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NEWS
September 2, 2005
AS NEW ORLEANS turns from a natural disaster to a human disaster, some are asking the farsighted question: Should the city be rebuilt? House Speaker Dennis Hastert yesterday told a suburban Illinois newspaper that on the issue of federal assistance in rebuilding New Orleans "We ought to take a second look at it. But you know we build Los Angeles and San Francisco on top of earthquake fissures and they rebuild too. Stubbornness. " Hastert is now facing some harsh criticism for suggesting that the Big Easy should be allowed to remain a big pond.
SPORTS
March 22, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Ben Crenshaw converted a fast start into a 5-under-par 67 and a 2-stroke lead yesterday in the third round of the $500,000 USF&G Classic in New Orleans. Crenshaw birdied three of the first five holes, sinking a 20-footer on the 5th. He also dropped a 25-footer for a birdie on the 10th, then played the last eight holes in par. Ronnie Black was second after shooting a 69 for a 203 total. Tom Watson, a two-time winner in New Orleans, moved up with a 66 that put him in a four-man group at 204, 3 shots back going into today's final round.
SPORTS
May 13, 2014
THE SECONDARY had its best game of the season as the Soul heads into a crucial stretch of the schedule with a 79-60 win over New Orleans on Saturday at the Wells Fargo Center. Rayshaun Kizer and James Romain had two interceptions, each returning one for a touchdown, to lead the season-best scoring outburst. The Soul's defense came into the game with just three interceptions in the first seven games. V'Keon Lacey chipped in a special-teams TD on a fumble recovery. Running back Derrick Ross scored three touchdowns and Dan Raudabaugh threw five scores and no picks as the Soul evened its record to 4-4. New Orleans fell to 1-6. The Soul hosts Tampa Bay (3-5)
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cardinal John Krol was hospitalized in New Orleans on Sunday when he suffered "a weak spell" after celebrating a Baccalaureate Mass that morning at Xavier University, aides said. Cardinal Krol, 76, leader of the Philadelphia archdiocese's 1.35 million Catholics, was listed in stable condition yesterday at Hotel Dieu Hospital, where he was undergoing tests, hospital spokeswoman Kathleen Brown said. "I am authorized to say only that he is in stable conditon," Brown said. "He came in because of weakness.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
MANY OF the plans for rebuilding the Gulf Coast beg the question, who decides? Who pays is also important. And so is who gets paid. But the fundamental "who decides?" question will determine the answers to all the others. Pundits have now offered just about every possible option for the rebuilding, including exactly as it was, no rebuilding at all, a Key West or Venice tourist museum, a 21st-century model city. I favor the Venice strategy. It seems the best way to face all the competing realities, including preserving the historic areas, which were least affected by the flooding and will be the most missed by the world; creating, largely from scratch and on higher ground, a modern economic metropolis to exploit the advantages of sitting between the Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico, and restoring the Delta ecosystem to help tame the consequences of the next big storm.
SPORTS
November 20, 1990 | By Gwen Knapp, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Mike Jensen contributed to this article
Levan Alston, the point guard who helped Simon Gratz win the Public League boys' basketball championship last season, yesterday signed a letter of intent to attend the University of New Orleans. Another area player, Kevin Lewis, a 6-foot, 11-inch senior at Glen Mills, will sign a letter of intent tomorrow to attend the University of Rhode Island, Glen Mills coach Tom Mann said yesterday. Lewis played only three games for Germantown High last year before leaving the team and has yet to play a game for Glen Mills; he attracted college attention while playing in the Sonny Hill League this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Spike Lee's When the Levees Broke may not be the most joyous gift you could give this holiday season, but it might be one of the most important. The three-disc set is not only the most personal account of the unnatural disaster that hit New Orleans, it is also the most complete. Lee's documentary, shown on HBO, is as much an indictment of local, state and federal officials as it is a tribute to the people of the Big Easy and their endurance in impossible and horrific circumstances.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
We're planning to visit New Orleans soon, and have two questions: How can we tour the cemeteries there, and what's the weather like at this time of year? B.S., Elkins Park New Orleans' cemeteries are famous for their above-ground crypts, necessary because of marshy ground in the delta city. The structures and inscriptions can be very interesting, and some of the cemeteries hold dignitaries. Among them are St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, 400 Basin St., with the remains of Etienne de Bore, the city's first mayor, and Marie Laveau, a 19th-century voodoo queen.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Big Easy," a suspense drama starring Dennis Quaid, Ellen Barkin and Ned Beatty. Directed by Jim McBride. Screenplay by Daniel Petrie Jr. Running time: 96 minutes. A Columbia release. At area theaters. The Big Easy" is New Orleans. You know, the town where "dancing's a way of life. " The town where "folks have a certain way of doing things. " The town that's "a marvelous environment for coincidences. " When characters in a movie are as dead set on defining their city as the ones in "The Big Easy" are, you know you'd better pay attention; chances are that the town's supposed characteristics are meant to tie into the theme of the movie.
