CollectionsNew Jersey
IN THE NEWS

New Jersey

NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey hired a consulting firm for $1 million to help a panel convened by the states' two governors analyze the embattled agency. The contract with Promontory Financial Group L.L.C. raises the price tag of the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, which already had saddled taxpayers and toll-payers with millions of dollars in legal fees. Gov. Christie of New Jersey and Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York released the panel's 103-page report on the future of the Port Authority late Saturday in a joint news release in which they announced they had vetoed a proposed legislative overhaul of the agency.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Since New Jersey expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, its efforts to enroll thousands of low-income residents have been hampered by low staffing and antiquated technology. Gov. Christie championed the expansion, and, indeed, 300,000 New Jersey adults have enrolled in Medicaid, the federal program for the poor and disabled, since President Obama's health-care law took effect in October 2013. Many gained coverage directly through online state and federal portals. Yet an estimated 11,000 others, whom experts describe as some of the state's most vulnerable citizens, have received no response to their applications.
NEWS
December 29, 2014
ISSUE | CULTURE WARS Choice, feminism unfairly blamed Yet again, Robert W. Patterson blames the Supreme Court's decision to legalize abortion for America's seemingly intransigent economic problems ("Too many lack opportunities for success," Dec. 21). He also claims that feminism is a precursor to our economic doldrums. As in his past writing, Patterson does this without a shred of evidence, data, or viable anecdotes. He makes tired and meritless assertions while turning a blind eye to the positive economic news that is boosting the stock market and putting men and women back to work.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
David Samson, the former chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and a close ally of Gov. Christie, has dropped a lawsuit that sought to block a state ethics probe into alleged conflicts of interest between his role in a public office and the private business interests of his law firm. Samson and his firm, Wolff & Samson, withdrew their lawsuit Wednesday, court records show. Casey Woods, legal specialist for the state Ethics Commission, confirmed that the suit had been dropped but said he could not "comment on any open investigations.
SPORTS
December 23, 2014 | By Kevin Long, For The Inquirer
ARLINGTON, Texas - It's not as if the Dallas Cowboys have never had company from an A-list celebrity. Divas from Joey Heatherton to Carrie Underwood received all kinds of notoriety from their associations with "America's Team. " The latest nationally known fan to draw attention with an affinity to the Cowboys is Gov. Christie, who was in attendance for Dallas' 42-7 win Sunday against the Colts, much to the delight of owner Jerry Jones. "Frankly, he has the makings of a top football coach," Jones said.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at William Tennent High School didn't know what it takes to run a supermarket - until one opened on campus. Inside the Warminster school, a one-room ShopRite offers the snacks, drinks, and laundry detergent students and staff can buy at a bigger version of the supermarket a mile away. But this ShopRite - designed in the chain's signature red, yellow, and black - is about more than the customer. The mini-branch at Tennent, which opened in October, is part of an internship and career program aimed at giving students a taste of work in the real world.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jerry Byrd, 67, of Sewell, a former editor and reporter at The Inquirer, died Saturday, Dec. 20, at home after a long illness. Mr. Byrd, a native of Pittsburgh, was diagnosed with esophageal cancer about a year ago and had recently been in hospice, said his wife, Terry. "He was a fine writer and an excellent editor that inspired reporters," said Acel Moore, associate editor emeritus at The Inquirer. Moore said Mr. Byrd was "a good friend and a man who stood up for the right things.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
  As it considered whether to allow high-volume hydraulic fracturing in New York, the administration of Gov. Andrew Cuomo sought guidance from health officials on possible impacts to air and water quality. Pennsylvania officials also have studied possible health impacts of the technique known as fracking, but did so after the practice was well underway here. Was New York exercising more caution with the health of its citizens? Perhaps, but when Cuomo's administration announced Wednesday that it would ban the technique for extracting natural gas from shale deposits, analysts said the decision was as much about politics and economics as it was about health.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
After five years, New Jersey's pilot red-light camera traffic program came to a quiet end. But the debate continues on whether the controversial experiment improved safety or was just a cash cow for municipalities that raked in millions from frustrated motorists. Six municipalities in Camden and Gloucester Counties installed cameras at nine intersections in South Jersey under the program, which began in 2009. The cameras nailed hundreds of thousands of motorists blowing through intersections when the light was red. At $85 each, the citations pulled in millions of dollars in fines for more than two dozen municipalities, which were allowed to keep the bulk of the money to add to their coffers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Lost Tape Collective - a New Jersey-based label fueled by the sound of power pop-punk - holds its holiday showcase, it reveals the hidden charms and Christmas cheer of raging bands such as Tiny Moving Parts, Front Porch Step, State Champs, Light Years, and I Call Fives. Mostly, though, this holiday party shows off the good taste and fast-and-furious musicality of the band who function as the bosses of Lost Tape Collective, a band named Man Overboard. Before Man Overboard's 2008 start, Justin Collier and Zac Eisenstein were pals whose parents also happened to be pals, with everyone into classic rock.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|