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NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there On New Year's Eve 2009, Nathan and his friend Andrea headed toward the Apple Store near Central Park to meet another friend and some of his friends, who were all going to a party on the Lower East Side. Milagros "was wearing a big, goofy hat and eating a hot dog from the hot dog cart," Nathan said. "Something about her caught my eye. " On the ride to the gathering, Milagros could see Nathan watching her in the subway window's reflection. They started talking at that party, and also checked out another one in the apartment next door.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - They are tobogganing on Broadway this week. And diving for touchdowns in a foam pit just off Times Square. Helmeted mannequins in full NFL uniforms share the Coach and Lancôme displays at Macy's. On 42d Street Wednesday night, the Harlem Boys Choir serenaded America's Game. The Super Bowl may be played in New Jersey on Sunday, but it is being played out in full measure in New York City this week. In recognition of an outdoor game at a cold-weather site, the NFL and New York have turned a 13-block stretch of Broadway - the spiritual heart of this great city - to an open-air temple for all things football.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian Hackford is divorcing Philadelphia, citing irreconcilable differences over public education. For most of his adult life, Hackford has loved this city - its energy, its grit, its humor, its culture, its diversity, restaurants, parks, museums, and a host of other ineffable qualities that have made this place home. But try as he might, he no longer believes the Philadelphia School District can be trusted to provide his three children with a good education. "I've lived in the city since 1995.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a beloved cheesecake baked in New York for six decades be just as skillfully prepared in . . . New Jersey? Junior's - New York City's third generation of famed Brooklyn cheesecake bakers - has moved its main baking operations to Burlington City. The company's new location at the foot of the Burlington-Bristol Bridge housed Mother's Kitchen, which produced cheesecakes for Rich's Products Corp. About a year ago, Mother's went south for a new facility in Texas. Junior's owner Alan Rosen needed a larger bakery than the one in Queens, which produced for all the Junior's restaurants and retail.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
LAUREN HITT had picked up and moved from Ohio to Philly to work on the mayoral campaign of Ken Trujillo, the buttoned-down lawyer whom she viewed as a sure thing. About two weeks later, Trujillo's campaign was dead. He had dropped out of the mayor's race to attend to a family matter. It was late January, just four months before the Democratic primary election, and Hitt, Trujillo's newly minted communications director, was suddenly jobless. Now what? she thought. Like a backup prom date, there was Jim Kenney, the veteran unbridled member of City Council, waiting in the wings.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It's hard to make out against the crush of casino closings, but some things in Atlantic City are being reborn. Start with the Claridge Hotel, nearly a century old, now with no gambling but recently reopened, somewhat paradoxically as a 1920s-theme luxury boutique hotel. Off the lobby, art dealer David Holtzman has opened what he calls the largest independent art gallery in the world. On a high floor, familiar Atlantic City LGBT marketer Joel Ballesteros is in charge of a new gay club, Club 11, and the Children's Discovery Museum will move there in the fall.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billy Procida, a real estate lender from Englewood Cliffs, N.J., is coming to the rescue of the stalled Divine Lorraine project on North Broad Street, agreeing to lend $31.5 million to kick-start a conversion of the graffiti-scarred historic building. And just how that came about starts with a story. As Procida tells it, he was checking out another real estate venture near Temple University earlier this year. Driving south on Broad Street, on his way back to the Benjamin Franklin Bridge and home via the New Jersey Turnpike, he spied the Divine Lorraine, the beacon of blight on North Broad Street.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Stylist Brittany Chenault is shopping for spring brights in Century 21 Department Store's cavernous men's section for singer Nick Lachey to wear on VH1's Big Morning Buzz Live . The 26-year-old Brooklyn-based fashionista is a regular at the discount store's downtown flagship. On Monday morning, Chenault's rolling red shopping basket overflows with gingham prints, warm orange hues, and lots of denim. Stylists, she says, shop at Century 21 a lot. "You can get great things at a great price," she says, sifting through racks of fitted menswear from runway faves Viktor & Rolf and Dsquared2.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Bible Society will give up its tony Broadway address for one in Philadelphia's historic district. The society, which has had its headquarters in New York City for 199 years and has operations all over the world, will relocate to 401 Market St., steps from Independence Mall. Mayor Nutter will announce the nonprofit's move, which will bring more than 200 jobs to the city, at a news conference Wednesday. The society's primary mission is to engage more people with the Bible.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MINISTER KING Samir Shabazz, the notorious black supremacist and leader of the New Black Panther Party's Philadelphia chapter, is in jail again. Trenton police arrested him after officers - serving an outstanding warrant out of Atlantic City - found a 9 mm handgun, 30 rifle rounds and one armor-piercing bullet in a room where he was staying in the city's Battle Monument neighborhood, spokesman Lt. Mark Kieffer said. It was the second gun arrest in a year for Shabazz, 42, whose real name is Maruse Heath.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A project in Atlantic City could be awarded close to $33 million in tax credits when the New Jersey Economic Development Authority board meets Thursday. The EDA didn't give details Wednesday about the applicant, Atlantic City Contact Center L.L.C., or the project. A spokeswoman said she could not comment before Thursday's meeting. The meeting agenda says the tax credits - $3.27 million a year over 10 years - would encourage the applicant to "make a capital investment and locate in Atlantic City.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"INFINITELY Polar Bear" is the story of a heavily medicated bipolar man left alone with his two vulnerable kids, a situation often played for laughs. Where would rookie writer-director Maya Forbes get the nerve to suggest this situation is even remotely funny? No doubt from her own formative experience being raised in Boston by a bipolar father who, fresh out of the mental hospital, took over parenting when his wife went to New York City to earn a degree. "Infinitely Polar Bear" (polar bear is the best the youngest child can manage trying to say her father is "definitely bipolar")
