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New Leaders

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NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By MICHAEL A. NUTTER
It's a frequent lament in the black community. There are no new, young African-American leaders. But who is responsible for this seeming void in new leadership? I believe that it is the old leaders. There is a responsibility in being a "leader" - to give something back to the community, to bring someone else along, to help people lift themselves up. Unfortunately, in many situations, the black community continues to suffer from the kind of leadership that is self-obsessed: It will not and cannot share power and fails to serve as mentors to ensure that well-groomed individuals take their place.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Gerald S. Williams
The Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP reelected president J. Whyatt Mondesire and 1st vice president the Rev. Carl Fitchett to two-year terms yesterday.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
WE DON'T care whether New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie runs for president. But we are inspired by the Republicans' willingness to keep recruiting candidates when the ones they have don't satisfy them. Here are recruiting offers we'd make: For schools chief: Phillies General Manager Ruben Amaro Jr. runs the best organization in town. Come on, Ruben! Hit a home run for education! For City Council: Replace them with the gang from "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. " Similar effectiveness, much more hilarity.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
"Moribund" is one way to describe the once-vigorous Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP. Now a new slate of younger leaders elected Saturday has the opportunity and obligation to responsibly rebuild the chapter, and help rekindle the nation's passion for progress on civil rights. During the 1960s, the Philadelphia chapter, with 60,000 members, was the strongest in the nation. But an internal fight led to a five-part split, which diminished the NAACP's influence and membership. Even after it was reunified in 1990, it was unable to attract young, vigorous members.
NEWS
June 2, 2004 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The new Iraqi leadership named yesterday is charged with moving the war-ravaged nation toward security, democracy and independence. Whether it can do that may rest largely on how well it can show that it is not merely a creature of the U.S.-led coalition. That is not likely to be easy, since the new leaders, like the Iraqi Governing Council before them, weren't elected, are backed by the Americans, and are mostly unfamiliar to Iraqis. Unlike the council, however, there are more technocrats, broader ethnic and sectarian diversity, and far fewer former exiles.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. William H. Gray III says the city will have to do without him in Congress so he can embrace a new mission: helping African-Americans get college educations. "To those who say that, with the loss of Bill Gray in Congress, prospects are dim for Philadelphia, I would strongly disagree," Philadelphia's most powerful congressman said yesterday as he announced his resignation to accept the presidency of the United Negro College Fund. Gray plans to resign Aug. 5 from the seat he has held since 1979 and start his new job - which really is chief fund-raiser for the non-profit organization - on Sept.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months before thousands should stream into its grandstands, the Devon Horse Show has been on the receiving end of an unlikely question for an event in its 119th year: Will the show go on? Such inquiries stem from more than a year of turmoil at the storied Main Line institution, including the departures of staffers and board members, whiffs of scandal, and a regime change. The nonprofit's new leaders - who came to power just before Christmas - say the upheaval is behind them.
NEWS
December 3, 1996
For the last year, the top brass of Philadelphia's School Board has been virtually invisible - hardly the vigorous, outspoken leaders the city and its 215,000 public school children desperately need. Yesterday, the board chose a new team, with the potential to unite its divided ranks and focus on the challenge of reforming and replenishing the nation's fifth-largest public school district. But the potential is also there for the kind of status-quo leadership that has contributed to the district's woes.
NEWS
January 24, 2007 | By Craig R. McCoy and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
While still taking stock of the damage allegedly done by the former president of the Independence Seaport Museum, the museum's new leaders say the institution is being transformed for the better. Since veteran president John S. Carter was fired early last year, the museum's fund-raising has tripled, a big gap in the operating budget has almost been closed, and an ambitious schedule of new exhibits has been set in motion. "The Independence Seaport Museum has come through a very difficult period, but we are on the mend," said Peter McCausland, the museum board chairman.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The governor, the mayor and some key Philadelphia leaders might be furious at last week's naming of two political appointments to run the troubled Convention Center, but the one group that has been blamed the most for giving the center a bad name isn't complaining at all. Carpenters' union leader Ed Coryell Sr. said Tuesday that the new board chairman, City Councilman Michael Nutter, and new chief executive officer, Convention Center board member...
