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New Museum

NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
OLD CITY Demolition is just weeks away, and $102 million has been raised or pledged for the $150 million Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia's historic district, officials said at a ceremony Wednesday at Third and Chestnut Streets. Former Gov. Ed Rendell, who helped choose the museum site and who has assisted with fund-raising, stood amid costumed reenactors under a chilly morning sun to herald the new tourist attraction and solicit more donors for a museum that would be the only one of its kind in the nation when it opens in 2016.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Cold infused the large hall. No heat on a winter's day. But for those working to erect a large tent within the building, temperature did not matter. Their focus was on the task at hand - the first rollout and setup of a made-to-order replica of George Washington's field tent, his wartime "marquee," an icon of the nation-to-be. The Museum of the American Revolution, which now owns the visitor center at Third and Chestnut Streets and plans to demolish it to erect a new museum, had the replica made to determine how best to erect and display the original, now a fragile relic.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
About 8 a.m. Thursday, in gusty winds, the Bicentennial Bell - a six-ton 1976 gift from the one-time mother country to the people of the United States - was lifted from its home in the Independence Park bell tower at Third and Chestnut Streets, and lowered slowly onto two red steel pedestals at street level. A few hours later, held firmly by yellow hoists attached to a yellow crane, it was lifted again and guided into a great crate, to be trucked away to storage. Independence National Historical Park officials must now mull where the bell's next permanent home will be. The dramatic move from the 130-foot tower at the northern end of the old visitor-center site also marks the most public evidence that change is coming.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The first clue that a new museum here is a bit unusual are the door handles shaped like the Greek letter pi . Then there is the elevator. The ground floor is designated with a zero, and the basement is marked "negative one. " And the projected number of visitors in 2013? "Six times 10 to the fourth," said executive director Glen Whitney, a former hedge fund analyst and assistant math professor. That's 60,000 for those who are a bit rusty on their exponents, but both the rusty and the number-savvy are welcome at the National Museum of Mathematics, said to be the only such museum in North America.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
For the Philadelphia tourism industry, the consummation devoutly to be wished has arrived at last. The reopening of the Rodin Museum last weekend, its original character sensitively restored, completes the longed-for "museum mile" along the Parkway that tourism promoters hope will prove to be an irresistible magnet for the culturally motivated. The Rodin, the new museum of the Barnes Foundation next door, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art a few blocks west certainly create a destination worth a special journey, as the Michelin guides would put it. The question now is whether this new synergy will benefit all three museums, particularly the Rodin.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The Oneida Nation of New York was an early ally of George Washington's Continental Army, so it's entirely fitting that the nation now comes to the aid of raising a Philadelphia museum exploring the struggle for American independence.   Two centuries ago, the Oneida brought bushels of corn to starving troops at Valley Forge. Today, they're bringing millions of dollars — in the form of a $10 million grant announced last week at an event in Washington, cheered by officials of the American Revolution Center, the group that is developing the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
The years-long campaign to launch a museum in Philadelphia honoring the soldiers of "America's original ‘greatest generation' " reaches another milestone Tuesday. Having secured a prime location two years ago at Third and Chestnut Streets in the city's historic district, the museum planned by the American Revolution Center now has a dignified, red-brick design by renowned architect Robert A.M. Stern that should offer visitors an inviting setting both day and night, given its distinctive, lighted cupola.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Amy Worden and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GETTYSBURG — For decades the electric map show was as much a part of the Gettysburg National Military Park experience as the battlefield itself. Generations of visitors — among them President Dwight D. Eisenhower and British Field Marshall Sir Bernard Law Montgomery — took a 20-minute trip back in time to witness the progression of Union and Confederate troops over the course of the three-day battle in July 1863. There was no Disney animation, no interactive display.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Nicholas M. Tinari Jr
By Nicholas M. Tinari Jr.   The opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery in Philadelphia raises two emotions for me. The first is anger at the gross betrayal of Albert Barnes' remarkable gift, and the second is sadness — for something truly unique is gone, not only an art collection in the perfect setting, but an original idea. Barnes established the foundation in 1922 with an Indenture of Trust to ensure its primary function of systematic education through direct interaction with the art collection.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press
NEW YORK - One of the art world's most recognizable images - Edvard Munch's The Scream - sold Wednesday for a record $119,922,500 at auction in New York City. The 1895 artwork - a modern symbol of human anxiety - was sold at Sotheby's. The buyer's name was not released. The image of a man holding his head and screaming under a streaked, blood-red sky is one of four versions by the Norwegian expressionist painter. The auctioned piece at Sotheby's is the only one left in private hands.
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