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New Standards

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1997 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In November, Peter Nero and the Philly Pops asked subscribers to turn in ballots listing the kind of music they wanted to hear. In the final four programs of their 18th season, Nero and the Pops are giving the customers what they wanted. What they wanted comes under the heading of standards. Standards are called standards because they're played so often, but the way Nero and the Pops play them is anything but standard. Nero, a jazz pianist par excellence, makes standards sound fresh.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philly-area drivers, already saddled with some of the highest auto inspection fees in the country, have just been hit with a surprise attack. In the past two weeks - without advance warning from PennDOT - thousands of vehicles have been tested under new pollution standards that will ultimately force many drivers to pay for additional repairs. "What's that going to mean? More money, more expense," said Pat Delmar, of Northeast Philadelphia, as she waited for her car at the Pep Boys on Street Road in Bensalem.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
Business groups are hot and bothered about the Clinton administration's new standards for clean air. An official of the National Association of Manufacturers dubbed the proposal "a hasty, throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater response to unproven theories. " A leader of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry called the plan a "waste of money" that had members "stunned and outraged. " But these critics will have a hard time discrediting the benefits of higher clean-air standards - which are based on voluminous, peer-reviewed research.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State regulatory officials gave final approval yesterday to outcome-based education as the teaching model for Pennsylvania's public schools, clearing the way for school districts to decide how they will apply the new academic standards. A third of the state's 501 school districts have until September 1994 to provide the state Education Department with their strategic plans for implementing the program. Another third of the school districts must submit their plans by September 1995, and the final third a year later.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2010 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the heels of penalizing one natural gas operator $240,000 for contaminating water wells, Pennsylvania's top environmental official Thursday urged the industry to immediately adopt proposed new drilling standards rather than waiting for them to be formally enacted. John Hanger, secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, summoned industry representatives to Harrisburg to discuss new construction standards for wells drilled to tap natural gas reserves. The new guidelines are designed to reduce the chance of incidents such as the one that has contaminated 14 water wells in the Susquehanna County town of Dimock.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A state senator yesterday dished out a scathing denunciation of the Whitman administration's proposed new standards for what public school students should be expected to learn, saying that the standards were vague and unintelligible and asking that the proposal be shelved. But Education Commissioner Leo Klagholz defended the standards and the two-year process of crafting them, and expressed frustration that the criticisms came so late, because the state Board of Education is set to approve the standards May 1. The harangue by Sen. Gordon MacInnes (D., Morris)
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Voices from across a broad spectrum addressed the need for stronger 911 legislation yesterday, including several county 911 directors and many telecommunications company representatives. But no voice was more powerful than John Polec's. Three years ago, his 16-year-old son, Eddie, was beaten to death on the steps of a church in Philadelphia's Fox Chase section - despite the 33 calls citizens placed to 911 for help. The case put the nation's eye on flaws in emergency communications systems and led to massive overhauls in Philadelphia's 911 system.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU Inquirer correspondent Maureen Fitzgerald contributed to this article
New Jersey's public school students must learn a foreign language, understand elements of calculus and develop an array of other skills in order to graduate under sweeping new curriculum standards the state Board of Education unanimously approved yesterday. The vote gave Gov. Whitman a significant victory in her bid to reshape the way the state allocates education dollars to school districts, and the standards will prod many districts to wholesale rewriting of their courses. "This is the first comprehensive definition of what each New Jersey student should know, and lays the groundwork for all our other policies," said Education Commissioner Leo F. Klagholz.
