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NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
They don't necessarily like the term flea market for a new shopping, entertainment, and food venue coming in May to the grounds of the historic Atlantic City Race Course. If the Mercato Market resembles a flea market at all, say husband-and-wife creators Dirk DaCosta and Dina Guzzardo, it's one on a strong dose of steroids. They plan a weekly scene of musical acts, carnivals, and food-truck caravans to round out the offerings of 600 to 800 vendors. "I would say it is the outdoor market reinvented," DaCosta, 51, a business consultant by trade and a native of London, said last week as he and Guzzardo, a former mortgage broker, finalized plans for the mammoth undertaking.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
It's been nearly a year and a half since Superstorm Sandy devastated mid-Atlantic coastal regions. But thousands of New Jersey families still don't know if they will get enough aid to fix their homes. For the haphazard distribution of the first round of Sandy relief funds, the Christie administration is under well-deserved fire from state and federal legislators. A new round of $1.4 billion in federal money is coming, and the state should get it right this time. This is the administration's chance to change a pitiful story.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A City Council committee approved bills Thursday that would add electronic cigarettes to Philadelphia's smoke-free law and ban sales to minors, joining dozens of states and localities that are trying to slow fast-growing sales of a largely unregulated product in the absence of federal action. The known dangers of tobacco and the unknown long-term safety of e-cigarettes have split the public health community. Most of the physicians and scientists who testified at City Hall supported a prohibition on sales to minors.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fancy electric-car maker Tesla Motors Inc. is mulling its future in New Jersey , since the state Motor Vehicle Commission on Tuesday passed rules Tesla says will protect established car dealers and prevent it from opening planned company-run car stores. Texas , like New Jersey, has rules that make car companies sell through franchised dealers. So instead of company stores there, Tesla has "galleries," where it promotes cars but cannot disclose prices, or offer test drives.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Mary Pat Christie presented the award, once cameras stopped flashing and the crowd dispersed, Jodina Hicks - the latest "New Jersey Hero" - finally got to see the person who she says saved her life. Carter, age 4, ran up to his mother with flowers and a wide smile. "He was a big part of giving me something to really get up for," Hicks said Wednesday. My job "absolutely was, too, but on a very personal level, he was really what I needed, and me for him, too. " Hicks, executive director of Urban Promise, an award-winning youth services powerhouse in Camden with two private schools, after-school programs, and leadership, job-training, scholarship, and mentoring initiatives, became the 26th recipient of the New Jersey Heroes award and the first from Camden County.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) on Wednesday sharply criticized the Christie administration's handling of Hurricane Sandy relief programs, blaming Trenton, not Washington, for long delays in getting aid to homeowners. Menendez did not mention Gov. Christie by name, but in a hearing attended by two Democratic senators and no Republicans, it was clear he was trying to rebut the Republican governor's complaints that federal red tape was the biggest culprit slowing recovery from the 2012 storm.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tesla , the small but growing electric-car maker whose stock-market value has zoomed so high on hype that it is already worth half as much as auto giants General Motors and Ford , is blaming Gov. Christie for blocking its plans to bypass neighborhood auto dealers and sell cars directly to New Jersey drivers through company-owned stores in shopping malls. "Tesla is under attack in New Jersey," Diarmuid O'Connell , vice president of business development at Tesla, said in an open letter to the press Tuesday.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The news photographers, state officials, and wildlife specialists were lined up with cameras in hand, like paparazzi waiting for celebrities at a red carpet event. The big moment had arrived. A white sheet was pulled back from a large crate, and the top was removed to reveal an adult bald eagle, who spread his wings, then shot up into the sky over Winslow Township. A week earlier, the bird - with a six-foot wingspan - had been locked in a life-and-death struggle with another eagle over territorial claims in West Cape May, and was losing the fight when rescued by a state biologist.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Back in 2011, Gov. Christie bragged that the pension and health benefits deal he had cut with the Legislature was a "model for America. " It would save the benefits funds and save the state, and it had a cherry on top: It was the fruit of bipartisan cooperation. Now Christie is saying the same funds are poised to collapse and bring New Jersey down with them. And if the Legislature doesn't cooperate with his plan to solve the problem, he said at a recent town-hall meeting, "I'll have to take more extreme measures to deal with it. " Such bombast makes one wonder whether the governor is striving to draw attention away from investigations of the epic traffic jam caused by his aides.
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