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New Year S Day

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LIVING
December 12, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Leah Ingram spent a grand total of $0 for this year's holiday decorations. OK, she shelled out $5 for a box of clementines, but that counts as part of her grocery bill. "My daughter will eat those after Christmas," Ingram says, referring to a hurricane glass filled with the clementines, to which she added pinecones found during one of said daughter's soccer games. The wreath on the door of their New Hope home was a centerpiece from Ingram's wedding 16 years ago, dressed up with holly leaves and berries.
NEWS
January 8, 2009
OP-ED WRITER Daniel Cirucci's Dec. 30 piece about how "dumb" New Year's Day is exactly that, dumb. For Mr. Cirucci, New Year's Eve/Day may signify nothing but a date change, but the new year is celebrated by hundreds of millions around the world - from a New Year's Day rich with Mummers traditions in Philadelphia, to Japan, where it's the most important holiday of the year and is a symbol of renewal. Synonymous with the new year is "Auld Lang Syne," a song that asks whether old friends and times will be forgotten and promises to remember people of the past with fondness: "For auld lang syne, we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet. " For a world so harshly divided by countries, wars, races and religions, the new year is a holiday celebrated by most everyone - a rare occurrence.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
The Inquirer asked readers to recall their holidays, sharing events that have remained the same over the years, and those that have changed. Here is what four residents had to say: After countless trips to Kiddie City, our living room looked like a toy store on Christmas morning during the years when our children were small. Their pleasure was real, but the glow faded after a while. When our 5-year-old, unwrapping her last present, wailed, "Is that all there is?" it was as if a light bulb flickered on. Is that all there is?
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
It looks like the Y2K computer bug may finally pay off for American workers - and not just for those computer geeks who've been collecting mucho OT to rewrite the software. If you've checked your office calendar, you may have noticed that the official New Year's Day 2000 federal holiday is on Friday, Dec. 31, 1999. There's a growing sentiment to switch the day off to Monday, Jan. 3, 2000. That way, if there's a general computer collapse on Saturday, Jan. 1, the system's techies will have an extra day to debug while the rest of us are at home watching TV. Many experts are predicting, though, that the feds will declare both days holidays, giving us a well-deserved four-day holiday weekend with pay. Of course, some unlucky schlumps will have to work the holiday.
NEWS
May 20, 1997 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 292,267 residents of Delaware County, today is an opportunity to exercise a cherished democratic principle: the right to vote. For the 3,500 employees of Delaware County government, it is also an opportunity to not exercise at all. In addition to being primary election day in Pennsylvania, today is a holiday for Delaware County workers. With 15 paid holidays annually, they rank first among their Southeastern Pennsylvania counterparts. By contrast, Chester, Montgomery and Bucks Counties observe 10, 13 and 14 holidays, respectively.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
America, put up your feet and loosen your tie. It's the week after Christmas, and you're on vacation! Even if you are punching a time card this week, everyone knows you're not really working. Look around the office. It's mostly empty, and the phone rings only rarely. Your colleagues with seniority have the week off, and the boss is out sunning on some Caribbean beach. You're slacking off with two-hour lunches and sliding out the door an hour before quitting time. Gary Blau at Temple University's school of business and management calls it "Shirk Week" - the time between the nation's two biggest holidays.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before you raise your wine glass in a toast to the spirit of Thanksgiving, consider this: One-third of New Jerseyans will hit the roads with holiday drinks under their belts instead of letting a sober friend do the driving. That's according to a poll by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Eagleton Institute, which also shows that while fewer residents drink alcohol, those who do drink more during the holidays - and throw caution to the wind when it comes to driving.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Santa were looking for signs showing him where to stop on Christmas Eve, he couldn't miss Greenhouse Lane. On the street live more than 40 children and, at this time of year, almost as many plastic Santas and snowmen. It's a tradition that began with the neighborhood in 1988, when the first residents moved in. Every house on the street decorates for the holidays. Entire houses are outlined in blinking lights; Santas perch on rooftops and park on front lawns; bows and wreaths fill every window; and the multitude of plastic, metal and wooden reindeer makes one resident's sign proclaiming the area a "reindeer crossing" seem a necessity.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Martin Luther King's Birthday will be observed tomorrow as a federal, state and county holiday: Federal, state and county government officials will have the day off. But most local government officials will have to observe the holiday from the office. Less than a quarter of the 31 municipalities in Lower and Central Bucks County will close their municipal offices tomorrow. "I don't know that there's any connection between what the federal government is given and what local municipalities have," said Yardley Borough Manager Susan Micklewright.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | By Nicole Pensiero, Special to The Inquirer
The greeting cards say "Happy Holidays," but for many people, the seasonal greeting they feel most like uttering is "Bah, humbug!" The holidays are a time of mixed emotions for many people - and a time when people are especially susceptible to depression, mental-health professionals say. While televison shows and greeting cards portray perfectly relaxed families savoring this special time together, reality is often far different. Most people do not realize how common depression is near the holidays, said Leah Rubba-Jones, a clinical social worker who recently spoke to a group of senior citizens at Kennedy Memorial Hospital's Stratford Division in Voorhees.
