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NEWS
August 4, 2005
AMID THE abundant sunshine of the season comes a ray a sun from an otherwise cloudy place: the Fairmount Park Commission. The commission is expected any moment to announce the appointment of Mark Focht as acting executive director. Focht, 44, who has been with Fairmount Park for eight years, has directed the ecological restoration and environmental education of the park. He administered the Natural Lands Restoration Program funded with a $26 million grant from the William Penn Foundation, and is considered smart, savvy and energetic.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
No nibbling at the corners, or messing with curveballs. Here's a fast pitch, right down the middle: If Philadelphia wants to keep the Phillies and Eagles forever, it'll have to build a new stadium. Since there's only money for one and the teams won't share it, the stadium ought to be built for baseball - and it ought to be in Center City. Why should a city just a sigh of relief away from bankruptcy build a new sports palace when it has a serviceable stadium already? Because, if it doesn't, some day sooner than you think, either the Phils will flee or the Iggles will fly. And, however you judge the system of values this implies, losing either team would be a severe psychic wound for this region, a loss of binding civic energy.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The idea has been kicking around for 40 years - a full-fledged park along the east bank of the Schuylkill in Center City. Now - to the surprise even of its sponsors - it appears to be on the way. The federal government has awarded $1,672,000 to the nonprofit Schuylkill River Development Council, which took up the park crusade just last year. That money - along with an anticipated $418,000 matching grant from the city - will pay for the construction of a 12-foot-wide asphalt path for hikers, walkers, bicyclists and joggers.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
The Moorestown Township Council voted unanimously last night to proceed with the Hartford Road Park. "This was a vote for the children who play sports in this town," said Greg Newcomer, chairman of the Hartford Road Park committee. Tom Bottger, whose architectural firm designed the park, said construction could begin in the spring. The park plan includes four playing fields, two of which will be lighted, two "tot lots," and running paths, parking and restroom facilities.
SPORTS
April 5, 2012 | Associated Press
MIAMI - The sellout crowd in the Miami Marlins' new ballpark cheered the introduction of their starters, who were accompanied by women dressed as Latin showgirls. There was another roar for Muhammad Ali, who delivered the first pitch. Then Kyle Lohse and the World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals went to work, and the place grew quiet. Lohse held Miami hitless until the seventh inning and pitched into the eighth to help the Cardinals win the first game in Marlins Park, 4-1, Wednesday night.
SPORTS
May 28, 2004 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walk into a major-league clubhouse these days. Identify yourself as being from Philadelphia. This is what you'll hear: "Wow, the ball is really jumping up there. " Those were the words of Atlanta Braves pitching coach Leo Mazzone recently. Many others have echoed his remarks. It will take several years to accurately determine if Citizens Bank Park is the Coors Field of the East. But based on early returns, it certainly is a place that has the look of a home-run haven.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on her 55-foot-tall sculpture at the tip of a spit of land on the Delaware at Washington Avenue, artist Jody Pinto peered down the river and thought of her father and grandparents arriving at the same spot from Italy nearly a century ago. The sculpture, entitled Land Buoy , a silver spire with a spiral staircase wrapped around it, is the focal point of Washington Avenue Pier, a new park, which opened Friday morning where a million European...
NEWS
March 9, 2012
THE SYMBOL of our squandered, inaccessible Delaware waterfront is not so much the presence of the big-box stores like Walmart, but what lies directly behind Walmart: a hurricane fence plastered with large "No Trespassing" signs (and plastered, as well, with trash). That fence and those signs say everything about how we have, until recently, treated one of the city's great treasures, especially people's access to that treasure. Slowly but surely, that began to change five years ago, when thousands of citizens participated in creating a new master plan for the central Delaware waterfront, which in turn has led to new trails, a new park, and plans for much more.
