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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Many of the city's ensembles and presenters are holding back their flashiest programs until after the opening of the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in December. But no halfway intrepid listener need go begging in the meantime. Especially the new-music fan. The Network for New Music, those smart and stalwart reporters from the composition front, premiere Richard Wernick's The Name of the Game with new-music guitarist David Starobin on Oct. 21 and 28. Another contemporary guitar work, this one by Christopher Rouse, gets a workout with Sharon Isbin and Orchestra 2001, Sept.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like a perfect storm, three big new-music events are simultaneously converging on Philadelphia, all but unbeknownst to one another. June's unofficial new-music festival has the Opera Company of Philadelphia giving the U.S. premiere of Hans Werner Henze 's Phaedra June 3-12 at the Kimmel Center, while the company's former chorus master, Donald Nally, unfurls his Month of Moderns Festival with the Crossing choir June 5, 18, and 26 at Presbyterian Church...
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | By Will Rose, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Joseph Franklin was tasting a local beer in a cafe near the old town square and talking about how the Philadelphia ensemble of which he is artistic director could be a catalyst for change. "We're reaching out," he says of Relache, whose musicians are devoted to new music. "American musicians - Americans in general - spend too much time looking at their navels. We've got to look outward, too. There's a changing world out there. " Here in the heart of Europe, where the future is being delivered daily, the Prague Spring Music Festival is one cultural piece of that transition.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | Reid Kanaley
Discovering new music that's to your liking is simple and fun with the help of a few well-chosen applications for your smartphone. Shazam, by Shazam Entertainment Ltd., is a free app for Apple and Android that does one fine trick. Say you are out and about, and hear a song you like. Shazam will listen to a few seconds of music, identify the song, and link to all sorts of information about it. You can "tag" a song and share it on Facebook and Twitter, or send your find by e-mail to anyone or to your "Shazam friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
Matthew Greenbaum, speaking to his audience Friday night, said he didn't intend "gradual eradication of the living performer. " Yet that was the general effect of his Fourth Book of Motions (1992). Played by saxophonist Marshall Taylor at the Network for New Music's concert at the Philadelphia Art Alliance on Rittenhouse Square, the piece pits sounds generated by a human being against those spewed forth by a tape. As Greenbaum pointed out, the technique is nothing new. Stemming from technology first used by Pierre Schaeffer nearly 50 years ago and further developed by dozens since then, the idea is to explore the similarities and differences between electronic and acoustic sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
In the post-Valentine's Day spirit, we're "speed dating" new album releases today. _ PJ Harvey, "Let England Shake" (Vagrant, A-): Polly Jean puts varied voices to missives about the downfall of Britain and aftershock of war. You scare me, girl. Gotta see you again. _ Cowboy Junkies, "Demons: The Nomad Series Volume 2" (Latent/Razor & Tie, B+): Margo and Michael Timmins ease access to the dark ruminations of the severely crippled (and now sadly departed) singer/songwriter Vic Chestnutt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Settlement Music School's Contemporary Players are a prime example of how music performance has changed over the centuries. By establishing a regular performance schedule, the ensemble and the sponsoring school are committing themselves to performance of new music in a sustained way. Two hundred years ago, every musician made a living playing new music. Had some formed a group to play music that had been popular a century earlier - by, say, Bach or Telemann - they would have been seen as strange, and in need of patronage from a similarly eccentric archduke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
"Trans-Sonic: A Festival of New Music" this weekend offers two nights of the experimental sounds that have come to be called "new music. " New music's pioneering use of synthesizers and other electronic hardware has yielded an intricate, abstract music whose sound ranges from the lush and densely layered to the spare and minimalistic. "Trans-Sonic" features both local and national figures prominent within the genre. Tonight, the Mikel Rouse Broken Consort makes its Philadelphia debut.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Composer-arranger John Zorn, whose band Naked City launches the New Music at Annenberg Center series Monday, has a personality split between at least two conflicting approaches to music. For contemporary-classical ensembles such as the Kronos Quartet, Zorn creates pieces that incorporate "found" sounds, record-scratching and rock motifs. These somewhat formally composed pieces have won him praise for redefining the boundaries of "traditional" string-quartet music. For more improvisation-oriented groups, of which the five-piece Naked City is one stripped-down representative, he works in the moment by creating an environment in which snips of narrative, sparring guitars, blood-curdling screams and dramatic movie-score melodies rip and run over agitated, funk- influenced rhythms.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | By Peter Burwasser FOR THE INQUIRER
It should not be surprising that four composers born in China and now working in America would utilize techniques of both Eastern and Western musical cultures. What is not so usual, but was apparent in Sunday's Network for New Music concert, is that all have created music of uncommon drama, introspection and spirituality. With the composers in attendance at the Settlement Music School in Queen Village, the concert began and ended with music of great momentum and coloristic variety.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