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
LAUREN HITT had picked up and moved from Ohio to Philly to work on the mayoral campaign of Ken Trujillo, the buttoned-down lawyer whom she viewed as a sure thing. About two weeks later, Trujillo's campaign was dead. He had dropped out of the mayor's race to attend to a family matter. It was late January, just four months before the Democratic primary election, and Hitt, Trujillo's newly minted communications director, was suddenly jobless. Now what? she thought. Like a backup prom date, there was Jim Kenney, the veteran unbridled member of City Council, waiting in the wings.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a beloved cheesecake baked in New York for six decades be just as skillfully prepared in . . . New Jersey? Junior's - New York City's third generation of famed Brooklyn cheesecake bakers - has moved its main baking operations to Burlington City. The company's new location at the foot of the Burlington-Bristol Bridge housed Mother's Kitchen, which produced cheesecakes for Rich's Products Corp. About a year ago, Mother's went south for a new facility in Texas. Junior's owner Alan Rosen needed a larger bakery than the one in Queens, which produced for all the Junior's restaurants and retail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Radio 104.5 FM threw a summer block party three weeks before the official start of the season on Sunday at Festival Pier. It had all the makings of a good street fair. It was free (station fans had to register for tickets). There were cold brews, grilled food, party games like beer pong, and teens lying around in shorts. And there were cool kid-indie bands as the long afternoon's sound track. The Oxford, England, alt-rock unit A Silent Film was the headliner - a good, not entirely contagious act. Entering to the sound of swarming bees, military drum riffs, and the splintered synths of "Tomorrow," A Silent Film was reminiscent of Psychedelic Furs toward the end of the '80s - a spooky but overly slick brand of sinister new wave.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2015 | Ellen Gray, Daily News
* ODD MOM OUT. 10 tonight, Bravo. * BECOMING US. 9 tonight, ABC Family. PHILLY'S Julie Rottenberg and Elisa Zuritsky aren't done with New York. TV writers who explored singles and friendship in "Sex and the City" and took viewers backstage on Broadway in "Smash," the longtime writing partners take a bite out of another Big Apple subculture in Bravo's new comedy "Odd Mom Out. " The show, premiering tonight in back-to-back episodes, stars Jill Kargman, an Upper East Sider who plays an only slightly more outrageous version of herself as a well-off but not super-rich mother of three trying to stay afloat in a sea of affluence.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It's hard to make out against the crush of casino closings, but some things in Atlantic City are being reborn. Start with the Claridge Hotel, nearly a century old, now with no gambling but recently reopened, somewhat paradoxically as a 1920s-theme luxury boutique hotel. Off the lobby, art dealer David Holtzman has opened what he calls the largest independent art gallery in the world. On a high floor, familiar Atlantic City LGBT marketer Joel Ballesteros is in charge of a new gay club, Club 11, and the Children's Discovery Museum will move there in the fall.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Palmer and Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writers
With new safety measures in place, passenger trains resumed shuttling between Philadelphia and New York City on Monday, restoring full service to the bustling Northeast Corridor for the first time since last week's deadly Amtrak derailment at Frankford Junction. Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz said the railroad installed an automatic train-control system over the weekend on the northbound tracks to limit speed approaching the curve to 45 m.p.h. Train 188 was traveling at 106 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamer Hunt typically commutes from Center City to a teaching job at the Parsons School for Design in New York City four days a week on a 7:28 or 8:30 a.m. Amtrak train. After Hunt, 50, learned Tuesday night about the derailment of Amtrak Train 188 at Frankford Junction, he tried to take a bus Wednesday morning, but tickets were sold out. On Wednesday, he worked from home via Skype on his computer to videoconference with a fellow teacher and class of 20 students. "I was up on the big screen, and talking with the students," said the director of the graduate design program at Parsons as he waited in line for an 8:15 a.m. Megabus on Thursday in University City.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
If Amtrak Train 188 had been heading to Philadelphia from New York City, it would not have derailed at the sharp Frankford Junction curve, because an automatic braking mechanism has been in place for years on the southbound side of the tracks to stop a speeding train. But Amtrak never installed the same electronics on the northbound side, so Train 188 was able to enter the curve where the speed limit is 50 m.p.h. at more than 100 m.p.h. Amtrak CEO Joseph Boardman said in an interview that the lack of the automatic-braking control on one side of the curve was "a loophole" that he was unaware of until Train 188 derailed Tuesday, killing eight people and injuring about 200. The death toll rose by one Thursday, when the eighth victim was found in the wreckage of the mangled first passenger car. Mayor Nutter said officials now believe all 243 people who were on the train have been accounted for. The eight victims have been identified through various sources as Jim Gaines, 48, an Associated Press employee, of Plainsboro, N.J.; Abid Gilani, 55, a bank executive, of Rockville, Md.; Bob Gildersleeve, 45, an Ecolab executive, of Elkridge, Md.; Giuseppe Piras, 41, an olive-oil and wine merchant, of Italy; Justin Zemser, 20, a U.S. Naval Academy midshipman; and three passengers from New York City - Laura Finamore, 47, a corporate real estate officer; Derrick Griffith, 42, a dean at Medgar Evers College; and Rachel Jacobs, 39, an online start-up executive.
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