SPORTS
April 2, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
The Yankees beat Miami, 10-8, on Sunday in the first exhibition between major-league clubs at Marlins Park. But the new park, built on the site of the old Orange Bowl, was secondary to the startling news that closer Mariano Rivera gave up a run in his inning of work, the first time he has allowed a spring training earned run since April 15, 2008. The ballpark, about 16 miles south of the Marlins' old home in the Miami Dolphins' stadium, is still getting finishing touches, among them a pair of 450-gallon aquaria behind home plate.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Details are still skimpy, but it looks as if Chester County will have a new park smack in the middle of one of the fastest-growing regions in the Philadelphia suburbs. Officials are expected to announce tomorrow that Chester County and West Whiteland Township have reached an agreement with Church Farm School to buy hundreds of acres of the school's 1,700-acre tract near Exton for open space and parkland. The exact cost of the new park remains unknown, but officials had said that the earlier $15.1 million asking price was too high.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
You only have to spend a few minutes in Dilworth Park to see what a people magnet it has become since the Center City District completed a dramatic, $55 million makeover two years ago. Besides regular attractions, like the cafe and sparkling fountain, there is something special going on 186 days a year - that's every other day - ranging from concerts and farmers' markets to bocce tournaments and Lupus Awareness booths. Everything, that is, except demonstrations. You read that right.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
With the first day of summer came the dedication of Gloucester County's first state park. The Department of Environmental Protection on Monday formally opened the Tall Pines State Preserve, which used to be a golf course. The new park's 110 acres are in Deptford and Mantua Townships, with the Mantua Creek rolling through it. The preserve is New Jersey's 40th state park, said Bob Martin, commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection. "As a conservationist, it is my job to preserve the treasures of the state of New Jersey," Martin said.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
When it was installed in 1964, Philadelphia's Holocaust Memorial - a statue depicting figures consumed in fire - was the first of its kind in North America. On Tuesday, city officials and a group of Holocaust survivors announced plans for the statue at 16th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to serve as the entrance to a memorial park - one that aims to educate future visitors as the events of the Holocaust recede further into the past. On hand at the memorial Tuesday were members of the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation, which spearheaded the plan, as well as local Holocaust survivors, some of whom worked to erect the original statue, by Polish artist Nathan Rapoport, more than 50 years ago. Max Shieman of North Philadelphia was among them.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
The 9,000 residents of a southern Chester County town will soon have a park of their own. Kennett Township officials said Wednesday that they would create the first municipally owned park within the township's 19 square miles. Two other parks in the township, one of which is partly in Kennett Square, are owned by other entities. "We're so excited," said Lisa Moore, Kennett Township manager. Kennett is one of the last townships in the county without its own municipal park, according to the county's Department of Open Space Preservation.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When computer engineer Jim Nasto started working at the Philadelphia Navy Yard about a decade ago, the 1,200-acre property was a virtual desert of vacant industrial buildings and abandoned parade grounds. Many of those buildings now make up Urban Outfitters' headquarters, while the vast open spaces are being shaped into office parks inhabited by such corporations as GlaxoSmithKline. "I love it," said Nasto, 29, a research contractor for the U.S. Navy, as he tossed a bocce ball in a landscaped park that opened last month.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legislation passed by the New Jersey Assembly last week would provide new protections against any proposed commercial development at Liberty State Park, but environmental advocates say it falls far short of what they had hoped for. Now awaiting Gov. Christie's signature, it requires at least one hearing at the park over any project there, and gives the commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection the right of final approval. An earlier version - which opponents feared would open the door to the park's privatization and commercialization - was signed by the governor in February, then revised to offer protections to the site, a popular gateway to the Statue of Liberty.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Camden, Olivia Glenn vividly recalls being enchanted on a childhood visit to Farnham Park in her Parkside neighborhood. It not only changed her view of the world, but also shaped her destiny. She has made it her mission to protect the environment she loves. "It absolutely stuck with me," she said. "It gave me an appreciation for the beauty of nature. " Glenn, 35, returned to Camden this month as the metro regional manager for the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a nonprofit group that preserves land and other natural resources in the state.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on her 55-foot-tall sculpture at the tip of a spit of land on the Delaware at Washington Avenue, artist Jody Pinto peered down the river and thought of her father and grandparents arriving at the same spot from Italy nearly a century ago. The sculpture, entitled Land Buoy , a silver spire with a spiral staircase wrapped around it, is the focal point of Washington Avenue Pier, a new park, which opened Friday morning where a million European...
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A scenic ribbon of green was created along the Cooper River in 2000 to improve the view for travelers heading to the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia. The lush expanse of meadows and woods supplanted the strip of go-go bars, gas stations, and rooms-by-the-hour motels on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard's south side. Built by the Delaware River Port Authority 13 years ago with breathtaking speed (then-Gov. Christie Whitman saw to that), this lovely place is still fenced in, blocked off, and locked up. But thanks mainly to the good work of grassroots groups, nonprofit organizations, and the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority, the barriers may come down soon.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
THE DEVELOPMENT of the Delaware River Waterfront had been defined, until 2007, by big-box stores and little thought for what is one of the city's great assets. A civic-planning process turned that around, and since then, bike-trail plans, a new park and more has taken bloom. Tonight, the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. will unveil plans for park space and more development along the waterfront. They want to hear from you. A public meeting begins at 7 p.m. at 601 N. Columbus Blvd. Sign up at pennslanding.eventbrite.com.
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