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NEWS
July 9, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Before the Oxford Valley Mall and the ubiquitous supermarkets, before the warehouse-discount stores and the sprawling car lots, when development was something that happened to children, there was the Styer Farm. Begun in 1910 as a family enterprise, Styer Farm on Woodbourne Road grew into a Bucks County icon synonymous with apples and pies and pumpkins and lazy summer afternoons in the countryside, attracting folks from as far as Philadelphia and Trenton. "It's a community landmark," said farmer Bob Solly, who manages the 80-acre orchard.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia rents are traditionally seen as a Filene's Basement bargain when compared to the Saks Fifth Avenue rents charged in New York. That was especially true in the early '90s, when the apartment rental market was as soft as a slice of fresh Wonder Bread and vacancy rates were hovering around 86 percent or lower. Landlords were plying new tenants with offers of free rent on the first and last months of their leases or long leases of three to five years without rent hikes.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
"The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated. " - Mark Twain in a cable from Europe to the Associated Press. Three months after it was declared as dead as old King Tut, the Devon moviehouse has sprung with alacrity from its grave. It's alive and as well as can be expected, considering its recent ordeal. The Devon remains at the same old stand on Frankford Avenue at Stirling Street in Mayfair, thanks to a Herculean effort on the part of impresario Gene Denicolo.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Maple Shade company took ownership of Burlington Center yesterday from the Rouse Co., the retail-development titan that built the mall 17 years ago. Jager Management completed the deal for the 670,000-square-foot mall about 2 p.m., said Richard Wenderoth, the general manager. Wenderoth, who would not comment on the purchase price, said he wanted to bring in more national and regional retailers, generate more foot traffic, improve customer service, and "get the place cleaned up. " The Rouse Co., of Columbia, Md., has decided in recent years to focus on developing and expanding its regional shopping centers with more than one million square feet that "dominate the market," company spokeswoman Nancy Tucker said.
REAL_ESTATE
October 15, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 1890s, the Lincoln was a "residential hotel" - then-fashionable housing for people of fashion. By the 1960s, the Lincoln, along with the neighborhood, had lost its shine. As the Seamen's Church Institute, the quietly distinguished building at Locust and Camac Streets provided inexpensive lodgings for sailors, serving 60,000 men a year, according to Ken Hinde of the Foundation for Architecture in Philadelphia. Today, a refashioned Lincoln again provides cosmopolitan residences to Center City's up and coming.
SPORTS
May 27, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The first goal was lucky. But then came two more, which left the Colorado Avalanche seeing Stars. Joe Nieuwendyk had a goal and two assists, and Ed Belfour posted his sixth career playoff shutout as the visiting Dallas Stars beat Colorado, 3-0, last night to take a 2-1 series lead. "We got the home-ice advantage back," said Dallas forward Jamie Langenbrunner, who scored the Stars' second goal. "That was important to us. " Game 4 of the best-of-seven Western Conference final series is scheduled for tomorrow night in Denver.
REAL_ESTATE
April 9, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Presidential City Apartments, Philadelphia Until a year ago, Cornelia and Simon Gregory lived in a single home in the Philadelphia area . . . but family members, including their two daughters and four grandchildren, live in Virginia, Maryland, Ohio and California. "That's why we moved to an apartment," said Cornelia Gregory, a retired teacher. "We can walk out, close the door and leave without a worry. " It's also one of the reasons they chose Presidential City Apartments.
NEWS
April 15, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A mostly vacant shopping plaza, where for years truck drivers have pulled in for a snooze, has been given permission to wake up. When the strip of stores on Street and Knights Roads does stir again, developers promise, it will be more beautiful and energetic than before. On Monday, the Bensalem Township Council unanimously approved plans by Vornado Realty Trust of Saddlebrook, N.J., to tear down a boarded Bradlee's department store, a closed Shop Rite market and other vacant shops to make way for a Kohl's department store, a yet-to-be-secured supermarket-chain tenant, and possibly two other businesses.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last summer, Pathmark Stores Inc. closed one of its branches in Cherry Hill and another in Voorhees, two of South Jersey's most affluent communities. It did so while investing $7 million in enlarging and modernizing its lone store in economically depressed Camden. The store, on Mount Ephraim Avenue, is slated for a "grand reopening" event on Sunday, to show off such additional features as a full-service Summit Bank branch. The company said it had hired 70 more people, bringing the store's workforce to 170. Pathmark spokesman Richard Savner offered a simple explanation of the company's decision to go against the trend of businesses curtailing their operations in inner cities and expanding in the suburbs: "Customers in Camden have been loyal to Pathmark and have made that a viable operation for us. " In contrast, the Cherry Hill store off the former Ellisburg Circle and the Voorhees store on Route 73 were under-performers, he said.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a warm yellow now, but until recently historic Ridgeland in West Fairmount Park was just another white elephant. Long vacant except for a few park offices, not architecturally notable enough to be a museum restoration candidate, Ridgeland - dating in part to 1719 - seemed destined to languish and decay as have many other Fairmount Park homes. But in a turnaround that park and preservation officials say could be a model for other park houses, Ridgeland found a new purpose and an agency willing to restore it. The park got a functioning landmark instead of an eyesore, and hundreds of people are drawn into West Fairmount who otherwise might never have come.
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