Despite having been part of post-punk indie-goddess ensembles Throwing Muse, Breeders, and Belly - the dramatic '90s dream pop band she has recently reunited - Tanya Donelly doesn't have time for legacy management. "I mean, it makes me feel a little bit old," Donelly says with a laugh at having just received her AARP card ("I want those discounts, man"). "Heritage, yes. Of course I'm proud of all of those bands and that time. Wow. But I'm too busy with my kids and the music. All of that stuff was a product of being with the right people - and the cross-pollination of Boston's tight musical families.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Kesha Rose Sebert - the artist known as Kesha - hit Atlantic City's Harrah's Casino on Saturday night for the debut of both that hotel's new Waterfront stage and her world tour, it was not without controversy or shouts of "Free Kesha" from her look-alike tween fan base. It also was filled with the cocky chanteuse's usual bravado-laden attitude and snide singsong approach to her hits. Famously, the 29-year-old singer-songwriter has had things rough since her last album, 2012's Warrior . The platinum-plated, electro-pop artist with a burgeoning punk edge and an occasional C&W lilt put her career on hold (or had her career put on hold)
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Is artistic freedom worth the price of artistic isolation? The answer for Philadelphia composer Michael Hersch looks better when considered over the long term. After early successes in the 1990s with expressionistic orchestral works performed under the likes of Mariss Jansons, Hersch has long gone against neo-tonal trends and in ways that have only intensified over the last five years. For some, he's one of the few out there able and compelled to speak in unvarnished truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There are entire horror movies that aren't as unnerving as the opening credits to John Carpenter's Halloween . What's so eerie, and sets the tone for a film that has become a revered horror classic and spawned too many better-left-unmentioned sequels, isn't the slow zoom into the firelit face of a menacingly grinning jack-o'-lantern. It's the insistent, jittery score, a simple piano melody repeating over a menacing drone. Like the film itself, that memorable music is the work of John Carpenter, who composed the scores for many of his own films.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
With so much musical hardware on the Perelman Theater stage, is there still room for a Prism Quartet? That was a valid question last week, and it will be again at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, for the 32-year-old Philadelphia saxophone quartet, which has an appetite for collaborating with ensembles requiring much stage real estate. Last week, they played with the modern percussion ensemble So Percussion. On Saturday, they will perform with a Los Angeles group known simply as Partch, which plays versions of the exotic instruments invented by maverick composer Harry Partch (1901-74)
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Releasing your super-secret, heretofore not-known-to-exist album with absolutely no advance notice to surprise the internet and snap the music world to attention? That's soooo early 2016, like something Kendrick Lamar would have done - and did, with his unexpected Untitled Unmastered - way back in March, for goodness sake. The new strategy, it seems, for fans trying to to figure out how they can actually listen to new music by their favorite acts, is a little different. Instead of ambushing them out of the blue - as Beyoncé did in 2013 when she revealed her previous, self-titled album with a midnight Instagram post - you tease with a hint beforehand, so fans can be ready to convene for a virtual listening party.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Milton Babbitt (1916-2011) is one of the most infamously experimental American composers of the 20th century - but he hasn't exactly been a magnet for posthumous idolization. So Network for New Music seemed admirably fearless with a Sunday concert titled "All the Things He Was," showing why some consider the Philadelphia-born composer deeply misunderstood. With his thick black glasses and slightly smug smile, the über-modernist Babbitt seemed to treat music like mathematical rocket science.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Anyone interested in the future of new music in the city might have paid close attention to Timothy Weiss' dates last weekend with Orchestra 2001. The ensemble's search for a new artistic leader hasn't exactly gone as planned - snow prevented one candidate's appearance, and another withdrew - but Weiss reminded listeners this was less a search for conducting competence than for taste. It's safe to consider Sunday night's program at Christ Church Neighborhood House an expression of Weiss' interest in a particular aesthetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Tom Di Nardo, For The Inquirer
'We want the public to hear great music at prices they can afford. " That has been Anthony Checchia's mantra, whether founding the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society 30 years ago, or presenting concerts 25 years before that. The society has become the largest presenter of chamber music in the country, now giving 60 concerts of major artists each season. It insists on prices from $18 to $24 (with a $4 Kimmel Center fee for shows at its Perelman Theater), though the same concert in New York a few days later goes for three times that.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | By Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
R&B singer Tinashe is no longer on the come-up: She's arrived. Lately, the 23-year-old vocalist killed her Janet Jackson tribute at the 2015 BET awards, posed for Playboy's first no-nudity issue, and made a fan of Kanye West. She's in the middle of her Joyride World Tour, a precursor to her sophomore album, Joyride . She'll perform Tuesday at the TLA. With more than 40 shows to go, it's her day off - kind of. She slept in this day and is relaxing, a fan meet-and-greet on the horizon.
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