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SPORTS
January 14, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
ISH SMITH doesn't keep a suitcase packed at all times, have a plane ticket ready for anywhere in the country or sleep with a phone next to his head. Yes, the 76ers' starting point guard is very familiar with being uprooted during his six-year NBA career. But he doesn't let it rule his days or his career. Smith is about as easy-going as anyone you will come across. He can be self-deprecating one minute and then quiet and serious the next (though that doesn't usually last for very long)
BUSINESS
January 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frontier Airlines will add flights to 10 new cities from Philadelphia this spring, among 42 new routes nationwide announced by the Denver-based airline on Thursday. Flights from Philadelphia International Airport to New Orleans; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; and Indianapolis will begin April 14. Nonstop flights to Nashville, Cleveland, and St. Augustine, Fla., will start April 15. Frontier will begin flying to Cincinnati on May 13, to Austin, Texas, on May 15, and to Kansas City, Mo.; and Milwaukee on June 2. One-way fares on the new routes were advertised on the airline's website, flyfrontier.com, as low as $59 to $99 Thursday.
NEWS
January 5, 2016
NEW ORLEANS police say a driver apparently hit a pedestrian in the city's French Quarter and dragged the body more than 6 miles, crossing a Mississippi River bridge to the other side. Police say a driver found the disfigured body about 3:30 a.m. Friday in the road leading from the bridge. A police Facebook posting says investigators believe the body is that of an unidentified pedestrian hit in the French Quarter. It says witnesses told investigators a black sedan with tinted windows struck the man and drove off. Officer Garry Flot, a police spokesman, said in an email yesterday that police don't have further leads to the car or driver.
SPORTS
January 5, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
MAKEOVERS in the Hollywood area are about as common as disappointing pro sports seasons here in Philadelphia. So it's a little bit ironic that the 76ers come back from a 11-day, six-game road trip out west with a team that only slightly resembles the one that last played here on Dec. 22, when it lost to visiting Memphis. In that 104-90 loss to the Grizzlies that seems so long ago, coach Brett Brown was still juggling the point guard position as Kendall Marshall was just coming back from offseason surgery for a torn ACL on his right knee and Tony Wroten was just a couple of games in from his return due to the same injury.
SPORTS
December 11, 2015 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
THE CHATTER around the fantasy football taproom this week was heavy on the Buccaneers. Should I start Jameis Winston? Where does Mike Evans rank? How about that Rastafarian guy at tight end? Uh, that's Austin Sefarian-Jenkins. While the Bucs are building a nice foundation in Tampa (life's good when there's a franchise quarterback in the building), many of this week's fantasy questions are more because of whom the Bucs are playing. The Saints got rid of defensive coordinator Rob Ryan after giving up 324 yards and four TD passes to Kirk Cousins in Week 10, but their generosity has continued.
SPORTS
December 4, 2015 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S THE obvious answer, but Chip Kelly put it perfectly. The Patriots - despite losing Dion Lewis, Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola and now Rob Gronkowski - continue to hum along. They scored 24 points last weekend on the road in the snow against a solid Denver defense without a receiver or a running back reaching 100 yards. How do they manage such efficiency, despite losing all those weapons? "Did they lose Brady?" Kelly asked jokingly. They did not, which is the primary reason New England averages 31.5 points per game.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It has been a while since I've seen Black Nativity , perhaps not since the last time Ozzie Jones directed it for Freedom Theater. Theatre Horizon's version of this Afrocentric holiday tradition is a joyful, noisy alternative to all those grim Dickensians and cynical elves. Written as a "gospel-song play" by the great Langston Hughes, it puts the Christ squarely back in Christmas, with a first act placing the manger in pre-diaspora Africa, and a second act in the present day. But there's so much latitude in its meager script and song choices that every production can be drastically different.
SPORTS
November 16, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
How good are the New York Giants? That question has been asked often at various times during the 21st century, and chances are whoever answered got it wrong. The 2007 and 2011 Giants are the examples every middling playoff contender holds up, saying: "See, if you get in, you can win. " And now it appears coach Tom Coughlin has another one of those teams. This, of course, matters to the Eagles, because they also appear to have one of those teams, and it's entirely possible that only the team that survives the race to win the NFC East will get into the playoffs.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Allen Toussaint, 77, the New Orleans songwriter and pianist responsible for a long list of hits recorded by artists that included Aaron Neville, Ernie K-Doe, Irma Thomas, Bonnie Raitt, Glen Campbell, Dr. John, Lee Dorsey, Warren Zevon, Robert Plant, Robert Palmer, and Devo, died of a heart attack Monday after a concert in Spain in the midst of a European tour. Tributes poured in from across the music world. "He was one of the most gentle, loving, and wise people I've ever known," Raitt wrote.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SERVING UP BANANAS laced with marijuana to rhesus monkeys on an island in the Caribbean - all in a day's work for Jon Greene. Well, not exactly, but Jon was the cameraman recording the effect of this unusual repast on the unsuspecting primates as part of a study. Jon, who spent most of his life behind a camera, mostly with Philadelphia's Channel 10, had been hired for this project by a researcher from the Dorothea Dix psychiatric hospital in Raleigh, N.C. It involved lugging heavy cameras onto the island off Puerto Rico, tramping through the jungle, dodging an irate ape that threatened to attack, and setting up the cameras to record the pot-eating monkeys' reactions compared with a control group that got a regular monkey diet.
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