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New Leaders

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NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By MICHAEL A. NUTTER
It's a frequent lament in the black community. There are no new, young African-American leaders. But who is responsible for this seeming void in new leadership? I believe that it is the old leaders. There is a responsibility in being a "leader" - to give something back to the community, to bring someone else along, to help people lift themselves up. Unfortunately, in many situations, the black community continues to suffer from the kind of leadership that is self-obsessed: It will not and cannot share power and fails to serve as mentors to ensure that well-groomed individuals take their place.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Gerald S. Williams
The Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP reelected president J. Whyatt Mondesire and 1st vice president the Rev. Carl Fitchett to two-year terms yesterday.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
WE DON'T care whether New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie runs for president. But we are inspired by the Republicans' willingness to keep recruiting candidates when the ones they have don't satisfy them. Here are recruiting offers we'd make: For schools chief: Phillies General Manager Ruben Amaro Jr. runs the best organization in town. Come on, Ruben! Hit a home run for education! For City Council: Replace them with the gang from "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. " Similar effectiveness, much more hilarity.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
"Moribund" is one way to describe the once-vigorous Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP. Now a new slate of younger leaders elected Saturday has the opportunity and obligation to responsibly rebuild the chapter, and help rekindle the nation's passion for progress on civil rights. During the 1960s, the Philadelphia chapter, with 60,000 members, was the strongest in the nation. But an internal fight led to a five-part split, which diminished the NAACP's influence and membership. Even after it was reunified in 1990, it was unable to attract young, vigorous members.
NEWS
June 2, 2004 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The new Iraqi leadership named yesterday is charged with moving the war-ravaged nation toward security, democracy and independence. Whether it can do that may rest largely on how well it can show that it is not merely a creature of the U.S.-led coalition. That is not likely to be easy, since the new leaders, like the Iraqi Governing Council before them, weren't elected, are backed by the Americans, and are mostly unfamiliar to Iraqis. Unlike the council, however, there are more technocrats, broader ethnic and sectarian diversity, and far fewer former exiles.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. William H. Gray III says the city will have to do without him in Congress so he can embrace a new mission: helping African-Americans get college educations. "To those who say that, with the loss of Bill Gray in Congress, prospects are dim for Philadelphia, I would strongly disagree," Philadelphia's most powerful congressman said yesterday as he announced his resignation to accept the presidency of the United Negro College Fund. Gray plans to resign Aug. 5 from the seat he has held since 1979 and start his new job - which really is chief fund-raiser for the non-profit organization - on Sept.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months before thousands should stream into its grandstands, the Devon Horse Show has been on the receiving end of an unlikely question for an event in its 119th year: Will the show go on? Such inquiries stem from more than a year of turmoil at the storied Main Line institution, including the departures of staffers and board members, whiffs of scandal, and a regime change. The nonprofit's new leaders - who came to power just before Christmas - say the upheaval is behind them.
NEWS
December 3, 1996
For the last year, the top brass of Philadelphia's School Board has been virtually invisible - hardly the vigorous, outspoken leaders the city and its 215,000 public school children desperately need. Yesterday, the board chose a new team, with the potential to unite its divided ranks and focus on the challenge of reforming and replenishing the nation's fifth-largest public school district. But the potential is also there for the kind of status-quo leadership that has contributed to the district's woes.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
Embattled state Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin tried to install new leaders in Philadelphia's massive court system by pushing his colleagues on the high court to act before three new justices joined the bench this week. Chief Justice Thomas Saylor and two other justices confirmed Tuesday that Eakin had urged them to put new leaders in place last month, but said they rejected his proposal. Eakin's move would have cut the new justices out of a major decision, handing out a political plum right before they took office: oversight of the nation's fifth-largest court system.
