CollectionsNew York City
IN THE NEWS

New York City

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there On New Year's Eve 2009, Nathan and his friend Andrea headed toward the Apple Store near Central Park to meet another friend and some of his friends, who were all going to a party on the Lower East Side. Milagros "was wearing a big, goofy hat and eating a hot dog from the hot dog cart," Nathan said. "Something about her caught my eye. " On the ride to the gathering, Milagros could see Nathan watching her in the subway window's reflection. They started talking at that party, and also checked out another one in the apartment next door.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - They are tobogganing on Broadway this week. And diving for touchdowns in a foam pit just off Times Square. Helmeted mannequins in full NFL uniforms share the Coach and Lancôme displays at Macy's. On 42d Street Wednesday night, the Harlem Boys Choir serenaded America's Game. The Super Bowl may be played in New Jersey on Sunday, but it is being played out in full measure in New York City this week. In recognition of an outdoor game at a cold-weather site, the NFL and New York have turned a 13-block stretch of Broadway - the spiritual heart of this great city - to an open-air temple for all things football.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney might have persuaded City Council to support a tax on sweetened beverages. But in the end what could matter most is if his lawyers can persuade the courts. Minutes after Council passed the unprecedented per-ounce levy Thursday, the beverage industry vowed to continue a fight it has already poured more than $5 million into by filing suit. Kenney wasn't rattled. "We're ready," he said. But a particularly qualified voice says Kenney shouldn't be so confident. Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald Castille has called the tax unconstitutional.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beverly Sendrow Tarnopol, 77, of Mount Laurel, owner with her husband, Sheldon, of the former Philadelphia and Lower Merion retailer Tarnopol Furs, died Thursday, June 19, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, after a fall. Mrs. Tarnopol, known as Buni, was born in Philadelphia and graduated from Overbrook High School in 1954. A son, Neil, said that Sheldon Tarnopol's grandfather Max began the business, first in Russia, then in New York City. Between the early 1900s and the 1950s, Tarnopol Furs was at 16th and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia, before moving in 1956 to the City Line Shopping Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jon Snyder, Staff Writer
CYCLISTS HAVE been able to ride on old rail lines since the rails-to-trails movement took hold in the '70s and '80s. Now there's an opportunity to bike the rails themselves with Rail Explorers, an upstate New York outfit running an eight-week pilot program on the Wilmington & Western Railroad line along Red Clay Creek in Delaware. Rail Explorers uses rail-bikes, which resemble pedal cars. Loaded with pedalers, the quad-seat bikes can weigh as much as a small car, so they feature a robust hydraulic disc-brake system.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ian Mark Jones, 32, who left Yardley in 2008 for a modeling career in New York City, drowned in the Hudson River earlier this week during a kayaking accident in Upstate New York. Mr. Jones had been missing since the morning of Aug. 8, when the kayak which he and his girlfriend were paddling capsized, throwing them into the river in Dutchess County, 100 miles north of New York City. Mr. Jones' girlfriend, Tali Lennox Fruchtmann, daughter of the singer Annie Lennox, was picked up by a passing boat.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By Edward G. Rendell, Thomas J. Ridge, and Rebecca W. Rimel What do Pope Francis, singer and human-rights advocate Bono, and both the Republican and Democratic national committees have in common? In the last two decades, they chose Philadelphia as the best place to advance their values and mission. And the audience was worldwide. Twenty years ago, Google was still a research project at Stanford. The iPhone was more than a decade away. And Netflix hadn't started mailing DVDs.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The pediatrician who led New York City's health department through major campaigns against tobacco and sugary soda was named by Mayor Kenney on Monday to head Philadelphia's Department of Public Health. Thomas A. Farley, 59, replaces acting Health Commissioner Jane Baker. He will start Feb. 16. Farley, who served under Mayor Michael Bloomberg from 2009 to 2014, is often credited with helping to make the city one of the healthiest in America. Life expectancy for New Yorkers during the Bloomberg administration grew by three years, while across the nation it rose by 1.7 years.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MINISTER KING Samir Shabazz, the notorious black supremacist and leader of the New Black Panther Party's Philadelphia chapter, is in jail again. Trenton police arrested him after officers - serving an outstanding warrant out of Atlantic City - found a 9 mm handgun, 30 rifle rounds and one armor-piercing bullet in a room where he was staying in the city's Battle Monument neighborhood, spokesman Lt. Mark Kieffer said. It was the second gun arrest in a year for Shabazz, 42, whose real name is Maruse Heath.
