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NEWS
March 4, 2009
Leave it to New Jersey to be the only state without an official state song. The state that has produced Frank Sinatra, Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, and Wyclef Jean can't agree on a tune that will resonate with residents. Songs have been proposed and debated by state lawmakers for nearly 50 years. There have been contests and finalists selected - but no winner. Not even Springsteen's "Born to Run," which some might say fits to a T. The lawmakers need to turn up the volume and listen up. It's not the most important issue, but if New Jerseyans want a state song, they should have one. And it shouldn't take a complicated process or costly study to name the right tune.
NEWS
December 30, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sheba Grossman Sharrow, 80, of Cherry Hill, a painter and educator, died of complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Dec. 15 at her son's home in Mantua, Gloucester County. Mrs. Sharrow's surreal, expressionistic work was meant to be provocative, said her daughter, Mayda. The paintings often featured human forms with haunting faces. Art critic Fred Adelson wrote in the New York Times in 2002 that "her emotive images possess seductively beautiful layered surfaces, while their content conveys a profound sense of soul-searching, responding with indignation at man's brutality and compassion for society's hapless victims.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Between sips of peach-flavored iced tea at a local eatery, Luray Gross pondered the power of poetry. The image itself was poetic. "You walk very lightly through the world when that is your baggage. Words don't weigh anything, yet in other ways they have great weight," she said. Gross, 53, started writing poems in grade school, stringing together words in simple rhyming verses. She has since written two chapbooks and currently holds the honor of Bucks County poet laureate.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Louis Hau, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Students were calling a special workshop held recently at West Deptford Middle School "fun," "interesting" and "just cool. " What's up? Introduction to bungee jumping? Nope. The students are talking about - believe it or not - poetry. "I think it's fun," said Vita Picciurro, 12, a seventh grader from Mantua. "We get to write it from our point of view, and we don't have to write what other people tell us to. " Another seventh grader, Jason Dalton, 12, of Woodbury Heights, said he liked the creative outlet that poetry offered.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Conrad, 85, of New Hope, a painter, businessman, and professor emeritus of art at Rowan University, died Tuesday at Helene Fuld Medical Center in Trenton of injuries suffered in a car accident earlier that day in Hopewell, N.J. Born in Newark, N.J., Mr. Conrad was captivated by the arts at an early age. As a youngster, he began painting and taking photographs, later graduating from the High School of the Arts and Sciences in Newark....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gone are the days when Trenton was doling out huge grants to cultural and arts organizations across the state. More than $19 million poured out of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts to scores of groups in 1990. Art, music, dance and theater grew and thrived. Then came budget cuts, and the flood was reduced to a trickle. The council's giving was sliced 42 percent to $11.06 million in 1991, fell to $9.6 million in 1992, and hasn't exceeded $10.1 million since then. The arts and cultural community was devastated, especially in South Jersey, where corporate and foundation contributions had always been hard to come by and where competition from Philadelphia's venerable cultural institutions was strong.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A state Senate committee decided yesterday that the New Jersey State Council on the Arts has not provided a quarter of its funding to South Jersey arts groups as the legislature intended. The nonbinding resolution, which the Senate Legislative Oversight Committee passed with a 4-0 vote, urged the council to reevaluate all grant applications submitted for fiscal 2002, which starts July 1. "We want the budget and the arts council to be reflective of a 25 percent funding support for the eight southern New Jersey counties regarding the arts," said Sen. John Matheussen (R., Gloucester)
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alexander Zakharov was speaking Russian at a seemingly breakneck speed as the two classes of second graders at Mary Roberts Elementary School stared at the big man in wonder. Zakharov, an artist trained at the Kiev Art Academy, was teaching the children the Eastern European egg-painting art known as pysanky. His wife, Rosa, translated. "Try to do the same painting all the way around, the same color," Rosa Zakharov said. "You have about two hours so don't rush, don't rush. " To have two hours to devote to the arts is a rare gift in this era of super-tight school budgets.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Move it," barked Patricia Reid-Bookhart as two dozen girls of all heights, in leotards and tights of all colors, jumped, spun and practiced their jetes Monday in the basement studio of the Afro One Cultural Center in Willingboro. By Saturday night, their routines, smiles and aplomb must be perfected, for at 8 p.m. in the Willingboro High School auditorium, the curtain will go up on the Ninth Annual Black Arts Extravaganza. The program, in which about 65 people will perform, will chronicle three centuries of black life through song, music and dance.