NEWS
January 24, 2007 | By Craig R. McCoy and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
While still taking stock of the damage allegedly done by the former president of the Independence Seaport Museum, the museum's new leaders say the institution is being transformed for the better. Since veteran president John S. Carter was fired early last year, the museum's fund-raising has tripled, a big gap in the operating budget has almost been closed, and an ambitious schedule of new exhibits has been set in motion. "The Independence Seaport Museum has come through a very difficult period, but we are on the mend," said Peter McCausland, the museum board chairman.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Mary Livingston didn't need to utter a word. As an African American woman, her presence said it all. But she said what she came to say anyway. "We have really transitioned from the look of old, retired white guys," she told her audience one evening in May. Twenty women were participating in a retirement- planning course offered by the Women's Opportunities Resource Center. Livingston was there to explain how her business- mentoring organization, SCORE Philadelphia, was changing - starting with her appointment as its first female leader.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
The Fairmount Park Conservancy has named Rick Magder as its new executive director. Magder's post leading the nonprofit that raises funds for and preserves more than 10,200 acres of city park land is effective Sept. 1. He succeeds Kathryn Ott Lovell, who is now Philadelphia's Parks and Recreation commissioner. Magder has spent the past 16 years as a leader in the Groundwork movement, a network of organizations created by National Park Service and Environmental Protection Agency to focus on the relationships between urban open space, waterways and community renewal, according to the conservancy.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Julia Terruso, and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Kenney is expected to name Adam Thiel, Virginia's deputy secretary of veterans affairs and homeland security, as the next leader of Philadelphia's Fire Department, according to three sources with knowledge of the choice. Thiel, formerly the fire chief of Alexandria, Va., has worked in fire and emergency services for more than two decades in four states, according to a biography describing his current role in Virginia. He participated in response and recovery efforts for 9/11, Hurricane Gustav, Hurricane Isabel, and multiple blizzards, another online biography said.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Since 2002, Paul Steck had run Conshohocken-based Saladworks under two outsize personalities, founder John Scardapane and investor Vernon Hill . Steck guided the 100-store chain through last year's bankruptcy reorganization - the only way the company's advisers could see to end the fiscal impasse that had prevented the chain from growing - and its sale to Centre Lane Partners , a New York buyout firm. The battling bosses gone, he kept his title long enough to roll out the new prototype Saladworks store in Newtown Township, Bucks County, over the winter.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Jon R. Hall, assistant head of school and middle school head at the Montgomery School in Chester Springs, has been tapped to lead Westfield Friends School in Cinnaminson. Hall will become Westfield Friends head of school effective July 1, but will begin participating in the transition immediately. "It is our sincere pleasure to announce that our community has come together with great unity to select Jon Hall to be the next head of Westfield Friends School," said Peter Taylor, clerk of the Westfield Friends school board.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
After a six-month nationwide search, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has selected a new president from Philadelphia's nonprofit and business communities. Matt Rader - who has held leadership roles with the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust and the business improvement district that helped revitalize East Passyunk Avenue - will be the 37th president of the nonprofit that runs the world's largest and oldest indoor flower show. Rader, 37, holds a master's degree in business administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
Embattled state Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin tried to install new leaders in Philadelphia's massive court system by pushing his colleagues on the high court to act before three new justices joined the bench this week. Chief Justice Thomas Saylor and two other justices confirmed Tuesday that Eakin had urged them to put new leaders in place last month, but said they rejected his proposal. Eakin's move would have cut the new justices out of a major decision, handing out a political plum right before they took office: oversight of the nation's fifth-largest court system.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Liz Dow
My favorite childhood book, Goodbye, Mr. Chips , tells the story of a beloved British boarding school teacher who taught two generations of boys and watched them grow into men with fame, fortune, and families. I loved the way he helped these boys build character and was in position long enough to watch the fruits of his labors grow. Year after year, Mr. Chips instilled the same lessons in his students and watched as each, in his own unique way, turned these lessons into a life. Little did I know that my feelings for these fictitious growing boys - who went off to war, or to serve in Parliament, or to raise sons whom Mr. Chips would teach - foreshadowed the sense of wonder and pride I've experienced after more than 20 years of running Leadership Philadelphia, which develops executives' skills and mobilizes them to serve.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Halfway through fifth period, Christine Black stood in the middle of a vast ground-floor hallway in George Washington High. At either end, small knots of students clustered with no apparent destination or permission to be out of class. But the fact that seven or so students were lingering actually represented good news - their ranks were down sharply from the congregation that likely would have gathered the week before, said Black, a new coprincipal of the school. "Still," she said, "the hallways should be clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yet another charming, youthful conductor has arrived on classical music's doorstep. The 31-year-old Bulgarian Stilian Kirov, fresh from the associate conductorship of the Seattle Symphony, has promptly filled the void left by Symphony in C's departing longtime music director, Rossen Milanov. Kirov's debut concert Saturday at the Gordon Theater at Rutgers-Camden raised a lot of questions that will be answered only in future concerts, but one thing was clear: He is maintaining the orchestra's high standard of playing.
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