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March 6, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Ricardo Morales, announced in April as the New York Philharmonic's new principal clarinetist, has resigned the post before even beginning, the Philharmonic acknowledged Monday after a reporter's inquiry. "For family reasons, Mr. Morales has chosen to remain in Philadelphia, where he currently holds the position of principal clarinet with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The New York Philharmonic wishes Mr. Morales well in his future endeavors," a Philharmonic statement said. A Philadelphia Orchestra Association spokeswoman said president Allison B. Vulgamore was unavailable, and the orchestra would offer only a short statement on the matter.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The New York Philharmonic is not where audiences typically go for end-of-the-world adventures with potentially scandalous music. But in an event that's sure to draw at least as many listeners from outside the city as from its core audience, the orchestra this week not only will perform its first-ever fully staged opera, but will do so with a prickly, sprawling work that the usual operatic institutions lack either the moxie or the money to mount....
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Kurt Masur has been named music director of the New York Philharmonic, ending a 1 1/2-year search to find Zubin Mehta's successor. At a news conference yesterday in New York, Stephen Stamas, chairman of the Philharmonic's board of directors, announced that Masur had accepted a five- year appointment to begin during the 1992-93 season. Mehta will leave the orchestra after 13 years, at the end of the 1990-91 season. During 1991-92, Masur will serve as music director-designate, conducting two weeks of subscription concerts in addition to planning future seasons and auditioning players.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Classical music lovers know that Christmas is coming when symphony orchestras begin issuing imperiously packaged box sets as the ideal gift. Even before the recording industry took a downturn, orchestras began to raid their radio archives for great live performances of the recent and distant past not previously issued commercially. The lone holdout among the Big Five orchestras has been the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a situation finally rectified by its new 12-disc Symphony Hall Centennial Celebration.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - If ever an opera could cause brain damage, it's Gyorgy Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre. If ever the destruction of gray matter could be utterly pleasurable, it was Thursday at Avery Fisher Hall, when the New York Philharmonic staged this bizarre end-of-the-world comedy - an event that may signify several important cultural turning points. The clangorous, atonal music, which used lots of nonmusical instruments, such as car horns and ringing phones, played to a sold-out house, two thirds of which wasn't regular subscribers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If ever an opera could cause brain damage, it's Gyorgy Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre. If ever the destruction of gray matter could be utterly pleasurable, it was Thursday at Avery Fisher Hall, when the New York Philharmonic staged this bizarre end-of-the-world comedy - an event that may signify several important cultural turning points. The clangorous, atonal music, which used lots of nonmusical instruments, such as car horns and ringing phones, played to a sold-out house, two thirds of which wasn't regular subscribers.
NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The conductor now most often venerated among the great figures of the past is Kurt Masur. Long lauded for building the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra into one of the most refined ensembles in the world, and for disciplining the New York Philharmonic into the great orchestra that everybody knew it could be, Masur had a regrettably short guest stint with the Philadelphia Orchestra and violinist Sergey Khachatryan (only Friday and Saturday at the Kimmel...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Splash and splendor merge for few composers the way they did for Leonard Bernstein. And what's a New York Philharmonic gala without those qualities, especially the splash? So it was altogether right and fitting that the Symphonic Dances made from Lenny's sassy masterwork - West Side Story - were the essence of the orchestra's season opener on Wednesday evening. The event marked the 150th anniversary of the orchestra, which took on a dash and splendor under the late Bernstein's tenure as music director that likely will never be equaled.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Pierre Boulez would have had to play a central role in anything called the First New York International Festival of the Arts. The French composer, conductor and musical agitator jarred New York sufficiently during his tenure as music director of the New York Philharmonic in the 1970s to help pave the way for this festival. His departure in 1977 from the Philharmonic was, in his mind, a retreat. He had not significantly changed the orchestra or its audience, and he returned to Paris to lead IRCAM, a government-financed research project for new music.