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NEWS
January 4, 2013
About 255,000 people watched Comcast Corp.'s free holiday video in the lobby of its headquarters building in Center City over the season, the company says. The video was launched in the 2008 holiday season, when 78,000 people viewed it. This year's last show was New Year's Day. Comcast has said it would like to make the show, about 15 minutes long, a holiday attraction for the region.    - Bob Fernandez
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ALTHOUGH their props were destroyed in a four-alarm warehouse fire on Monday, Fralinger String Band will perform in the New Year's Day parade - and their friendly rivals are offering to help. "Our hearts go out to them," said Tom Maminski of the Aqua String Band in Bridesburg. "Whatever they need, our door is open. The competition is New Year's Day, but the rest of the year, we're all one big family. " Aqua Captain Ron Iannacone said that he reached out to Fralinger's president and captain as soon as he heard about the fire to offer support.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | Staff Report
Police have obtained an arrest warrant for a 30-year-old man in the fatal shooting of a 48-year-old man in Frankford on New Year's Day. Wanted is Christopher Johnson of the 1300 block of 66th Avenue in East Oak Lane, police said. Officers responding to a radio call for gunshots at 1:25 a.m. Jan. 1 found Gerard Market shot multiple times in the neck and back on the 4100 block of Orchard Street, where he lived. He died a short time later at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
Ten people were killed and 172 were injured in crashes investigated by Pennsylvania State Police over the four-day New Year's Day holiday driving period. Between Friday and Monday, the agency investigated 552 crashes, Commissioner Frank Noonan said in a statement Tuesday. During the same period a year ago, 11 people were killed and 220 injured in 693 crashes investigated by the state police. This year, 79 of the crashes were alcohol-related and police said troopers made 285 arrests for driving under the influence - along with 3,408 speeding citations, according to state police.
NEWS
January 1, 2012
Sunday    Pennsylvania   New Jersey     Banks    Closed    Optional    Savings & loans    Closed   Optional    Federal agencies    Closed   Closed    Federal courts    Closed   Closed    State agencies    Closed   Closed    Local/state courts *    Closed    Closed    Liquor stores    Closed    Optional    ...
BUSINESS
December 16, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens
Is a new house, or being able to sell your present one, near the top of the list you sent Santa Claus? Because if you're looking for a time to list your house for sale, or to begin searching for that place of your dreams, the holidays might just be it. If you're a seller, one advantage is that would-be buyers out in the market during the holidays tend to have a reason for being there, and so are very serious about the hunt. A recent Move.com survey of Realtors around the country found 79 percent had concluded as much, and area agents and brokers affirmed the observation.
NEWS
December 4, 2009 | By Matt Campbell, McClatchy Newspapers
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The holiday season is often about excess, whether it is food, drink, spending - or waste. It has been calculated that Americans produce an extra 6 million more tons of waste between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. But the holidays are getting greener all the time as people pick up on some easy ideas to ratchet things back a little. And some available options - "green" turkeys, LED lighting displays, Web sites with advice - make that easier. "It has a greater priority today than it did, say, 10 years ago," said Bob Lilienfeld, author and publisher of a Michigan-based newsletter called "Use Less Stuff," and Web site, use-less-stuff.
NEWS
January 8, 2009
OP-ED WRITER Daniel Cirucci's Dec. 30 piece about how "dumb" New Year's Day is exactly that, dumb. For Mr. Cirucci, New Year's Eve/Day may signify nothing but a date change, but the new year is celebrated by hundreds of millions around the world - from a New Year's Day rich with Mummers traditions in Philadelphia, to Japan, where it's the most important holiday of the year and is a symbol of renewal. Synonymous with the new year is "Auld Lang Syne," a song that asks whether old friends and times will be forgotten and promises to remember people of the past with fondness: "For auld lang syne, we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet. " For a world so harshly divided by countries, wars, races and religions, the new year is a holiday celebrated by most everyone - a rare occurrence.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
I KNOW IT'S almost sacrilegious to say this in Philadelphia, but I think New Year's Day is the dumbest "holiday" ever. And New Year's Eve ain't much better. I just don't get it. Never have gotten it, in fact. New Year's Day signifies nothing. It's merely the first day of the year - just a unit of measurement, that's all. It's just a way to keep time, and a totally arbitrary one at that. New Year's Eve is equally as dumb, if not dumber. All the hoopla about midnight on Dec. 31 is just plain bogus, simply an excuse for clubs and restaurants to make a big deal of nothing and charge you big bucks for it. The rudest, loudest, most obnoxious people come crawling out of the woodwork on New Year's Eve. They don't get around very much (and don't go out very much)
LIVING
December 12, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Leah Ingram spent a grand total of $0 for this year's holiday decorations. OK, she shelled out $5 for a box of clementines, but that counts as part of her grocery bill. "My daughter will eat those after Christmas," Ingram says, referring to a hurricane glass filled with the clementines, to which she added pinecones found during one of said daughter's soccer games. The wreath on the door of their New Hope home was a centerpiece from Ingram's wedding 16 years ago, dressed up with holly leaves and berries.
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