jessica Durkin of Salem, was sued by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office on behalf of four other dog owners who allege Durkin sold them sick puppies, including one so ill that the family had it euthanized.
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BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the rollout of FiOS nearing an end, the working-class residents of Laurel Springs, Somerdale, and Lindenwold wonder whether they will ever get to enjoy the latest Internet and TV products of Verizon Communications Inc. So far, Verizon has wired Cherry Hill and Haddonfield - more affluent communities - and county seat Camden for fiber-based Internet and TV. The telecom giant, in fact, has run FiOS through most of Camden County. For a complete map of the coverage area click here.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Over the seven months since New Jersey political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, were found mortally wounded amid a deliberately set fire in their central New Jersey home, the official opacity surrounding their deaths has been steadily stripped of every defensible rationale. Now that the conclusion of the criminal investigation is more than a month old, it's clear that the persistent secrecy serves only to cover up incompetence or worse. According to law and logic, continuing investigations are among the most compelling justifications for government discretion.
NEWS
April 17, 2015
ISSUE | CARRY PERMITS N.J. weapons case sounds a warning While its conclusions were off base, I'm confident the major effect of The Inquirer editorial on the Shaneen Allen case will be to advise Pennsylvania gun owners not to carry firearms to the Garden State - as they are likely to face serious charges for breaking New Jersey law ("Hair trigger," April 12). That's a public service that strengthens public safety. As to Allen, yes, she's a mother with a law-abiding background.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - ExxonMobil Corp.'s chief lawyer on Wednesday defended the firm's tentative $225 million settlement with New Jersey in a pollution case, saying the $8.9 billion the state sought at trial last year was "devoid of any scientific or economic legitimacy. " New Jersey Democrats and environmentalists have attacked the Christie administration's proposed settlement as a sellout to polluters. Two state senators have vowed to try to block it in court. But ExxonMobil general counsel Jack Balagia said Wednesday that the state's initial $8.9 billion claim was based on a faulty report.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Delaware River delineates a national gun divide. On one side, a young mother decided her best defense against violent crime was to buy a gun - no doubt the remedy envisioned by state legislators who have sought to punish her hometown, Philadelphia, for any attempt at gun control. But carrying the weapon across the river got her weeks in jail and, but for a belated outbreak of prosecutorial restraint, years in prison with the criminals she was hoping to fend off. Gov. Christie's recent pardon of Shaneen Allen ended her ordeal a year and a half later, but not before she became a cause célèbre for gun-rights activists and a challenge to gun-control advocates.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Early on the morning of Sept. 28, police and emergency workers responded to a fire at the central New Jersey home of John and Joyce Sheridan, where, we now know, they found the couple in their smoke-filled bedroom with fatal stab wounds. On searching the scene, detectives found two large kitchen knives, a length of melted metal, a half-empty gas can, and a box of matches. They also allegedly found cocaine, baggies, and a scale in a car at the home, which led to the arrest of one of the Sheridans' sons that day. Even if one of the dead were not a political figure as prominent as John Sheridan - who served four Republican governors before becoming the CEO of Cooper Health System, which is chaired by Democratic power broker George Norcross - New Jersey law dictates that most of the information above should have been released immediately.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie conditionally vetoed legislation Monday that would have repealed the mandatory suspension of driver's licenses for first-time drunk drivers and instead required them to install devices that would be able to detect alcohol and stop cars from starting. Christie returned the bill to the Legislature and proposed imposing both penalties on all drunken-driving offenders. "By combining our existing, rigorous system of mandatory license suspensions with the active monitoring provided by interlock devices, New Jersey will provide new hope in the fight against drunk-driving deaths and injuries," Christie said in his veto message.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Is Evesham Mayor Randy Brown acting like a jerk? That's just one of many questions left to linger at the South Jersey town's recent public meetings. Brown has acquired a degree of infamy by declaring that he and the rest of the Township Council would no longer answer residents' questions during meetings, as The Inquirer's Jan Hefler reported last week. While members of the public are still allowed to speak, any response or acknowledgment by officials has been deemed optional since January.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STATE WRITER
After nearly five years of planning and several weeks of end-stage test tumult, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) officially rolls out across New Jersey on Monday. Students in grades three through 11 in about 2,500 schools, charters, and other facilities statewide will take the controversial Common Core State Standards-aligned test. About three dozen of the state's approximately 600 school districts started administering the PARCC test early.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
On a mild morning back in October, four New Jersey governors joined a host of dignitaries and hundreds of other mourners at a memorial service for political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, near the Statehouse in Trenton. Former Gov. Christie Whitman remembered Sheridan as an "indispensable adviser": "You could count on him. " Democratic mover George Norcross, who employed Sheridan as chief executive of Camden-based Cooper Health System, declared that "his legacy will continue.
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