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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware is opening its first medical marijuana dispensary Friday, three years after New Jersey took the leap in the region and allowed this type of business. First State Compassion Center is launching its new cannabis-growing and retail operation inside a former tile warehouse in a Wilmington industrial park. New Jersey has three dispensaries, including one in Egg Harbor Township, near Atlantic City. So far, 340 Delaware residents with qualifying ailments have registered to purchase a maximum of six ounces of cannabis a month, said Emily Knearl, a spokeswoman for the state Division of Public Health.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Democrats' top priority in passing a budget for the fiscal year that begins next Wednesday is to make a full contribution to the underfunded pension system for public workers. They have taken familiar steps to accomplish this, such as pushing legislation that would raise taxes on the state's highest earners and on corporations. Those components are part of a budget they advanced in committee Tuesday, setting up a full vote by the Legislature on Thursday. But Democrats also used a slick accounting maneuver to say they are making the full $3.1 billion payment for fiscal 2016, as was required by a 2011 law. (A state Supreme Court decision this month struck down that requirement.)
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Way back when, New Jersey was not the Garden State. It was the Kill or Be Killed State. And at the top of the heap was a fearsome creature called Mosasaurus , currently playing a memorable role in that new dinosaur flick you may have heard about. Mosasaurus was no dinosaur. It was a marine reptile, part of a broader family called the mosasaurs, in an era when much of New Jersey was underwater. While the toothy carnivores were common in much of the world, the first North American fossil specimens were found in New Jersey in the early 1800s, shaping our knowledge of prehistory well before anyone had a good idea what a dinosaur was. Fossil-hunters today continue to find mosasaur vertebrae and horror-movie teeth - some of them 5 inches long - at sites in Gloucester and Monmouth Counties.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - A federal judge here on Tuesday denied a motion by Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) to move his corruption trial from New Jersey to Washington. U.S. District Judge William H. Walls rejected almost all of Menendez's arguments in favor of holding the trial in Washington and said a Newark trial would be more convenient to Menendez's constituents. "Justice's workings, such as judicial proceedings, should be readily transparent when possible," Walls said in reading his opinion from the bench.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
New Jersey's highest court has noted that the state "can boast a long and proud tradition of . . . hostility to secrecy in government. " Now a state court can correct a glaring affront to that tradition. Secrecy surrounded the investigation of the violent deaths of New Jersey insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, from its earliest days in September, and it persists even now - more than two months after the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office closed the case. As a recent lawsuit on behalf of Inquirer journalists notes, officials continue to suppress records related to the crime "even though the investigation is over, even though it consumed countless public resources, and even though the Sheridan family has raised serious questions about it. " Filed in state Superior Court in Somerset County, the complaint asks that state and local authorities be ordered to release records related to the crime and the investigation.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Debate over a huge international trade agreement has scrambled the normal political allegiances on Capitol Hill and across the Philadelphia region. The city's three Democratic House members - usually reliable White House allies - have lined up against one of President Obama's top priorities. Typical political foes such as Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) have sided with the president. Toomey voted to give Obama "fast-track" authority that could help him complete the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he walked into Mary's Cafe in Maple Shade that June night 65 years ago, he was planning to get a late meal with friends. But as the time passed and no one waited on them, a pleasant evening turned ugly. Martin Luther King Jr., fellow seminary student Walter McCall, and their dates were confronted by the restaurant's gun-toting proprietor and forced to leave. King later recalled the incident in congressional testimony as one of the inspirations for the civil rights struggle he would lead.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly Pretzel Factory wants to take the distinct taste of the Philadelphia soft pretzel to the rest of America and around the world. Its first international store is set to open in Nassau in the Bahamas by the end of this month. The franchisee opening in Nassau already owns three pretzel stores in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. "I get e-mails all the time from people all over the world who want to open a franchise," said Tom Monaghan, Philly Pretzel's first chief development officer.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $1 million donation to Rowan University will help 50 low-income New Jersey students pay for their college educations, while a high school support program will help them get there. The donation comes from Robert O. Carr, who cofounded a Princeton-based credit-card processing company and started a scholarship program, Give Something Back Foundation, in 2001 in his native Illinois. "Rowan fits into our organization's goals and objectives: To have a school that's for working-class people, for students who are the first in their families to ever go to college.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie hasn't negotiated with other countries or shaped foreign policy. But he does claim one resumé detail to distinguish himself on national security ahead of a likely 2016 presidential run: the Patriot Act. Even as Congress scales back the law, Christie has been arguing forcefully for the tools given to law enforcement and intelligence agencies after 9/11 as crucial to prosecuting terrorists. Yet the importance of the Patriot Act in Christie's tenure as a prosecutor is less clear than he asserts.
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