CollectionsNew Park
IN THE NEWS

New Park

SPORTS
April 2, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
The Yankees beat Miami, 10-8, on Sunday in the first exhibition between major-league clubs at Marlins Park. But the new park, built on the site of the old Orange Bowl, was secondary to the startling news that closer Mariano Rivera gave up a run in his inning of work, the first time he has allowed a spring training earned run since April 15, 2008. The ballpark, about 16 miles south of the Marlins' old home in the Miami Dolphins' stadium, is still getting finishing touches, among them a pair of 450-gallon aquaria behind home plate.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
THE SYMBOL of our squandered, inaccessible Delaware waterfront is not so much the presence of the big-box stores like Walmart, but what lies directly behind Walmart: a hurricane fence plastered with large "No Trespassing" signs (and plastered, as well, with trash). That fence and those signs say everything about how we have, until recently, treated one of the city's great treasures, especially people's access to that treasure. Slowly but surely, that began to change five years ago, when thousands of citizens participated in creating a new master plan for the central Delaware waterfront, which in turn has led to new trails, a new park, and plans for much more.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
There's something irresistibly fascinating about the contrast created when a flower blooms atop a pile of rubble. That may be why a proposal to build a park along three miles of abandoned railroad beds, alternately running over and under the ground, is so intriguing. The beautiful-ugly of Philadelphia's industrial past has sent imaginations soaring around the train tracks, which run roughly from Girard Avenue east of Kelly Drive to about Ninth Street and Fairmount Avenue. Paul vanMeter and a group of like-minded urban re-imaginers have organized themselves under the banner Viaductgreene.org, and are building support for the new park, which would showcase the city's former life as a vital manufacturing hub. People will be able to walk or cycle along the old train beds and into the underground tunnels, where they may find vendors or historical exhibits.
SPORTS
November 8, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE FLORIDA MARLINS are interested in pursuing free-agent shortstop Jose Reyes, ESPN.com reported yesterday, citing a team official. The Marlins, who are moving into a new ballpark next season, also are interested in free-agent first basemen Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder, the team official said. The official told ESPN.com's Jerry Crasnick that the Marlins have "reached out" to Reyes. If the Marlins were able to sign Reyes, shortstop Hanley Ramirez would change positions.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Melendez, a member of the varsity softball team at the University of Pennsylvania, surveyed the 24 acres of new athletic fields at Penn Park and expressed giddy enthusiasm. "I feel like I'm in Disney World," the 20-year-old junior said. "Everything came out amazing. " Maybe part of the excitement was practicing against a spectacular evening view of the Center City skyline right across the Schuylkill. And all the grass, real and synthetic, was so green. Penn officials celebrated the official opening Thursday of the $46.5 million collection of fields, a multipurpose stadium, tennis courts, and walkways that serves as the latest people-friendly connection between Center City and University City, and ultimately the rest of West Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest 14 acres of the University of Pennsylvania used to be a parking lot for a fleet of mail trucks. Two years and more than $46 million later, Penn has transformed that wedge of land into a green welcome mat that extends all the way to the Schuylkill. On Thursday, the university will open Penn Park, the centerpiece of a long-term effort to grow the 283-acre campus from its historic core near 34th and Walnut Streets. "It's the first time that, by design, we've set aside open space for the use of the Penn community and beyond," said Amy Gutmann, Penn's president.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The newest 14 acres of the University of Pennsylvania used to be a parking lot for a fleet of mail trucks. Two years and more than $46 million later, Penn has transformed that wedge of land into a green welcome mat that extends all the way to the Schuylkill. On Thursday, the university will open Penn Park, the centerpiece of a long-term effort to grow the 283-acre campus from its historic core near 34th and Walnut Streets. "It's the first time that, by design, we've set aside open space for the use of the Penn community and beyond," said Amy Gutmann, Penn's president.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Kiley Armstrong, Associated Press
ASBURY PARK, N.J. - A new concession offers a modern version of a century old tradition in Asbury Park's century-old tradition: swan boats on Wesley Lake. A short stroll from the boardwalk, locals and tourists alike are happily pedaling around the shallow inland waters while enjoying a view of Asbury Park's old Carousel House and the Victorian splendor of neighboring Ocean Grove. The boats, shaped like the sleek creatures - gleaming and proud-looking, their wings curved with a suggestion of Art Deco - are making quite a splash at this rejuvenated resort.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM/FOOD
Valet parking at restaurants and hotels is considered a sign of exclusivity. But Garth Weldon, owner of the Prime Rib steak house in the Radisson Plaza-Warwick Hotel, says, "This is ridiculous. " Weldon's is one of more than four dozen businesses now receiving their annual bills from the Philadelphia Parking Authority for valet zones. The fee in Center City, University City, and along Delaware Avenue, which in many cases last year was $250 per 20 feet of curb space, is now $2,500 - 10 times as much.
NEWS
May 28, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warning to Philadelphia motorists: If you're planning to park your car on the street in Center City or University City, carry plenty of quarters or invest in a Smart Card, the Parking Authority's version of a pre-paid gift card. The authority's executive director, Vincent Fenerty, said this week that a still-unexplained malady had struck some of the 1,044 kiosks installed to dispense parking receipts in prime curbside parking locations. Around a week ago, Fenerty said, some kiosks began rejecting debit and credit cards.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|