NEWS
October 1, 1998
By cracking down on smog, the Clinton administration has put people's health ahead of the pleas of high-polluting states and utility companies. Yes, it will cost an estimated $1.7 billion a year to implement last week's new standards for smog-producing nitrogen oxides, says the Environmental Protection Agency. But that's less than half of what the status quo costs in bronchitis, childhood asthma and other harms. The EPA says the new rules would raise the average electric bill by less than $1 a month - and prices may not rise at all because of deregulation and competition.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1994 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not to spoil your year-end partying, but take notice: If you make, sell or conduct business in any way that affects the environment, a brand-new regulator soon may be at your company's front door. Moreover, you'll invite that newcomer to step right inside and influence everything from the raw materials you choose to the legibility of your internal documents. Because if you don't, by 2000 or so, the only place on the globe where you will be able to sell your goods or services may be the North Pole, experts say. What we are talking about is ISO 14000, the International Organization for Standardization's latest brainchild - a long list of stringent and far- reaching rules to assure corporate environmental responsibility.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
What started out as a shared goal of improving academic standards to prepare students for college and the workforce has collided with ideological differences over states' rights and rigid opposition to President Obama. Caught in the middle is Gov. Christie, a possible presidential contender in 2016 who has made education reform a pillar of his tenure but who must be careful not to alienate potential conservative supporters now denouncing the standards as federal encroachment on the classroom.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
Pennsylvania's judiciary has produced a breathtaking run of scandal, from the highest court to the lowest (Philadelphia's Traffic Court); from kids sentenced for cash, the subject of a new documentary, to tickets fixed for crab cakes (Traffic Court again). It's small consolation, but consolation nevertheless, that it wasn't all for naught. As of July, the state's judges will be governed by a substantially strengthened Judicial Code of Conduct in line with national ethical standards. While the overhaul can't correct all the judiciary's flaws - especially the elections at the root of its problems - the new standards address many of the shortcomings revealed by the scandals of recent years.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jim McLaughlin first learned about federal efficiency standards for lightbulbs - and that incandescents would change or go away - he had but one thought: Stockpile! Two years ago, the Broomall resident bought cases of bulbs. Wednesday, as the final phase of standards kicks in, his inventory has lessened. But at age 71, he figures - and hopes - his bulbs will outlast him. "We have none of the new-generation bulbs in our house, and I plan to keep it that way," he said, adding not quite facetiously, "I'm a grumpy old man. I don't want anyone telling me what to do. " In nearby Wallingford, energy efficiency aficionado David Director is ecstatic about the new bulbs.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | Inquirer Staff
Mayor Nutter and Licenses and Inspection Commissioner Carlton Williams are to announce new proposed demolition standards and controls for the city. The move comes two days after six people were killed and 14 others injured when a Center City thrift store collapsed during the botched demolition of a building next door. The mayor, Williams and other city officials are to outline the proposed standards and controls at a 2 p.m. news conference at City Hall.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans a hearing Wednesday in Philadelphia on an Obama administration proposal to clean up gasoline and automobile emissions, one of only two public sessions nationwide on the so-called Tier 3 standards. The rules, which mandate cleaner fuels and some new vehicle technologies, are aimed at reducing soot, sulfur, and nitrogen oxide emissions. "We're looking at automobiles and fuels as a system," said Christopher Grundler, director of the EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Dina Cappiello, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration will unveil a proposal Friday to clean up gasoline and automobile emissions, a step that officials say will result in cleaner air across the nation and slightly higher prices at the pump. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the rule to reduce sulfur in gasoline and tighten emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017 could increase gas prices by less than a penny per gallon and add $130 to the cost of a vehicle in 2025. But the agency says it will yield billions of dollars in health benefits by slashing smog- and soot-forming pollution come 2030.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Benedict XVI's decision, announced Monday, that he would step down as spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church may prove the signature moment of his eight-year pontificate. His credentials as a theological conservative and church traditionalist have allowed him to take a nearly unprecedented step that a more moderate Pope might not have dared: to hand over the scepter of papal infallibility to someone yet to be chosen, and then do recede into the background as no pope has done for centuries.
NEWS
January 28, 2013
Gov. Christie deserves applause for quickly announcing tough new building standards for the Hurricane Sandy recovery effort. The rules are based on new federal flood-plain maps, which are not expected to be made final for at least 18 months, so the risk assessments may change. But Christie said he deliberately set high standards so property owners can decide now whether to rebuild or move on with their lives. Those who choose to rebuild now will receive guidance on constructing and elevating their homes and businesses.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal government has agreed to drop its new rule that would have required high-efficiency furnaces in Northern states, a victory for critics who warned that the costly standard could backfire and drive urban homeowners to less efficient heating methods. The U.S. Department of Energy and the American Public Gas Association (APGA) on Monday asked the U.S. Appeals Court in the District of Columbia to vacate the rule and to restart the process of devising new furnace efficiency standards.
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