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New Lease

NEWS
January 8, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A dispute between a Methodist church and an affiliated nursery school that forced the extension of the school's winter vacation was resolved, at least temporarily, with the school reopening yesterday under a new name and with a new lease. After 20 years at the Hopewell United Methodist Church in Guthriesville, the Hopewell School became the Brandywine School yesterday. Its new lease will run through May, the end of the school year, school officials said. After that, the church and school will split, a decision that follows a dispute over the school's staffing and the church's desire for the school to increase its religious curriculum.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
What's so funny? It surely isn't TV sitcoms, which have become a broadcast stepchild in recent years, overshadowed by drama and then by "reality. " But this fall, there are some changes in the air. Seven of the 15 new comedies on the broadcast networks, a higher percentage than ever, have discarded aged TV conventions, especially the traditional "three-camera" format, unchanged since it was popularized by Lucille Ball in the early '50s. Using flashback and fantasy, computer-generated screen elements and changing perspectives, these shows have a fresh look that could lure viewers back to a decaying form.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2001 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a love story that began during the Vietnam War and has been played out in remote jungles and over icy terrain around the world. Four decades later, it is heating up more than ever this summer at the Jersey Shore. The suitors say much good could come from the affair - among other things a valuable new tool for combating famines and plagues. But this is really a story about a few guys who fell in love with an airplane that they flew or fixed in Vietnam - the twin-engine DeHaviland Caribou, a cargo and passenger transporter.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | by Phyllis Furman, New York Daily News
MGM, the "Hannibal" studio, is looking to devour the box office with the most ambitious slate of films in the history of the studio. Following the stellar debut of "Silence of the Lambs" sequel "Hannibal" last weekend, the once given-up-for-dead studio wants to reclaim its lost stature in Hollywood by releasing 20 star-studded, high-profile films this year - more than three times its output last year. " 'Hannibal' kicks off a film slate the likes of which MGM has never had before," MGM vice chairman Chris McGuirk told the New York Daily News.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | By Ovetta Wiggins, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Six words - "No shame, no blame, no names" - are etched across a picture of a pink-and-blue baby blanket. Framed on posters hung in high schools, social-service agencies and hospitals across New Jersey in recent weeks, the message is aimed at a small but troubled group of mothers: those who would abandon their babies. The posters call attention to a law passed in New Jersey last summer that allows anyone to leave an infant no more than 30 days old at a hospital emergency room or with police, no questions asked.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until the 1940s, the rustic train station along tree-lined South Broad Street served as a community hive, with excited travelers buzzing through 19th-century doors and waiting on historic platforms. For more than 50 years, neighbors in the heart of Kennett Square's historic district have been watching the station transform. What was once a gateway to the world became a less-welcoming, freight-only station and, finally, an abandoned building with debris rusting in the yard. But now, if all goes well, neighbors can look forward to a change.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Before the Oxford Valley Mall and the ubiquitous supermarkets, before the warehouse-discount stores and the sprawling car lots, when development was something that happened to children, there was the Styer Farm. Begun in 1910 as a family enterprise, Styer Farm on Woodbourne Road grew into a Bucks County icon synonymous with apples and pies and pumpkins and lazy summer afternoons in the countryside, attracting folks from as far as Philadelphia and Trenton. "It's a community landmark," said farmer Bob Solly, who manages the 80-acre orchard.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia rents are traditionally seen as a Filene's Basement bargain when compared to the Saks Fifth Avenue rents charged in New York. That was especially true in the early '90s, when the apartment rental market was as soft as a slice of fresh Wonder Bread and vacancy rates were hovering around 86 percent or lower. Landlords were plying new tenants with offers of free rent on the first and last months of their leases or long leases of three to five years without rent hikes.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
"The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated. " - Mark Twain in a cable from Europe to the Associated Press. Three months after it was declared as dead as old King Tut, the Devon moviehouse has sprung with alacrity from its grave. It's alive and as well as can be expected, considering its recent ordeal. The Devon remains at the same old stand on Frankford Avenue at Stirling Street in Mayfair, thanks to a Herculean effort on the part of impresario Gene Denicolo.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Maple Shade company took ownership of Burlington Center yesterday from the Rouse Co., the retail-development titan that built the mall 17 years ago. Jager Management completed the deal for the 670,000-square-foot mall about 2 p.m., said Richard Wenderoth, the general manager. Wenderoth, who would not comment on the purchase price, said he wanted to bring in more national and regional retailers, generate more foot traffic, improve customer service, and "get the place cleaned up. " The Rouse Co., of Columbia, Md., has decided in recent years to focus on developing and expanding its regional shopping centers with more than one million square feet that "dominate the market," company spokeswoman Nancy Tucker said.
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