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NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Claude Frank, 89, a pianist much admired for interpretations elegantly perched between penetrating expressivity and rigorous intellectual inquest, died Saturday, Dec. 27, at his home in Manhattan, said his daughter, violinist Pamela Frank. He had suffered from dementia in recent years. Mr. Frank was an influential performer and pedagogue, teaching at Yale University for nearly four decades, and a member of the Curtis Institute of Music faculty since 1988. He made his New York Town Hall debut in 1950 - he had played Times Hall earlier - and, after performing with Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic in 1959, appeared with nearly every important orchestra in the United States and Europe.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra was on much newish ground Thursday with familiar composer names but not familiar pieces, chief among them that woolly bear of a choral work, the Glagolitic Mass of Leos Janacek. I looked forward to seeing the facial reactions of the listeners around me to a piece so singular in the choral literature that you might not know what hit you. The piece is primitivistic yet modern, devotional yet secular, and so impulsive that even seasoned Janacek lovers are hard-pressed to know what comes next.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra is not what it used to be. And that's excellent news. The faces haven't changed much but the touring demeanor has, from that of the ensemble that walked on water during European summer festivals past to the 2014 version that does whatever it must to manage the wide-reaching, 2 1/2-week tour of Asia that ended Thursday in Taipei, Taiwan. The orchestra's leadership has been rewriting the rules, negotiating China dates themselves in ways that cultivate new sponsors and could net an estimated $1 million-plus.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Monkey: Journey to the West , now settling in for nearly a month of hyperphysical, family-friendly performances at Lincoln Center, may signify the arrival of something more momentous than the show's buoyant, picaresque journey suggests: Chinese ticket buyers in the United States. "China is happening on a lot of levels, and it's happening in the arts world," says Nigel Redden, director of the Lincoln Center Festival. But not necessarily with the seriousness that usually characterizes a festival known to host ambitious endeavors by the Royal Shakespeare Company and modernist German operas that others don't touch.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Ricardo Morales, announced in April as the New York Philharmonic's new principal clarinetist, has resigned the post before even beginning, the Philharmonic acknowledged Monday after a reporter's inquiry. "For family reasons, Mr. Morales has chosen to remain in Philadelphia, where he currently holds the position of principal clarinet with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The New York Philharmonic wishes Mr. Morales well in his future endeavors," a Philharmonic statement said. A Philadelphia Orchestra Association spokeswoman said president Allison B. Vulgamore was unavailable, and the orchestra would offer only a short statement on the matter.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - The New York Philharmonic is spending the week playing amid giant sunflowers at Lincoln Center - in one of several firsts. How often, for example, do Philharmonic patrons witness a singer devouring a rabbit onstage? The occasion is the Janácek opera The Cunning Little Vixen , in music director Alan Gilbert's last local concert of the season. The performance will be repeated Friday and Saturday. Symphony orchestras have long performed operatic works as special occasions.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
"They could play this piece in their sleep," said a Verizon Hall usher to the critic entering the hall Saturday night for the Philadelphia Orchestra and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6 . True enough. But while every financial and organizational aspect of the orchestra's operation undergoes intense scrutiny, there's nothing as educational as this piece, long central to the orchestra's repertoire, for gauging the state of the ensemble. The audience declared the concert a success even before it started, giving guest conductor Kurt Masur a hero's welcome as the venerable former music director of the New York Philharmonic made his slow walk to the podium.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If ever an opera could cause brain damage, it's Gyorgy Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre. If ever the destruction of gray matter could be utterly pleasurable, it was Thursday at Avery Fisher Hall, when the New York Philharmonic staged this bizarre end-of-the-world comedy - an event that may signify several important cultural turning points. The clangorous, atonal music, which used lots of nonmusical instruments, such as car horns and ringing phones, played to a sold-out house, two thirds of which wasn't regular subscribers.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - If ever an opera could cause brain damage, it's Gyorgy Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre. If ever the destruction of gray matter could be utterly pleasurable, it was Thursday at Avery Fisher Hall, when the New York Philharmonic staged this bizarre end-of-the-world comedy - an event that may signify several important cultural turning points. The clangorous, atonal music, which used lots of nonmusical instruments, such as car horns and ringing phones, played to a sold-out house, two thirds of which wasn't regular subscribers.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The New York Philharmonic is not where audiences typically go for end-of-the-world adventures with potentially scandalous music. But in an event that's sure to draw at least as many listeners from outside the city as from its core audience, the orchestra this week not only will perform its first-ever fully staged opera, but will do so with a prickly, sprawling work that the usual operatic institutions lack either the moxie or the money to mount....
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