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New Jersey Supreme Court

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NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Supreme Court is one of the most closely watched and well-regarded state courts in the nation, with a reputation for scholarly legal analysis and political independence. And as yesterday's decision opening the door to same-sex marriage showed, it certainly doesn't shy away from the difficult issues of the day. "There's just a long list of cases in which the New Jersey Supreme Court has been in the forefront, and often other states have fallen into place after the New Jersey Supreme Court paves the way," said Sally F. Goldfarb, a law professor at Rutgers School of Law in Camden.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Potentially ending a nasty development spat in Cherry Hill that has included two lawsuits, the township's mayor announced a tentative agreement Tuesday that would keep Woodcrest Country Club a golf course. The settlement also would immunize Cherry Hill against more litigation over past affordable-housing goals, under the state's Mount Laurel decision. Cherry Hill and the advocacy group Fair Share Housing Center have been involved in legal disputes for 30 years. Fair Share also signed off on the township's affordable-housing plans.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest twist on the continuing legal tangle over whether workers are defined as employees or independent contractors, the New Jersey Supreme Court said Wednesday that workers are considered to be employees unless the company can prove otherwise. The case, filed in 2010 in federal court in New Jersey, was closely-watched by business owners and unions. Three New Jersey men, two from the area, who delivered Sleepy's mattresses contended they were improperly classified as independent contractors, causing them to lose benefits and forcing them to cover expenses that should have been paid by Sleepy's L.L.C.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case brought by an open-government activist who contends that the public should be allowed to view electronic data and metadata kept by local government agencies. In summer 2013, John Paff requested a log of the emails sent by the Galloway Township police chief and the township clerk during a two-week period in June 2013, and then sued in an Ocean County court when his request was denied. A judge in 2014 ordered that the information be released to Paff, the chairman of the New Jersey Libertarian Party's Open Government Advocacy Project.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie got pushback Tuesday during a forum in Burlington County on his pitch to revamp New Jersey's school funding system, as he faced questions on how poor districts would absorb the cuts his proposal would necessitate. "You can't get blood from a stone," Sue Altman, an education consultant who recently moved to Camden, told the governor in Bordentown City. She questioned how Camden residents could compensate for the loss of most of their school district's state aid under Christie's plan, which the governor is promoting as a tax-relief measure.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Voorhees man, seriously injured in 2010 while trying to surf on a wave machine at a water park, can proceed with a gross-negligence lawsuit. Roy Steinberg, 52, filed a civil lawsuit against Sahara Sam's Oasis in Berlin, Camden County, saying workers failed to instruct him properly about how to surf safely on the FlowRider, and that the park did not adequately warn him about the risk of serious injury on the machine, which simulates ocean waves.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are the drivers who deliver Sleepy's mattresses employees or independent contractors? The outcome of a case argued Monday in New Jersey Supreme Court could have major ramifications for businesses and workers. "This argument is about more than my three drivers," said Anthony L. Marchetti Jr., the Cherry Hill lawyer who filed a lawsuit in 2010 on behalf of Sam Hargrove, Andre Hall, and Marco Eusebio. That's because appellate judges in federal court, where the case was originally filed, have asked New Jersey's Supreme Court to devise a test to be used to determine, in general, whether workers are employees or independent contractors under New Jersey state wage laws.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Former New Jersey Attorney General Robert J. Del Tufo, 82, of Princeton, who fought organized crime but was a prominent dissenting voice in the conduct of the Abscam political corruption investigation, died Wednesday of lung cancer, his family said. Mr. Del Tufo was the son of Italian immigrants and grew up in Newark, where his father ran a parking garage. He was the younger brother of Raymond Del Tufo, who served as U.S. attorney for New Jersey, a role Robert Del Tufo also filled as he rose through New Jersey's legal system.
NEWS
June 17, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defense lawyers who unsuccessfully challenged the use of a new device to test drunk drivers in New Jersey have taken their fight to the U.S. Supreme Court. After a three-year legal battle, the state Supreme Court ruled earlier this year that the Alcotest machine was scientifically reliable and allowed its test results to be used as evidence. The Alcotest has been rolled out across New Jersey to replace the Breathalyzer test. The defense lawyers cannot challenge the ruling that the device is reliable.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
At a time when the nation is digesting a stomach-churning lesson in the anxieties of constitutional crisis, it is hard to fathom how any lawmakers, no matter how myopic or arrogant, could sponsor legislation designed to create such a crisis. But that's what New Jersey State Assemblymen Michael Carroll and Guy Talarico did last week. The two Republicans from North Jersey are fed up with the state Supreme Court having the last, or next-to-last, word - especially since the court's word so often defies their druthers.