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NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America, is holding its national convention in Philadelphia this week to select a new president and decide advocacy positions. The group, dedicated to women's health issues and supporting elite medical facilities in Israel, has 300,000 members nationally. "We empower women every day to take control of their health," said Patsy Gruenberg, copresident of Hadassah Greater Philadelphia, which represents 10,000 members in the region. About 350 members are attending the convention, which started Monday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill Hotel and will conclude Wednesday.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leaders of the Devon Horse Show pledged Tuesday to raise $8 million and implement a five-year plan to improve the institution's grounds. The plans emerged after a private meeting in which board members of the nonprofit discussed how to make the show more competitive in the equestrian world, chairman Wayne Grafton said. Among the proposed changes are expanded parking, grandstand improvements, and a new corporate and VIP sponsor section, he said. The show will also refinance its mortgage and use the equity to pay for improvements.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anuj Gupta landed a new job last Friday as general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, and the gig offers equal helpings of his two loves: public service and food. "It's hard to find a place in Philadelphia, let alone anywhere else, that offers you the quality and diversity of product, and affordability, that the terminal does," Gupta said during a walk-through this week. "It's this magnificent, historic place. People love it. " Gupta, who will start June 15, arrives at a critical juncture for the market, which dates to 1892.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months before thousands should stream into its grandstands, the Devon Horse Show has been on the receiving end of an unlikely question for an event in its 119th year: Will the show go on? Such inquiries stem from more than a year of turmoil at the storied Main Line institution, including the departures of staffers and board members, whiffs of scandal, and a regime change. The nonprofit's new leaders - who came to power just before Christmas - say the upheaval is behind them.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fresh off the construction of its gleaming, $100 million building expansion in University City, the Wistar Institute announced Thursday that it had appointed a new leader from within. Russel E. Kaufman, chief executive officer of the independent research institute since 2002, is stepping down in March to be succeeded by cancer biologist Dario C. Altieri. Altieri, 56, who left the University of Massachusetts in 2010 to head Wistar's cancer center and serve as the institute's first chief scientific officer, said that among his goals was the continued recruitment of top-notch faculty.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a quiet victory on a rainy Saturday, the results announced not to a cheering crowd but to a dozen people huddled under a sidewalk awning in North Philadelphia. Rodney Muhammad had been elected the new president of the Philadelphia NAACP, a victory that in past years might have guaranteed public adulation but that now promises mostly hard work. Muhammad, 62, takes over the leadership of a venerable organization torn by internal dissent, assuming local command amid national protest over the police killings of unarmed black men in New York City and Ferguson, Mo. "He's got a big job," said A. Bruce Crawley, a public relations executive who has known Muhammad for more than 20 years.
NEWS
December 11, 2014
  WITH PROFOUND apologies to Clement Clarke Moore   . 'Twas the month before New Year with a Wolf in the wings, And Pa. awaited his taxes and things. Republican leaders sat wringing their hands. Oh, what could they do to derail the Wolf's plans? The state of the state? A big fiscal mess. How best to fix it was anyone's guess. The Wolfman was ready, his team really eager, But prospects for GOP help looked so meager. "On Katie," called Wolf, "on Richman, Shapiro.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The government watchdog group Committee of Seventy has named the son of a former Pennsylvania governor as its new leader. David B. Thornburgh, executive director of the Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania, will take the helm in December. He replaces former Philadelphia Daily News editor Zack Stalberg, who retired in July after a nine-year run at Seventy. "David checked all of the boxes we were looking for in a CEO," Stephen S. Tang, search committee chair, said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Monell Chemical Senses Center, long known for its pioneering work on taste and smell, is getting a new director whose interests extend to other parts of the body. The research institute announced Monday that molecular biologist Robert F. Margolskee would assume the leadership role on Oct. 1, taking over from Gary K. Beauchamp, who is stepping down after 24 years. Margolskee, 59, studies the role of sensory proteins called taste receptors - so named because they were first found in the taste buds, but more recently discovered in the intestines, pancreas, and other organs.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Ballet, once a major national dance company, turned 50 this year and was in need of a makeover. It got an immediate jolt Tuesday when it named Angel Corella its new artistic director, effective in September. Corella, 38, a former principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre, is an international star who has performed with every major company around the globe. He's modeled for Rolex watches and appeared in ads for champagne with Gwyneth Paltrow. Most recently, he ran his own company, Corella Ballet Castilla y León, which became the Barcelona Ballet but which has since folded.
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