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New Lease

NEWS
August 2, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some were veteran customers, some were tourists or conventioneers, and some just wanted to be there on the day Rick Olivieri cooked his last steak sandwich at Reading Terminal Market. But that day wasn't yesterday and probably won't be today. The stalemate between Olivieri and management of Reading Terminal Market remained yesterday with Olivieri doing a booming first day of business without a lease, and market officials letting him be while starting the legal eviction process and waiting for the next move in Olivieri's lawsuit against them.
NEWS
August 1, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Olivieri left his corner of the Reading Terminal Market yesterday without a lease, at times fighting tears, and promising to be behind the grill at Rick's Philly Steaks when the lunch crowds return today. The predicted end of the long-running drama between Olivieri and management of the historic market came and went, as T.S. Eliot said, not with a bang but a whimper. Olivieri's lawyer had sued to avoid eviction, but, as of late yesterday afternoon, there was no hearing and no court order.
NEWS
July 28, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Management at the Reading Terminal Market yesterday reaffirmed its decision not to give a new lease to steak-sandwichmaker Rick Olivieri. Market spokesman Kevin Feeley said officials of the nonprofit Reading Terminal Market Corp. spent the last week explaining the rationale for their decision to merchants and others, as well as giving Olivieri a final hearing on Wednesday. "Following all of these measures, the board reaffirmed the decision not to renew the lease," Feeley said.
NEWS
July 13, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A majority of members of the Reading Terminal Merchants' Association unanimously approved a resolution yesterday supporting a new lease for veteran steak sandwich maker Rick Olivieri. Michael Holahan, interim president of the group representing the 76 merchants in the 104-year-old Center City market, said that more than 50 merchants were represented at the meeting and that the vote supporting the resolution was unanimous. Olivieri, owner of Rick's Philly Steaks, was told by market officials on June 28 that his lease would not be renewed and that he had to leave by July 31. Officials announced that he would be replaced by a South Philadelphia competitor, Tony Luke's Old Philly Style Sandwiches.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the last vestiges of airline-industry regulation ended yesterday with the expiration of the carriers' 32-year leases on gates at Philadelphia International Airport. Starting today, the long-term agreement between major airlines and the city Commerce Department's Division of Aviation is being replaced with five-year leases that give the airport more control over its 120 gates, airport officials said. Air travelers will notice no immediate change, but in the coming months, the pact is expected to give two carriers more gates.
SPORTS
March 31, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
NASCAR officials have signed a new lease that will keep stock-car racing at Daytona International Speedway through 2054. The lease will also raise the rent paid for the famed speedway, which is now about equivalent to the cost of a one-bedroom apartment. Daytona International Speedway's annual rent payments for 447 acres of public land will jump from the $10,000 established in 1957 to help get the racetrack built to $500,000 with regular future increases. Tennis Andy Roddick hit another bump in his bid to shake an early-season slump yesterday, losing to David Ferrer, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, in the quarterfinals of the Nasdaq-100 Open in Key Biscayne, Fla. In a night match, defending champion Roger Federer rallied from a break down in the opening set and beat No. 9-seeded James Blake, 7-6 (2)
SPORTS
October 8, 2005 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Fly Lite makes her second career start in tonight's second race at the Meadowlands, few will take notice, and all but a handful of bettors will quickly dismiss the chances of the 5-year-old chestnut mare. But to those who know her best, the fact that the mare is still alive to compete in her new profession is enough. Fly Lite was to begin her racing career earlier this year at Penn National Race Course near Harrisburg, but her trainer was dissatisfied with the way she was training and sold her to a farm where she would be used as a casual riding horse.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just when it seemed that Skippack's historic Hunsicker Farmhouse might end up a memory, a local district court judge has stepped in to save it. Albert Augustine, a lover of old houses, has agreed to pay $25,000 for the 171-year-old farmhouse. He estimates that he will spend $300,000 to refurbish it for residential use. The purchase means that the structure, which stood vacant for the last three years next to land being developed for townhouses, wins permanent reprieve from the wrecker's ball.
NEWS
August 1, 2004
Philadelphia has done an impressive job of retaining 82 of 83 corporate leases that were due to expire over a three-year period, thanks to a major assist from the big guy in Harrisburg. The latest major firm to sign on to a lease extension with the city until the year 2016 is the Towers Perrin management consulting firm. While handling that chore, city commerce director Stephanie Naidoff has also considered the next challenge: What must the city do to lure new corporate investment to this high-tax, high-labor cost metropolis.
NEWS
June 27, 2003 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
A new partnership, a new name, and a $7 million rehab is helping to make an older Maple Shade rental community brighter and more affordable. "What they did was marvelous," said Lawrence Salvatoriello, 76, a 10-year veteran of The Arbors, formerly known as Kings Highway Towers. Salvatoriello moved from North Jersey with his mother, who lived with him until she died a few years ago. "We chose this building because the location is excellent. You can go anywhere from here, and there's a park across the way where we used to go to watch the ducks and birds," said Salvatoriello, a security guard at an Atlantic City casino.
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