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NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the New Jersey Supreme Court to reopen the landmark case that for decades has been the basis for the state's school-funding system, seeking the right to break union agreements that he contends are harming students in poor districts. The governor, who has been pushing to redistribute school aid from urban to suburban districts, is arguing that the current funding system - grounded in the court's Abbott v. Burke rulings - hasn't sufficiently improved poorer school districts.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie got pushback Tuesday during a forum in Burlington County on his pitch to revamp New Jersey's school funding system, as he faced questions on how poor districts would absorb the cuts his proposal would necessitate. "You can't get blood from a stone," Sue Altman, an education consultant who recently moved to Camden, told the governor in Bordentown City. She questioned how Camden residents could compensate for the loss of most of their school district's state aid under Christie's plan, which the governor is promoting as a tax-relief measure.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Voorhees man, seriously injured in 2010 while trying to surf on a wave machine at a water park, can proceed with a gross-negligence lawsuit. Roy Steinberg, 52, filed a civil lawsuit against Sahara Sam's Oasis in Berlin, Camden County, saying workers failed to instruct him properly about how to surf safely on the FlowRider, and that the park did not adequately warn him about the risk of serious injury on the machine, which simulates ocean waves.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case brought by an open-government activist who contends that the public should be allowed to view electronic data and metadata kept by local government agencies. In summer 2013, John Paff requested a log of the emails sent by the Galloway Township police chief and the township clerk during a two-week period in June 2013, and then sued in an Ocean County court when his request was denied. A judge in 2014 ordered that the information be released to Paff, the chairman of the New Jersey Libertarian Party's Open Government Advocacy Project.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - The New Jersey Legislature on Monday sent Gov. Christie a $34.8 billion budget that for the first time in recent years attracted several votes from Republican legislators. The Democratic-controlled Legislature's budget, up $1 billion from the appropriations bill Christie signed into law a year ago, includes the same amount of spending the Republican governor recommended in his February proposal. The Senate voted, 28-11, with five Republican votes, to pass the measure, and the Assembly voted in favor, 50-27, late Monday.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Employers cannot discriminate or terminate workers for going through a divorce or separation, the New Jersey Supreme Court said in a ruling Tuesday. The decision stemmed from a case in which an employee of the Millville Rescue Squad in Cumberland County said he was fired in 2006 after telling a supervisor he was divorcing his wife - who also worked there - and having an affair with another coworker. Mario A. Iavicoli, who represented the former employee, Robert Smith, said Tuesday that the ruling was critical for the broader workforce in New Jersey.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Just how much affordable housing New Jersey must provide for in the decade ahead may hang in the balance Monday when an appeals panel convenes in Mount Holly's historic Olde Courthouse. Three judges of the Appellate Division are to consider whether municipalities have a persisting obligation to zone for all the housing units that went unapproved between 1999 and 2015. During that period, the state failed to devise a formula for calculating those obligations under the New Jersey Supreme Court's Mount Laurel decisions.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's revenues are projected to fall more than $600 million short of what is budgeted for the fiscal year ending next month, the state treasurer said Wednesday, in large part due to income-tax collections missing their marks. Acting Treasurer Ford Scudder told lawmakers that the Christie administration would fill the hole by shifting money from a number of areas that have underspent and cutting into the projected budget surplus. As for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, the administration has revised the $34.8 billion budget Gov. Christie proposed in February, reducing projected income-tax collections by $443 million.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has let stand a lower-court ruling that a Gloucester County family must pay part of a $4 million fine and a $2 million environmental cleanup cost after the family acquired a contaminated thermometer plant and converted it into a children's day-care center without removing the building's toxic mercury vapors. The decision last week not to hear the appeal caps a 10-year legal battle that started soon after the state Department of Environmental Protection discovered the Kiddie Kollege day-care center had opened in 2004 in an abandoned factory in Franklinville.
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