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New Lease

NEWS
August 1, 2004
Philadelphia has done an impressive job of retaining 82 of 83 corporate leases that were due to expire over a three-year period, thanks to a major assist from the big guy in Harrisburg. The latest major firm to sign on to a lease extension with the city until the year 2016 is the Towers Perrin management consulting firm. While handling that chore, city commerce director Stephanie Naidoff has also considered the next challenge: What must the city do to lure new corporate investment to this high-tax, high-labor cost metropolis.
NEWS
June 27, 2003 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
A new partnership, a new name, and a $7 million rehab is helping to make an older Maple Shade rental community brighter and more affordable. "What they did was marvelous," said Lawrence Salvatoriello, 76, a 10-year veteran of The Arbors, formerly known as Kings Highway Towers. Salvatoriello moved from North Jersey with his mother, who lived with him until she died a few years ago. "We chose this building because the location is excellent. You can go anywhere from here, and there's a park across the way where we used to go to watch the ducks and birds," said Salvatoriello, a security guard at an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
May 30, 2003 | By ELMER SMITH
IT'S NOT exactly business as usual. But thanks in part to our readers, Dignity Housing is still in business. The non-profit agency, which provides subsidized housing and social services mainly to formerly homeless families, was on the verge of homelessness itself when we first reported its plight here six weeks ago. They were suffering from the same fiscal strains that most non-profits have in this shaky economy. And they had the added burden of having to maintain an aging housing inventory on reduced funding as the city and other donors, facing their own fiscal strains, slashed their funding.
NEWS
November 7, 2002 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Bush got what he wanted on Election Day - a Republican Senate, a Republican House, and a humiliated Democratic Party - and now he plans to flex his newfound muscle on Capitol Hill, to rescue his agenda from congressional limbo. He put his prestige on the line in this election. His gamble paid off, and now he wants to reap the rewards: Permanent tax cuts, a conservative federal judiciary, a patients' bill of rights with a cap on lawsuits, a prescription-drug plan run privately, an energy plan that allows drilling in the Alaskan wildlife preserve, and a Department of Homeland Security staffed in part by nonunion workers.
NEWS
January 8, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A dispute between a Methodist church and an affiliated nursery school that forced the extension of the school's winter vacation was resolved, at least temporarily, with the school reopening yesterday under a new name and with a new lease. After 20 years at the Hopewell United Methodist Church in Guthriesville, the Hopewell School became the Brandywine School yesterday. Its new lease will run through May, the end of the school year, school officials said. After that, the church and school will split, a decision that follows a dispute over the school's staffing and the church's desire for the school to increase its religious curriculum.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
What's so funny? It surely isn't TV sitcoms, which have become a broadcast stepchild in recent years, overshadowed by drama and then by "reality. " But this fall, there are some changes in the air. Seven of the 15 new comedies on the broadcast networks, a higher percentage than ever, have discarded aged TV conventions, especially the traditional "three-camera" format, unchanged since it was popularized by Lucille Ball in the early '50s. Using flashback and fantasy, computer-generated screen elements and changing perspectives, these shows have a fresh look that could lure viewers back to a decaying form.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2001 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a love story that began during the Vietnam War and has been played out in remote jungles and over icy terrain around the world. Four decades later, it is heating up more than ever this summer at the Jersey Shore. The suitors say much good could come from the affair - among other things a valuable new tool for combating famines and plagues. But this is really a story about a few guys who fell in love with an airplane that they flew or fixed in Vietnam - the twin-engine DeHaviland Caribou, a cargo and passenger transporter.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | by Phyllis Furman, New York Daily News
MGM, the "Hannibal" studio, is looking to devour the box office with the most ambitious slate of films in the history of the studio. Following the stellar debut of "Silence of the Lambs" sequel "Hannibal" last weekend, the once given-up-for-dead studio wants to reclaim its lost stature in Hollywood by releasing 20 star-studded, high-profile films this year - more than three times its output last year. " 'Hannibal' kicks off a film slate the likes of which MGM has never had before," MGM vice chairman Chris McGuirk told the New York Daily News.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | By Ovetta Wiggins, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Six words - "No shame, no blame, no names" - are etched across a picture of a pink-and-blue baby blanket. Framed on posters hung in high schools, social-service agencies and hospitals across New Jersey in recent weeks, the message is aimed at a small but troubled group of mothers: those who would abandon their babies. The posters call attention to a law passed in New Jersey last summer that allows anyone to leave an infant no more than 30 days old at a hospital emergency room or with police, no questions asked.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until the 1940s, the rustic train station along tree-lined South Broad Street served as a community hive, with excited travelers buzzing through 19th-century doors and waiting on historic platforms. For more than 50 years, neighbors in the heart of Kennett Square's historic district have been watching the station transform. What was once a gateway to the world became a less-welcoming, freight-only station and, finally, an abandoned building with debris rusting in the yard. But now, if all goes well, neighbors can look forward to a change.
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