NEWS
December 3, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to The Inquirer
State Sen. Walter Rand (D., Camden) was rankled when he learned that AT&T had awarded $500,000 in grants for the arts in North Jersey, but had overlooked the South Jersey cultural groups. So he wrote a letter to the telephone company complaining of the oversight. "I must say that AT&T was very responsive," Rand said last week at a news conference to announce the company's $31,210 grant to the Haddonfield Symphony. He called the grant, which will be used to pay for two concerts in March, "a major step in corporate financing of the arts in South Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 2009
Leave it to New Jersey to be the only state without an official state song. The state that has produced Frank Sinatra, Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, and Wyclef Jean can't agree on a tune that will resonate with residents. Songs have been proposed and debated by state lawmakers for nearly 50 years. There have been contests and finalists selected - but no winner. Not even Springsteen's "Born to Run," which some might say fits to a T. The lawmakers need to turn up the volume and listen up. It's not the most important issue, but if New Jerseyans want a state song, they should have one. And it shouldn't take a complicated process or costly study to name the right tune.
NEWS
December 30, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sheba Grossman Sharrow, 80, of Cherry Hill, a painter and educator, died of complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Dec. 15 at her son's home in Mantua, Gloucester County. Mrs. Sharrow's surreal, expressionistic work was meant to be provocative, said her daughter, Mayda. The paintings often featured human forms with haunting faces. Art critic Fred Adelson wrote in the New York Times in 2002 that "her emotive images possess seductively beautiful layered surfaces, while their content conveys a profound sense of soul-searching, responding with indignation at man's brutality and compassion for society's hapless victims.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Between sips of peach-flavored iced tea at a local eatery, Luray Gross pondered the power of poetry. The image itself was poetic. "You walk very lightly through the world when that is your baggage. Words don't weigh anything, yet in other ways they have great weight," she said. Gross, 53, started writing poems in grade school, stringing together words in simple rhyming verses. She has since written two chapbooks and currently holds the honor of Bucks County poet laureate.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The original picture was dark and foreboding, with all state funding for arts, culture and history wiped out to help control a cavernous budget gap. Now the image is hazy, with Gov. McGreevey's administration backtracking by pledging to try to restore at least half of the $18 million in arts grants that had been cut and to help find other sources of money. "There's a commitment that we'll find the money," said Eric Shuffler, counselor to the governor. "We want to do what we can to keep them going.
NEWS
January 26, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Looks can be deceiving. In a frieze above the entrance to the stately three-story limestone building, a fixture on Cooper Street in Camden since 1921, are the words "Cooper Branch Free Public Library. " But inside this neoclassical building fronting Johnson Park, it's a different story, as the Walt Whitman Arts Center carries out its mission: to provide a cultural-arts experience in an urban setting. Instead of row after row of books, the building's centerpiece is a 187-seat auditorium for such varied events as poetry readings, street-artist performances, concerts, dance recitals, film festivals, photo exhibits and poetry seminars.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Conrad, 85, of New Hope, a painter, businessman, and professor emeritus of art at Rowan University, died Tuesday at Helene Fuld Medical Center in Trenton of injuries suffered in a car accident earlier that day in Hopewell, N.J. Born in Newark, N.J., Mr. Conrad was captivated by the arts at an early age. As a youngster, he began painting and taking photographs, later graduating from the High School of the Arts and Sciences in Newark....
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A state Senate committee decided yesterday that the New Jersey State Council on the Arts has not provided a quarter of its funding to South Jersey arts groups as the legislature intended. The nonbinding resolution, which the Senate Legislative Oversight Committee passed with a 4-0 vote, urged the council to reevaluate all grant applications submitted for fiscal 2002, which starts July 1. "We want the budget and the arts council to be reflective of a 25 percent funding support for the eight southern New Jersey counties regarding the arts," said Sen. John Matheussen (R., Gloucester)
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
One of the biggest complaints that Msgr. Louis A. Marucci, executive director of the Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra in Camden, has with members of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts is that he rarely sees them. "There appears to be infrequent personal attendance by council members or their representatives at major South Jersey public performances," Msgr. Marucci said at a Senate Legislative Oversight Committee hearing in Trenton yesterday. "How can the council possibly judge the quality of artistic performance when their members or designees have not seen, heard or experienced a performance?"
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Bruce Curless was up on stage, raffling $5 tickets during intermission, promising the winner a home-cooked meal from one of his cast members. It's something Curless - producer and artistic director of the Ritz Theater in Oaklyn - has been doing often since the New Jersey State Council on the Arts turned the theater down for a $35,000 grant this year. "I just thought we had been unsuccessful in telling our story," Curless said last week of the council's pulling the plug on funding.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
United by a love for the arts, about 80 artists, academics, community leaders and other residents gathered Saturday morning to brainstorm about ways to infect others with their passion. The Camden County Summit on the Arts, sponsored by the county's Cultural and Heritage Commission and held at the Camden County Library, aimed to bring a wide range of people together to talk about what government and private organizations must do to expand support for artistic endeavors in the county.
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