SPORTS
August 31, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
The Rhule family took off from Kansas City, setting out for New York City with two young children, family mutt squeezed in, U-Haul behind. Dennis and Gloria Rhule don't want to sound too lofty, but they saw their next move as a calling. Dennis, graduated from the Nazarene Theological Seminary, was ready to begin work as an urban missionary, as an assistant pastor at a church just off Times Square. Gloria would work with at-risk women and children. Their son remembers most of it, but Matt Rhule, now Temple's football coach, might not recall how before the Rhules reached the East Coast, a rainstorm proved the U-Haul's roof had a leak.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By Edward G. Rendell, Thomas J. Ridge, and Rebecca W. Rimel What do Pope Francis, singer and human-rights advocate Bono, and both the Republican and Democratic national committees have in common? In the last two decades, they chose Philadelphia as the best place to advance their values and mission. And the audience was worldwide. Twenty years ago, Google was still a research project at Stanford. The iPhone was more than a decade away. And Netflix hadn't started mailing DVDs.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Sully Tom Hanks stars as veteran airline pilot Chesley Sullenberger in this deftly executed account of the amazing emergency landing of a US Airways passenger jet in the middle of a New York City waterway - the so-called Miracle on the Hudson. A true-life drama about heroism and people working in harmony under exceptional conditions, and a sobering deconstruction of the flight's aftermath: Second-guessing, self-doubt, an administrative body - the National Transportation Safety Board - that appears to be looking for a scapegoat.
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | JEWELERS ROW Philly must protect its historic features David B. Brownlee and George Claflen of the Design Advocacy Group of Philadelphia are right to decry the incipient destruction of the Jewelers Row community that will surely follow the razing of five buildings on Sansom Street ("A plea to preserve key facets of gem that is Jewelers Row," Sunday). Toll Bros., the city administration, and the Mayor's Office may try to argue that preserving a façade will reflect the rhythm and scale of Jewelers Row, but there is no denying that the proposed 16-story apartment or condo building behind the façade will dwarf and ruin the rhythm and scale of the neighborhood.
SPORTS
August 31, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
The Rhule family took off from Kansas City, setting out for New York City with two young children, family mutt squeezed in, U-Haul behind. Dennis and Gloria Rhule don't want to sound too lofty, but they saw their next move as a calling. Dennis, graduated from the Nazarene Theological Seminary, was ready to begin work as an urban missionary, as an assistant pastor at a church just off Times Square. Gloria would work with at-risk women and children. Their son remembers most of it, but Matt Rhule, now Temple's football coach, might not recall how before the Rhules reached the East Coast, a rainstorm proved the U-Haul's roof had a leak.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By John Taylor
  While we mourn his passing with sadness, John Timoney, who was once described as having "the soul of a street cop, the analytical skills of a professor, and the gruff tenacity of - in his words - an 'egomaniacal loudmouth,'" will be remembered by many for having revolutionized the way the Philadelphia Police Department looked at and developed strategies to fight crime. It could be said that Timoney was an innovator at a time when innovation in law enforcement was in short supply.
NEWS
August 9, 2016
Most likely Mayor Kenney had a number of ideas when he was merely a councilman that he can finally put into action now that he's the top dog at City Hall. But the fact that he can doesn't necessarily mean that he should. Three years ago, for example, when then-Councilman Kenney proposed selling the luxury box seats that the city acquired in exchange for helping to fund construction of Lincoln Financial Field and other sports venues, the idea fell upon Mayor Nutter's deaf ears and went nowhere.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Are you 55 or older? Want to give back to the community, plus earn a $10-an-hour stipend? Then you might want to join the ranks of ReServeInc.org, an organization that pairs nonprofits and public agencies with older professionals, which it calls ReServists. Soon-to-be seniors use their skills, experience, and talents for the greater good. Robert Kennedy, 80, a retired geriatrician, now serves as a team adviser for ReServeInc.org's dementia-care coaching program, commuting from his weekend home in Milford, Pa., to his work for the organization in New York City.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
In his fiction, Jay McInerney chronicles New York City life. From the coked-up wannabes he portrayed in his now-classic first novel, Bright Lights, Big City , to the titans of various industries who are now a good three decades older in his new and eighth novel, Bright, Precious Days (which is out on Tuesday), McInerney gives us characters and dialogue that could happen only in Manhattan, and we love him all the better for the critical lens he shines on these very particular island inhabitants.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
In a contest between the Philly cheesesteak and New York cheesecake, which comes out on top as the big cheese? In the NY/PA Food Fight, a competition that matched five classic Philadelphia foods with five New York City counterparts Tuesday, Philadelphia just barely came out on top. For many, it was a welcome and lighthearted respite from the drama and party turmoil of the first days of the Democratic National Convention. The event starred U.S. Reps. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.) and Carolyn Maloney (D., N.Y.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Mila Kunis: It ain't easy! Beauty, grace, fame, and talent don't make motherhood any easier. Just ask Mila Kunis , who costars with Kristen Bell , Kathryn Hahn , and Christina Applegate in Bad Moms , in theaters July 29. Kunis, who already has daughter Wyatt with Ashton Kutcher , is expecting her second baby. She laughs at the idea that one could balance two kids, a job, and a husband. "There's no such thing as balance," Kunis tells E!News at the movie's New York premiere.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|